Ebay 'certificate of posting for online postage' against claim

18
Posted 14th Jan
I've recently sold some stuff on ebay and the buyer(s) have asked for first class - not signed - postage.

If there are any disputes as to the item not being received, can I use the 'certificate of posting for online postage' (found in ebay 'postage labels' tab on website) as proof it's been posted in my defense, as long as it's stamped and signed by the post office?

Thanks
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If someone asked me to not send it signed, I’d send it signed.
18 Comments
I'd just send it signed, if they're not in they can go collect it from the depot.
Unless recently changed, ebay/PayPal requirements are proof of delivery, not necessarily signed, otherwise seller not protected. Investigate if you can use Royal Mail's "RM24" service which is scanned by postie on delivery as that provides online PoD.
As above send it signed they can just say prove they got it and it wasnt lost in the post or say you sent them something else not what they bought you will have the weight on signed for.
No point sending signed unless worth more than £20.
If someone asked me to not send it signed, I’d send it signed.
You can prove postage but buyer can still claim not received it’s your job to be sure it’s received not just posted. Like others have said send signed for or even tracked as it doesn’t need a signature.
jon81uk14/01/2020 14:10

No point sending signed unless worth more than £20.


It’s more about the buyer lying and you been responsible and not about the insurance.
Royal Mail small parcel service will give a proof of delivery without a signature from the barcode on the label/post office Horizon receipt.
Ebay require proof.
You can choose to save £1 by not paying for the signature but weigh that up against what you are sending.
If you sell £3 items then it isn't cost effective.
If you sell £20 items then you would have to sell another 20 to get your money back if one goes missing (or is claimed to). Potentially you can claim back from RM - unsure.
If you send a relatively expensive item then pay the £1.. every single time.
No. Get it signed for, you need proof of delivery.
toonsquirel14/01/2020 14:22

It’s more about the buyer lying and you been responsible and not about the …It’s more about the buyer lying and you been responsible and not about the insurance.



Touch wood I've not had many issues, only maybe 3 items gone "missing" over all my eBay sales, but I managed to make a claim against Royal Mail just fine with just proof of posting, the ebay message and the auction to show the value.
jon81uk14/01/2020 14:53

Touch wood I've not had many issues, only maybe 3 items gone "missing" …Touch wood I've not had many issues, only maybe 3 items gone "missing" over all my eBay sales, but I managed to make a claim against Royal Mail just fine with just proof of posting, the ebay message and the auction to show the value.


But still, why not just send it signed for by paying an extra quid and save any likely hassle should anything at all happen
ThaCheezBurglar14/01/2020 15:35

But still, why not just send it signed for by paying an extra quid and …But still, why not just send it signed for by paying an extra quid and save any likely hassle should anything at all happen



Because that would cost the buyer an extra pound, potentially making my low value stuff even worse value. If the auction is £1.99 plus £3.35 postage, then making it £4.40 postage might be the deal-breaker that stops someone bidding. On low value stuff like this it is barely worth selling it at all so why worry about scammers trying to scam me for a couple of quid. If the item is worth over £20 and therefore needs to go signed for to get the higher compensation value with Royal Mail then I do send signed for. The amount of hassle to claim back from Royal Mail is the same no matter whether signed for or not.
Edited by: "jon81uk" 14th Jan
If it’s under £20 you can claim from Royal Mail using your proof of postage. You will not win an eBay case with this and will have to refund the buyer first and then file your claim with Royal Mail.

Anything over £20 in value needs to be signed for so you have adequate insurance from Royal Mail should it go missing and this will also prove to eBay it was delivered
Edited by: "myusernamehasgone234" 14th Jan
If someone asked me to send it "not signed" that would instantly raise an alarm bell with me and I would send it signed.
southsidesilver14/01/2020 16:42

If someone asked me to send it "not signed" that would instantly raise an …If someone asked me to send it "not signed" that would instantly raise an alarm bell with me and I would send it signed.


The seller may have given ebay postage options e.g.
1st class £3
1st class signed for £4

The buyer should choose £3 as they are covered. The seller then has to take the hit or take the risk.
RM hase changed recently. Even 1st and 2nd class (non signed for or tracked) now provides a barcode number and actually confirms delivery and is good enough proof for ebay to win a claim once delivered, i wouldnt worry (i sell on eBay full time)
Edited by: "Sandy1012" 15th Jan
hurley3114/01/2020 14:39

No. Get it signed for, you need proof of delivery.


For clarity: proof of delivery does not exclusively require "signed for." There are a number of services that provide proof of delivery without recipient signature.
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