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    ethernet switch

    My son uses a powerline adapter to get internet for his PC in his bedroom. He wants to use ethernet for his TV, Sky box and Xbox One.
    Can I use one of these amazon.co.uk/gp/…-21 to do this? Is it as simple as running a cable from the powerline adapter to the switch, then ethernet cables from the switch to the devices? If so, will they all work at the same time?
    Thanks

    18 Comments

    Yep. This should work just fine.

    Original Poster

    drmsa

    Yep. This should work just fine.


    Thanks

    Is there such a thing as an ethernet splitter that turns 1 ethernet cable into 2 ?

    brendanhickey

    ​do you have an old router. it will be better. Switches are mainly for c … ​do you have an old router. it will be better. Switches are mainly for computers communicating with each other. routers are for connecting to the outside. a Switch will work fine but an old router will work just as good.this will also be fine. u don't need a Gigabyte switch if ur only after an Internet connection.



    Routers are for devices to communicate on the local area network.

    Modems talk to the outside world.

    As above tho OP a router would be more sufficient, or even new power line adapters with multiple RJ45 sockets. My powerline adapters have 3 sockets.

    I would avoid switches, if your going down that route might as well just switch the Ethernet cable as needed.

    jco83

    Is there such a thing as an ethernet splitter that turns 1 ethernet cable … Is there such a thing as an ethernet splitter that turns 1 ethernet cable into 2 ?



    ​Yes, but no - they only work if you have a similar setup at the other end of the cable. It wouldn't do what you want. I'd recommend getting an ethernet switch.

    I use this one with power line sockets, works great and isn't too big.

    amazon.co.uk/gp/…c=1

    An Ethernet switch is exactly what you need, and for the sake of a few quid more, you might as well go for 1000mps. Something like this

    njpugh90

    ​Yes, but no - they only work if you have a similar setup at the other e … ​Yes, but no - they only work if you have a similar setup at the other end of the cable. It wouldn't do what you want. I'd recommend getting an ethernet switch.


    I looked into it and found there is such a thing. amazon.co.uk/gp/…MIE (cheaper available)
    And from people's comments it would do exactly what I want, only working for 1 connected device at a time

    murphy0207

    I use this one with power line sockets, works great and isn't too … I use this one with power line sockets, works great and isn't too big.https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/aw/d/B000FNFSPY/ref=yo_ii_img?ie=UTF8&psc=1


    I use this one too! Works great.
    amazon.co.uk/gp/…c=1

    The main thing, is there already a router - if this was powerlined to a single device from a modem, then a router would be needed.
    Otherwise, using a router on top of another router complicates things, even more so when there is a console that has particular NAT requirements.
    If you chain routers (router 1 to WLAN on router 2), then you have one network that is inside another. To cheat and use a spare router as a switch, it has to be set up in a pretty specific way, and connected using one of the LAN ports instead of WAN.

    The line of least resistance for the XBOX is to use a switch, and either:
    1. Use the router "DHCP reservation" (if available) to give a known address to the XBOX
    2. Manually set the XBOX IP address to one that is within the LAN range, but preferably out of the router's auto allocate range.
    Then set the router to put that address as the DMZ.

    If the Router is XBOX friendly, then those steps may not be needed.

    PS. "Switch" actually means a switching hub - the old hub simply replicated all traffic to all ports.
    A switching hub replicates "broadcast" protocols that are addressed "to anything on this network", but limits other traffic from appearing on other ports - so separate traffic could go from port 1 to port 2 and from port 3 to line without congestion, where on a simple hub, they would contend for the same throughput - just like everything contends for the line throuput

    Edited by: "matth9999" 28th Dec 2016

    OP's first choice will be fine, uplink from powerline into switch,then pc,tv,sky and xbox into switch as well.maybe a some ethernet cables to order along with switch?
    Edited by: "Tapper51" 28th Dec 2016

    Tapper51

    OP's first choice will be fine, uplink from powerline into switch,then … OP's first choice will be fine, uplink from powerline into switch,then pc,tv,sky and xbox into switch as well.maybe a some ethernet cables to order along with switch?


    definitely agree, ethernet switch is what is needed, there are a few comments above which are wrong and are only confusing the issue

    matth9999

    The main thing, is there already a router - if this was powerlined to a … The main thing, is there already a router - if this was powerlined to a single device from a modem, then a router would be needed.Otherwise, using a router on top of another router complicates things, even more so when there is a console that has particular NAT requirements.If you chain routers (router 1 to WLAN on router 2), then you have one network that is inside another. To cheat and use a spare router as a switch, it has to be set up in a pretty specific way, and connected using one of the LAN ports instead of WAN.The line of least resistance for the XBOX is to use a switch, and either:1. Use the router "DHCP reservation" (if available) to give a known address to the XBOX2. Manually set the XBOX IP address to one that is within the LAN range, but preferably out of the router's auto allocate range.Then set the router to put that address as the DMZ.If the Router is XBOX friendly, then those steps may not be needed.PS. "Switch" actually means a switching hub - the old hub simply replicated all traffic to all ports.A switching hub replicates "broadcast" protocols that are addressed "to anything on this network", but limits other traffic from appearing on other ports - so separate traffic could go from port 1 to port 2 and from port 3 to line without congestion, where on a simple hub, they would contend for the same throughput - just like everything contends for the line throuput



    ​In a nutshell, the OP needs a switch.

    jco83

    Is there such a thing as an ethernet splitter that turns 1 ethernet cable … Is there such a thing as an ethernet splitter that turns 1 ethernet cable into 2 ?



    You wouldn't want one even if there was such a thing. You'll end up having data packets clashing and getting lost as your connected devices won't know where to send the data.

    murphy0207

    I use this one with power line sockets, works great and isn't too … I use this one with power line sockets, works great and isn't too big.https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/aw/d/B000FNFSPY/ref=yo_ii_img?ie=UTF8&psc=1



    I also use this, streaming sky off PS4 and downloading on PC.

    No issues to date

    jco83

    I looked into it and found there is such a thing. … I looked into it and found there is such a thing. https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/aw/d/B015KN2MIE (cheaper available)And from people's comments it would do exactly what I want, only working for 1 connected device at a time



    "IMPORTANT - These devices are intended to split VOICE (Pins 4,5,7,8) and Ethernet Half Duplex (Pins 1,2,3,6) down one Cat 5 Cable. NOT 2 x Half Duplex Ethernet. You can Share a Telephone and a PC down one cable "

    It's a somewhat specialist bit of kit. Networking is a two way signal, so it makes no sense to split it as you would a video signal where there's a definitely source and sink.

    For almost all uses including the OP's you need a switch.

    EndlessWaves

    "IMPORTANT - These devices are intended to split VOICE (Pins 4,5,7,8) and … "IMPORTANT - These devices are intended to split VOICE (Pins 4,5,7,8) and Ethernet Half Duplex (Pins 1,2,3,6) down one Cat 5 Cable. NOT 2 x Half Duplex Ethernet. You can Share a Telephone and a PC down one cable "It's a somewhat specialist bit of kit. Networking is a two way signal, so it makes no sense to split it as you would a video signal where there's a definitely source and sink. For almost all uses including the OP's you need a switch.


    People's reviews say these works if you only have 1 of your 2 connected devices switched on at a time. Is this correct or are the people lying ?
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