Epson printers End of Service Life Help needed!

8 replies
Found 29th Jul 2009
I have an Epson RX560 which Ive had for about 4 years and a PX800FW which is about 5 months old and hardly used.

I use the RX560 every day. I make personalised cards so its printing about 1000 cards per week. and yesterday my rollers were dirty so i went on epsons website to see if I could clean. About half an hour later i get a message saying my printer is at end of service life which is fair enough as its well used. I chatted to epson and they offered me the same printer brand new for £30 which 1 year warranty. Which I was really happy about because its the best printer for doing my cards. H said it would take too weeks to come which is fine coz I thought id just use the PX800FW instead.

The card tends to jam in this and doesnt print skin tones as nice even tho it uses exact same catridges. but start using this any way and printed about 100 cards and the same thing happens! End of service life. We paid over £200 for it about 5 months ago and up until last night it was used now and again to print one sheet of labels or a letter.

I find this a bit strange - can epson send a message to you printer to make it do this so you have to buy another one?

Any help would be great & rep would be left

Sorry for this being so long

Oh the other thing! I have instant replacement on the RX560 (the old one) with pc world . does anyone know if this covers end of service life?

8 Comments

this utility can turn off the message
ssclg.com/eps…tml

Original Poster

Thanks but I already downloaded that- they dont support either of my printers!

Banned

Sale of Goods Act Fact Sheet
Subject:
Sale of Goods Act, Faulty Goods.

Relevant or Related Legislation:
Sale of Goods Act 1979. Supply of Goods and Services Act 1982. Sale and Supply of Goods Act 1994. The Sale and Supply of Goods to Consumers Regulations 2002.

Key Facts:
• Wherever goods are bought they must "conform to contract". This means they must be as described, fit for purpose and of satisfactory quality (i.e. not inherently faulty at the time of sale).

• Goods are of satisfactory quality if they reach the standard that a reasonable person would regard as satisfactory, taking into account the price and any description.

• Aspects of quality include fitness for purpose, freedom from minor defects, appearance and finish, durability and safety.

• It is the seller, not the manufacturer, who is responsible if goods do not conform to contract.

• If goods do not conform to contract at the time of sale, purchasers can request their money back "within a reasonable time". (This is not defined and will depend on circumstances)

• For up to six years after purchase (five years from discovery in Scotland) purchasers can demand damages (which a court would equate to the cost of a repair or replacement).

• A purchaser who is a consumer, i.e. is not buying in the course of a business, can alternatively request a repair or replacement.

• If repair and replacement are not possible or too costly, then the consumer can seek a partial refund, if they have had some benefit from the good, or a full refund if the fault/s have meant they have enjoyed no benefit

• In general, the onus is on all purchasers to prove the goods did not conform to contract (e.g. was inherently faulty) and should have reasonably lasted until this point in time (i.e. perishable goods do not last for six years).

• If a consumer chooses to request a repair or replacement, then for the first six months after purchase it will be for the retailer to prove the goods did conform to contract (e.g. were not inherently faulty)

• After six months and until the end of the six years, it is for the consumer to prove the lack of conformity.



:santa::thumbsup:

Banned

Your name
First line of address
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Fourth line of address
Contact telephone number
Owner/Manager’s name
First line of company address
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Today’s date

Dear Sir/Madam,

RE: Faulty goods and the Sale of Goods Act 1979 (as amended)

On [date of purchase] I bought a [description of purchase] from you for [insert price] which has stopped working.

The problem is [enter description of fault].

The Sale of Goods Act 1979 (as amended) states that when a consumer buys goods from a trader they must be: as described; of a satisfactory quality; and fit for the purpose made known at the time of sale by you or the seller.

This legislation also states that the seller, not the manufacturer, is legally obliged to sort out a problem if the goods do not meet these requirements.

The law also says I have six years from the date of purchase to claim damages for faulty goods.

My goods are not [delete as appropriate - as described/fit for purpose/of satisfactory quality] and I wish to claim a [delete as appropriate - repair/replacement/refund] of my goods under the Sale of Goods Act 1979 as amended.

Please respond to my complaint within 7 days from receipt of this letter.

Yours faithfully,
[your name]

Banned

Your name
First line of address
Second line of address
Third line of address
Fourth line of address
Contact telephone number
Owner/Manager’s name
First line of company address
Second line of company address
Third line of company address
Fourth line of company address

Today’s date

Dear Sir/Madam,

RE: Faulty goods and the Sale of Goods Act 1979 (as amended)

On [date of purchase] I bought a [description of purchase] from you for [insert price] which has stopped working.

The problem is [enter description of fault].

The Sale of Goods Act 1979 (as amended) states that when a consumer buys goods from a trader they must be: as described; of a satisfactory quality; and fit for the purpose made known at the time of sale by you or the seller.

This legislation also states that the seller, not the manufacturer, is legally obliged to sort out a problem if the goods do not meet these requirements.

The Sale of Goods Act 1979 (as amended) says: if goods break within the first six months after purchase then there is a presumption the goods were faulty when sold.

My goods are not [delete as appropriate - as described/fit for purpose/of satisfactory quality] and I wish to claim a [delete as appropriate - repair/replacement/refund] of my goods under the Sale of Goods Act 1979 as amended.

Please respond to my complaint within 7 days from receipt of this letter.

Yours faithfully,
[your name]

Seen this alot on the Epson's ,the 2 top red led's flash alternately but mainly older models and the service software someone mentioned normally sorts it out . I think Epson have a cheek to do this .

Original Poster

Just a quick update

Chatted to epson and they said if I took the newer printer to one of their epson express places they would fix free of charge.

Gave them a call to check and they said they would repair ubder warranty but because I used compatable inks if it happens again my warranty will be voided! Got it done anyway and they also fixed my other printer for £15 . Took them about 20 mins.

Tried to blame on the compatables though even the though the compatable ink company are saying its all rubbish

Both printers now sorted anyway! Rep left for all who helped
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