Expired

eBay make seller pay for return postage on faulty items.

29
Found 13th Aug 2014
Many of our sellers have already started using eBay Managed Returns and are paying for return postage on faulty or not as described items. Starting from September 15, we will introduce requirements that all sellers take responsibility for return postage on items which are faulty or not as described. If sellers choose not to facilitate a return or provide/fund return postage for these items, we may refund their buyers without requiring them to return the item and in turn we will seek reimbursement from sellers.

What do you guys think, will this be abused by buyers or actually be fair so buyers don't have to foot the bill for faulty items.

This is something which needed to change because it was unfair for buyers however I just hope it doesn't get abused.

Thanks
Community Updates
Ask
29 Comments
I'm going to stop selling items on eBay now, there are too many dodgy buyers on eBay, and this just makes things easier for them.
Those are the rules for all distance selling outlets.

Obviously it can be open for abuse, but as you already state, a buyer should never be out of pocket if an item is faulty or not as described, it is not their fault.

It is up to the seller of any company, be it through Ebay, their own website or via the phone, to make sure the items are returned. The buyer does not have to send them back, they can instruct to the seller to arrange courier at the sellers cost and still claim a refund even if it does not get collected. (No idea where you stand if there have been numerous failed collection attempts as I have not looked that far into it).

You just have to factor in any sort of misuse of the regulations into your costings.
NEtech

Those are the rules for all distance selling outlets.Obviously it can be … Those are the rules for all distance selling outlets.Obviously it can be open for abuse, but as you already state, a buyer should never be out of pocket if an item is faulty or not as described, it is not their fault.It is up to the seller of any company, be it through Ebay, their own website or via the phone, to make sure the items are returned. The buyer does not have to send them back, they can instruct to the seller to arrange courier at the sellers cost and still claim a refund even if it does not get collected. (No idea where you stand if there have been numerous failed collection attempts as I have not looked that far into it).You just have to factor in any sort of misuse of the regulations into your costings.



I personally only sell privately on eBay, however it will be interesting to see what happens. This will take effect on the 15th September. I certainly will help buyers, I just hope eBay keep ontop and ensure this is not abused to much.
It's about time sellers had to pay for these returns. I buy and sell on eBay and have had experience of receiving a faulty item and having to return it at my cost.

Yes it could be open to abuse but the good far outweighs the bad as far as I am concerned. There are plenty of sellers who abuse the rules it's about time that buyers are not out of pocket from purchases that are not as described.
Dear eBay user, thank you for being a valued member of our community but we have decided to bully you even further and to open you up to more fraudulent purchases and now turn your little business in to a short term hire shop all at your cost.

For legitimate faulty returns i am all for it but you know this will be highly abused
Distance Selling regulations specify that the seller has to refund, it's never been an option, however some of the cowboys on ebay don't play by the books
bonjourhellfire

Distance Selling regulations specify that the seller has to refund, it's … Distance Selling regulations specify that the seller has to refund, it's never been an option, however some of the cowboys on ebay don't play by the books



Not really the same thing as eBay don't enforce that currently, now it looks like they will do from the 15th September. Also that only applied to business sellers, I'm not sure however I believe this applies to all sellers; private and business.
Edited by: "joshp" 13th Aug 2014
Fleecebay I call it now....
I have an Ebay case open at the moment.

I won the bidding on a CD and paid immediately but the seller failed to put enough postage on the item so I had to pay an additional £1.53 to receive the item.
The seller has refused to reimburse me the £1.53 but has offered a full refund including postage if I return the item.
I have argued as it is his mistake why should I lose out on having the item and instead have asked again to be reimbursed for the £1.53.

I am waiting for Ebay to decide.
donaldduck2

I have an Ebay case open at the moment.I won the bidding on a CD and paid … I have an Ebay case open at the moment.I won the bidding on a CD and paid immediately but the seller failed to put enough postage on the item so I had to pay an additional £1.53 to receive the item.The seller has refused to reimburse me the £1.53 but has offered a full refund including postage if I return the item.I have argued as it is his mistake why should I lose out on having the item and instead have asked again to be reimbursed for the £1.53.I am waiting for Ebay to decide.



Well that's annoying, especially since the PO should have double checked when they sent the item. Unless they put it in the Post Box?

I sense a negative feedback would be appropriate as its not your fault. I personally would have just refunded you the £1.53.


Edited by: "joshp" 13th Aug 2014
Did I see something about ebay putting prices up again ,soon.
Don't see the point selling now, no profit left.
leelee6781

Fleecebay I call it now....


Indeed with the amount of counterfeit goods/services. eBay Managed Returns should have been applied to all private & business sellers in the 1st place.
billyboy1

Did I see something about ebay putting prices up again ,soon. Don't see … Did I see something about ebay putting prices up again ,soon. Don't see the point selling now, no profit left.


moneysavingexpert.com/new…ise
bonjourhellfire

Distance Selling regulations specify that the seller has to refund, it's … Distance Selling regulations specify that the seller has to refund, it's never been an option, however some of the cowboys on ebay don't play by the books



DSR only applies to Business Sellers, there are pretty much no rules or protection for Private sellers under SOGA and not just on Fleabay.

Edited by: "Likely2" 13th Aug 2014
Its getting worse and im guessing ebay will pass the debt on to a debt collection agency if you dont pay.
To be honest, I agree slightly with this being a good thing.

You sell a broken item, you cover the costs of receiving the broken item back.
Don't describe your item well enough, that's your fault in having someone buying the wrong item.

I've been screwed over by sellers a few times on eBay, and I'm glad eBay helps out for my cases.

1) Seller sold me a broken TV streaming box listed as NEW, ignored my e-mails. eBay sent me a free return post, and tracked the delivery, and refunded me.

2) Seller wasn't happy with my bid on a baby death lens, took my money, closed his account, waited 2 weeks re-listed the item on a new account (account name was almost identical, and the listing was identical word for word), eBay got my money back.

3) Bidded on the wrong item, an 450D DSLR, won the auction and was informed by a friend that they told me to get the 550D, explained the situation to the seller, and he wasn't impressed.
I told him I'd cover the listing costs, and a little extra for wasting his time (about £15 in all).

He gave me some story that his son had already spent the money by the time he read my message.

I won the item around 11pm Saturday, and sent the e-mail 1am Sunday and got a response around 10.30am the same day....

So after telling him it was going to be my first DSLR, and I made the mistake in numbers, he got £30 out of me for wasting his time. I didn't know what I could've done, because he would've sent the camera to me, and I couldn't say it wasn't as described, and wasn't accepted for returns. So as it was my fault, I took it as a nasty learn the hard way.

So I agree that the people who cause the issue should get the problems. But there are a lot of people out there who are genuine and haven't done anything wrong, and get screwed over by these rules. So It's hard to protect everyone.
kos1c

To be honest, I agree slightly with this being a good thing. You sell a … To be honest, I agree slightly with this being a good thing. You sell a broken item, you cover the costs of receiving the broken item back. Don't describe your item well enough, that's your fault in having someone buying the wrong item. I've been screwed over by sellers a few times on eBay, and I'm glad eBay helps out for my cases.1) Seller sold me a broken TV streaming box listed as NEW, ignored my e-mails. eBay sent me a free return post, and tracked the delivery, and refunded me.2) Seller wasn't happy with my bid on a baby death lens, took my money, closed his account, waited 2 weeks re-listed the item on a new account (account name was almost identical, and the listing was identical word for word), eBay got my money back.3) Bidded on the wrong item, an 450D DSLR, won the auction and was informed by a friend that they told me to get the 550D, explained the situation to the seller, and he wasn't impressed. I told him I'd cover the listing costs, and a little extra for wasting his time (about £15 in all).He gave me some story that his son had already spent the money by the time he read my message.I won the item around 11pm Saturday, and sent the e-mail 1am Sunday and got a response around 10.30am the same day....So after telling him it was going to be my first DSLR, and I made the mistake in numbers, he got £30 out of me for wasting his time. I didn't know what I could've done, because he would've sent the camera to me, and I couldn't say it wasn't as described, and wasn't accepted for returns. So as it was my fault, I took it as a nasty learn the hard way. So I agree that the people who cause the issue should get the problems. But there are a lot of people out there who are genuine and haven't done anything wrong, and get screwed over by these rules. So It's hard to protect everyone.



Wow, I don't normally say this however please can I add you to my 'allow list', you sound like an honest buyer who doesn't seek unjust financial gain.

You were more than generous to give £30. I would have gladly accepted £15. Yet, all I get are abusive messages or ignored when someone bids and changes their mind.
Edited by: "joshp" 13th Aug 2014
its down to the seller to ensure the quality of the products they sell....
the buyer should never be out of pocket... you says theres many dodgy buyers? but to be honest - theres more dodgy sellers especially those on the uk ebay who actually send items from abroad...!!

im in favour of this !
joshp

Wow, I don't normally say this however please can I add you to my 'allow … Wow, I don't normally say this however please can I add you to my 'allow list', you sound like an honest buyer who doesn't seek unjust financial gain. You were more than generous to give £30. I would have gladly accepted £15. Yet, all I get are abusive messages or ignored when someone bids and changes their mind.



It was a bad day, but it was either be sent a £300 or £350 (was 3 years ago, forgot the full cost) camera that was the wrong model or lose £30 and buy the correct camera with the savings.

Felt black mailed into it, but I was more concerned over the remaining money. And as I did offer a small amount of compensation I didn't see ebay helping me out.

But fortunately I got a grey important 550d for a little more. So was settled in the end run.

Just a shame that there are some horrible people on both sides of eBay.
I've pretty much stopped selling on ebay. The scales are tipped far to much to the buyer, trade is supposed to be beneficial to both parties. No doubt most buyers are honest (and sellers) there are of course bad apples on both sides. What you almost never here though is ebay siding with a seller, far to many instances of (eg) buyer claiming they've been sent an empty box, despite packaging being untouched , signed for ok and RM etc weighing in in and out at the correct weight.
I've got a problem ongoing at the moment,I sold some footwear that I'd never worn,a month later the buyer says they have come apart on the soles after a few weeks wear,I told the buyer to return them.

Now the buyer is saying they can send pics,I'm assuming they are after keeping the footwear AND obtaining a refund without returning them.

I wonder what will happen when these new rules come into play,say the buyer returns via RM for instance where the postage is a lot more than Hermes for example,the way they were sent,would I then have to re-imburse a more expensive postal rate.

It wouldn't even be worth selling some items under those circumstances as you could be out a load of money on postage alone.

We brought a brand new dining table and chairs. When it got delivered and I was fitting it 2 of the chairs was damaged, had holes in the back and the other one had been written on which wouldn't come off. Sent pictures of damaged items and seller exchanged both paying for courier. Next time the 2 new chairs, 1 of them was damaged again sent pictures of scuff marks and tear of the chair. Seller said will exchange again, I told him I won't be in on a certain day/time but nevertheless courier came, luckily for them I got held up on the phone so I was still home, ended up they didn't even have the right item they were going to give me a small table so they went away again got in touch with seller he said will exchange again this time told courier I will be out in the morning and be home about 1 pm when pulling up my drive they were at my home just before 12pm. They were on the phone to their boss and I told them your lucky I manage to come home early, this time the chair was new with no damage at all. Overall happy, but it would have been extremely annoyed if I had to have kept paying for the courier delivery when it wasn't even my fault. Sellers should only sell something that is not damage and fully as described. I am aware buyers will/could take advantage but this should only be applicable to buyers with certain amount of positive feedback say 50? So that they are a legitimate customer and also buyer should have to send pictures/video of them opening the item. New regulations should mean new rules for everyone.
deb8z

I've got a problem ongoing at the moment,I sold some footwear that I'd … I've got a problem ongoing at the moment,I sold some footwear that I'd never worn,a month later the buyer says they have come apart on the soles after a few weeks wear,I told the buyer to return them.Now the buyer is saying they can send pics,I'm assuming they are after keeping the footwear AND obtaining a refund without returning them.I wonder what will happen when these new rules come into play,say the buyer returns via RM for instance where the postage is a lot more than Hermes for example,the way they were sent,would I then have to re-imburse a more expensive postal rate.It wouldn't even be worth selling some items under those circumstances as you could be out a load of money on postage alone.



I don't understand how that could justify in a refund, considering that when they received the item they hadn't complained stating the item was damaged. And as not they have managed to use the item for a good few weeks, how are you suppose to give a refund when during those weeks that they wore the item, they could have worn them everyday, walked around in water running on stones scraping the footwear on stones etc so obviously depending on the amount of impact that they did then obviously it would get damaged. Of course if they hardly wore it in those few weeks and just for basic walking now and then then of course I could understand their frustration.
Whenever I purchase an item, I always look at the feedback and the amount and read the feedback a whether negative, positive or neutral and then decide whether to risk buying a potential item from a seller.
just1990

I don't understand how that could justify in a refund, considering that … I don't understand how that could justify in a refund, considering that when they received the item they hadn't complained stating the item was damaged. And as not they have managed to use the item for a good few weeks, how are you suppose to give a refund when during those weeks that they wore the item, they could have worn them everyday, walked around in water running on stones scraping the footwear on stones etc so obviously depending on the amount of impact that they did then obviously it would get damaged. Of course if they hardly wore it in those few weeks and just for basic walking now and then then of course I could understand their frustration. Whenever I purchase an item, I always look at the feedback and the amount and read the feedback a whether negative, positive or neutral and then decide whether to risk buying a potential item from a seller.



That's the problem isn't it,a lot of footwear these days is fashion footwear,they aren't made to last,I didn't manufacture them,don't really see how it's my fault but still I said return them and they don't seem to want to.
deb8z

I've got a problem ongoing at the moment,I sold some footwear that I'd … I've got a problem ongoing at the moment,I sold some footwear that I'd never worn,a month later the buyer says they have come apart on the soles after a few weeks wear,I told the buyer to return them.Now the buyer is saying they can send pics,I'm assuming they are after keeping the footwear AND obtaining a refund without returning them.I wonder what will happen when these new rules come into play,say the buyer returns via RM for instance where the postage is a lot more than Hermes for example,the way they were sent,would I then have to re-imburse a more expensive postal rate.It wouldn't even be worth selling some items under those circumstances as you could be out a load of money on postage alone.



I would assume since the seller is responsible they should pick return delivery. Although i cant see why the buyer should go out of their way to return item to a parcel shop or wait in for courier if they work days so it will be tricky.

I assumed this was always the rule. i would always refund return postage if it was my fault and they asked for it refunded, even if i bought item new and its faulty i am responsible to take it up from where i bought it. Just makes sense.

Edited by: "davidian84" 14th Aug 2014
bonjourhellfire

Distance Selling regulations specify that the seller has to refund, it's … Distance Selling regulations specify that the seller has to refund, it's never been an option, however some of the cowboys on ebay don't play by the books



That's only relevant for items bought at a 'fixed' price. It doesn't apply if you win/buy something via an auction.
davidian84

I would assume since the seller is responsible they should pick return … I would assume since the seller is responsible they should pick return delivery. Although i cant see why the buyer should go out of their way to return item to a parcel shop or wait in for courier if they work days so it will be tricky.I assumed this was always the rule. i would always refund return postage if it was my fault and they asked for it refunded, even if i bought item new and its faulty i am responsible to take it up from where i bought it. Just makes sense.



I can't return them,god knows how long I've had them in my shoe collection X)

But it's a bit much to expect to refund maybe 6 quid for a medium parcel when it only cost less than 3 to send.

I don't think I'll be selling my footwear any longer,it will be too expensive if people moan at me for manufacturing processes.
The one thing I do like with Ebay now is that you can see who has left you low stars,it's not anonymous anymore.
Never heard of a "baby death lens" before X)
Post a comment
Avatar
@
    Text

    Top Discussions

    Top Discussions

    Top Merchants