Electrical advice-how many plugs can I put in a standard double socket

52
Found 11th Jan 2013
Ok I currently have 6 plugs going into one double socket via a 4 pin adaptor and a2 pin adaptor. I have TV and modem plugged into two pin adaptor and blu ray player, sound dock station, sound bar and sky hd plus box in 4 pin adaptor. Would I be able to add a wireless streamer on via another plug. Ie 7 plugs in one double socket. I'm thinking my items don't seem power hungry and it would be ok but I know zilch about electrics. Appreciate advice from anyone in the know
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52 Comments
Tree fiddy
I personally wouldnt, I would purchase a surge protected 8 way extension lead. There is a lot of kit on there that could go bang.
i always use an extension lead if i need more, never use the adapter things, they look way to heave when two or more plugs in it
AndyC1971

I personally wouldnt, I would purchase a surge protected 8 way extension … I personally wouldnt, I would purchase a surge protected 8 way extension lead. There is a lot of kit on there that could go bang.



This solution.
The test is , plug in as many as possible until there is either a fire or the main fuse board blows ... Sorted
AndyC1971

I personally wouldnt, I would purchase a surge protected 8 way extension … I personally wouldnt, I would purchase a surge protected 8 way extension lead. There is a lot of kit on there that could go bang.



Far to sensible ... Reported for giving good advice
AndyC1971

I personally wouldnt, I would purchase a surge protected 8 way extension … I personally wouldnt, I would purchase a surge protected 8 way extension lead. There is a lot of kit on there that could go bang.

ok- what if I went for 6 way surge on one socket and single on the other-would that work-(6way is cheaper to buy) ?
shaman

ok- what if I went for 6 way surge on one socket and single on the … ok- what if I went for 6 way surge on one socket and single on the other-would that work-(6way is cheaper to buy) ?



Nope, 1 socket per electrical appliance, and surge protected. Look at it this way, for the sake of about £30 no fires, no blown expensive electrical items.

dog_cop, only sensible because there are no posts to cause mischief, well there is one........X)
Not really to do with number of plugs but total load on the socket/wiring. Most electronics without screens have low power needs. Tv is usually one of the biggest loads. You need to look at each item and then add up the requirements to see how much is being pulled through the socket
If you want to connect more devices, take plugs off all but 2 and just push the wires in the socket with the remaining plugs.
ScubaDudes

If you want to connect more devices, take plugs off all but 2 and just … If you want to connect more devices, take plugs off all but 2 and just push the wires in the socket with the remaining plugs.

should I do that while standing in a tin bucket of water ?
shaman

should I do that while standing in a tin bucket of water ?



For the full experience you want a copper pot.
AndyC1971

Nope, 1 socket per electrical appliance, and surge protected. Look at it … Nope, 1 socket per electrical appliance, and surge protected. Look at it this way, for the sake of about £30 no fires, no blown expensive electrical items.dog_cop, only sensible because there are no posts to cause mischief, well there is one........X)

thank -I will follow ur advice
I wish my deals got this much attention
Surge protectors do not guarantee against fires, there is a lot of current running through that socket but it should cope with the draw, as long as you just use proper 4/6/8 gang extensions.
shaman

I wish my deals got this much attention



I usually take the mickey, but am in an unusual helpful mood tonight, now I am really scared oO

TBH, I expect your deals are a bit pants!! X)
shaman

I wish my deals got this much attention



Post them in misk and they would.

You should have worked in something about asylum seekers or benefits, **** would have got crazy then
your main concern is load (total number of amps)

your "ring main" socket is generally 15amp (or possibly more depending on how your home is wired and protected (main fuse)

then the "ring main" socket could be separately fused to 13amps - which is what you should base your total amps on

therefore you should not exceed a total of 13amps in any one socket (generally speaking)

for the sake of safety and as rightly stated previously - having even 6 plugs, in adapters, is "over stepping" the mark - your protection (to both home and the device) is limited.

Edited by: "philphil61" 11th Jan 2013
so if you plug in one extension with 6 sockets on how is this different, sorry sound right dumb ass, but thats what i have
It all depends on the amount of power drawn by each plugged in appliance, if you for instance plugged in 6 x table lamps with 60 watt bulbs that is only 360 watts and quite safe, however if you plugged in 6 x 3kw ( 3000 watts ) kettles, that would be 18000 watts and a disaster.
september_boy

Your text here


so i need to unscrew and see what amp is in each plug? and it needs to add to 15 yeah
sassie

so if you plug in one extension with 6 sockets on how is this different, … so if you plug in one extension with 6 sockets on how is this different, sorry sound right dumb ass, but thats what i have



Ring main allows current to be drawn from two directions, effectively halfing the electricity being drawn through each wire thus allowing double the electricity to be used safely without "melting" the wiring. Once you come out of a socket all the load is going down one wire so unless that is a high rated cable (industrial) then it is roughly the ability to take half (with cheaply made materials prob less) the load of the ring main. Similar issue if you use a permenent spur.
jeeze you lot in lamens terms, whats the point of extension leads if you cant use the sockets?
sassie

so i need to unscrew and see what amp is in each plug? and it needs to … so i need to unscrew and see what amp is in each plug? and it needs to add to 15 yeah

yes just asked a sparky friend
september_boy

yes just asked a sparky friend


well thats a bit pintless i think all my plugs are 13 or 15 amp, will have a look tomorow
sassie

jeeze you lot in lamens terms, whats the point of extension leads if you … jeeze you lot in lamens terms, whats the point of extension leads if you cant use the sockets?



I did try to explain in " laymans " terms sassie, most items have a wattage rating marked on them.
Inactive

I did try to explain in " laymans " terms sassie, most items have a … I did try to explain in " laymans " terms sassie, most items have a wattage rating marked on them.


do they, what on the plug? think maybe my extensions maybe over loaded then, thought that the idea of them

maybe need my brother to come and check them all
Edited by: "sassie" 12th Jan 2013
It's not about what fuse is in the plug, it's the current draw of the device, things like routers take very little, even tvs shouldn't exceed 300 watts, its when you start putting in heaters and very high powered sound systems in that causes most issues.
sassie

do they, what on the plug? think maybe my extensions maybe over loaded … do they, what on the plug? think maybe my extensions maybe over loaded then, thought that the idea of them maybe need my brother to come and check them all




Not on the plug, usually on the actual item, for instance, if you empty your kettle, turn it upside down and you will probably see 2200 watts or perhaps 3kw ( which is 3000watts ) The majority of items will be rated at far less than this.
ojh the only heater i got is in its own socket, as is kettle, the tv, freeview, wii and dvd player on own circut, the only extension with like six sockets on has laptops on it, home phone, house alarm, router and our phone chargers, son has 4 on his, he as got tv, playstation and blu ray player in, does that all sound ok

Edited by: "sassie" 12th Jan 2013
As philphil says^^, it's the current drawn that matters.
On any one 'ordinary' socket, you shouldn't go above 15amps current drawn.

The amount of current depends on the appliance and the voltage. Here in the UK the voltage is 230 volts, so to find the current you divide the wattage of the appliance by 230; this gives you a figure in amps..

Things that heat stuff up use loads of energy so kettles and the like draw a high current, other electrical items only draw a low current.
A quick wiki -
The current drawn by a number of typical appliances are:
22-inch/56-centimeter Portable Television (35 W): 150 mA
Tungsten light bulb (60–100 W): 250–450 mA
Compact Fluorescent Lamp (13–30 W): 58–112 mA
Toaster, kettle (2 kW): 9 A
Immersion heater (4.6 kW): 20 A

Add up the current drawn by all the things that you have got plugged into your socket either directly or via an extension and then you 'll know if it's OK!!

A quicker way is to plug them all in and if the fuse doesn't blow/the wall doesn't explode/a fire doesn't start than the current is lower!!

You probably know instinctively anyway. You wouldn't have a washer and a tumble dryer working at the same time on one socket would you ?
chesso

As philphil says^^, it's the current drawn that matters. On any one … As philphil says^^, it's the current drawn that matters. On any one 'ordinary' socket, you shouldn't go above 15amps current drawn. The amount of current depends on the appliance and the voltage. Here in the UK the voltage is 230 volts, so to find the current you divide the wattage of the appliance by 230; this gives you a figure in amps..Things that heat stuff up use loads of energy so kettles and the like draw a high current, other electrical items only draw a low current.A quick wiki - The current drawn by a number of typical appliances are: 22-inch/56-centimeter Portable Television (35 W): 150 mA Tungsten light bulb (60–100 W): 250–450 mA Compact Fluorescent Lamp (13–30 W): 58–112 mA Toaster, kettle (2 kW): 9 A Immersion heater (4.6 kW): 20 AAdd up the current drawn by all the things that you have got plugged into your socket either directly or via an extension and then you 'll know if it's OK!!A quicker way is to plug them all in and if the fuse doesn't blow/the wall doesn't explode/a fire doesn't start than the current is lower!!You probably know instinctively anyway. You wouldn't have a washer and a tumble dryer working at the same time on one socket would you ?


errrrrrmmmmmm no, only when i forget i am not supposed to
sassie

errrrrrmmmmmm no, only when i forget i am not supposed to



I know what you mean X)
chesso

I know what you mean X)


my brother tells me off everytime he sees me ( enter embarrassed face)
That's a bit harsh of him.
chesso

That's a bit harsh of him.


i think it only cause he cares, and me forgets, he says its cause i dont listen, i do i just forget or need the clothes washing and drying at same time lol
sassie

ojh the only heater i got is in its own socket, as is kettle, the tv, … ojh the only heater i got is in its own socket, as is kettle, the tv, freeview, wii and dvd player on own circut, the only extension with like six sockets on has laptops on it, home phone, house alarm, router and our phone chargers, son has 4 on his, he as got tv, playstation and blu ray player in, does that all sound ok



That all sounds OK to me sassie.(_;)

You can sleep tonight.
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