ebay/royal mail advice needed

7
Found 6th Aug 2017
Hi all,

So I recently sold a commerative coin on eBay, nothing too valuable as sold for £7.

I sent it 1st class signed for, and the recipient signed for the delivery no problems. Buyer is claiming that the envelope was empty, however I have receipt to prove that I sent it with the coin inside (can tell from weight).

What should I do? They signed for it, so I can't claim from royal mail that it is missing, and it's not damaged (can't claim for damage as can't show RM proof it was damaged).

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7 Comments

Ask buyer to report it to their local police on 101 as a theft and supply you with a crime log number. They wont contact you again and the coin will miraculously appear at their address soon after.

Did you wrap the coin to stop it sliding and bursting out the envelope?.

I bought a giftcard off eBay and someone the seller's feedback was brilliant so I honestly think the problem was in transit because when the envelope arrived it was empty and the sticky bit had been lifted and stuck back down.

My point is that not all buyers are out to scam, but when something like this happens the first thought is to blame the buyer. Sometimes things go missing or get stolen within the RM system.

I had a camera stolen after Royal Mail collected it from seller. All I got was the outer box in a post office clear bag saying it came open in transit. Luckily it was replaced. The coin could have been stolen or buyer telling porkies. Their feedback should give you a clue. Did you pack it so it could not be seen that a coin was in envelope? Lots of questions I know but you may not get to the bottom of this.

As above - did you wrap the coin to stop it bursting out of the envelope?

If it was squeezed by the sorting equipment and slid out of the side making a slit, the postie may not have seen the damage. You can ask the buyer to check to see if there is any damage to the envelope.

Coins are not covered by standard post so you won't be able to claim compensation. The buyer could open a case for SNAD (significantly not as described).

Original Poster

The coin was wrapped in tissue paper and the envelope sealed using brown packing tape. Apparently there was no damage to the packaging. I guess there is a chance that it did slide out of the envelope, but I don't see that being very likely because of the brown tape that sealed it.

I totally get that not all buyers are out to scam etc.

Shame that coins are not covered by compensation. Think I'll see what royal mail say (sent them a tweet asking).

Eden003211 h, 22 m ago

The coin was wrapped in tissue paper and the envelope sealed using brown …The coin was wrapped in tissue paper and the envelope sealed using brown packing tape. Apparently there was no damage to the packaging. I guess there is a chance that it did slide out of the envelope, but I don't see that being very likely because of the brown tape that sealed it. I totally get that not all buyers are out to scam etc. Shame that coins are not covered by compensation. Think I'll see what royal mail say (sent them a tweet asking).


I guess you're basically boned if that's all you did to package the coin. In future, wrap the coin in tissue or plastic, securely tape it between a folded sheet of card, seal around the edges of the card with tape, wrap the card with paper to form a makeshift envelope, and fully seal that with tape, too.

The days of mail being sorted by hand are long gone, and mail nowadays is sorted by machines which are designed for flat, flexible paper letters. Putting a loose lump in an envelope and putting it through a modern sorting machine is bound to result in what you've experienced.
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