Extending WiFi

9
Posted 30th Apr
Hi

Need a little help here.

So friend got a BT business smart hub “link

But the WiFi is not getting to the other side of building, Rough guess of under 40metres. With some walls, So asked me to help them extend it.

But I don’t really have much knowledge of WiFi routers and such, as I never had much problems with it.

Should a single WiFi extender be good enough?
Or would mesh setup be better?

Want to get and buy a extender and try 1st,
But pcworld doesn’t seems to accept opened returns.

Any other retailers I can try?
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9 Comments
Try a powerline adapter.
Best not do a half baked job and do it right.
Does he have the option to run some cabling to Wireless Access Points? If so get something like Ubiquiti AP Lite 2 or 3 of them and spread them evenly round the building.

You could get something like the BT Wi-fi 3 pack. It will work wirelessly but won’t be quite as good.

A normal wireless extender is unlikely to do that good a job over 40m.
I just use old BT hubs and turn off the dhcp and use powerline to the garage and ethernet throughout the house. Three hubs in the house and one in the garage covers everywhere and lots of the garden

this covers it
Edited by: "Quinoa" 30th Apr
Oneday7730/04/2019 12:36

Best not do a half baked job and do it right. Does he have the option to …Best not do a half baked job and do it right. Does he have the option to run some cabling to Wireless Access Points? If so get something like Ubiquiti AP Lite 2 or 3 of them and spread them evenly round the building. You could get something like the BT Wi-fi 3 pack. It will work wirelessly but won’t be quite as good. A normal wireless extender is unlikely to do that good a job over 40m.


What he said, you can always run external cat5/6 outside if the router is in a room with an outside wall.

Ubiquiti do a number of Access Point, you could start with one
Where does it drop off, as a wireless extender has to be within the circle of coverage of the router, and then projects an overlapping circle of coverage around itself... for mesh devices, repeat until destination.
In short, if the signal gets to halfway, a single extender at the halfway mark may cover it - if the signal does not usably reach halfway, then it will either have to be a multi-hop mesh, or one or more access points fed by cable or powerline.

A powerline Wifi gets the source by powerline transmission, and projects coverage that does not have to 50% overlap the existing coverage, and also does not lose out on Wifi throughput by repeating, however, building wiring may be a problem if the circuit the router and first part of the powerline link is on, is separated by a lot of wire from the circuit the destination is on.

Which leaves the best, but installation required solution, of running ethernet cable to reach an access point (or router converted to access point, or extender with AP mode).
Some extenders, not always the expensive ones, may be "tri-mode", as well as Wifi extender, they support client mode (convert Wifi to wired) and AP mode (convert wired to Wifi) - I have a cheap one that supports all 3 modes.

PS. You might be able to get away with a return to Argos, though it does say "unused" - so to get away with returning if it proves unsuitable, you'd have to be sure to use the reset option to remove any settings made, and repack it the way it was.
Edited by: "matth9999" 30th Apr
I am sure BT offer a package where you are guaranteed wifi signal in all of your house and if not they give you a AP (you can get up to 3 AP to cover your house) think they called it "Complete" or "Complete Wi-Fi to guarantee "
I read this about a year ago and at the time i think it was a extra £5 PCM but thought it was free now.

One of my AP (gaming router) packed in. and I ended up finding a old sky router (i did mod with stuff from my old router/ap) and used this as back up and set it up like what Quinoa said above.


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Edited by: "Mackan" 1st May
4Real201630/04/2019 16:38

What he said, you can always run external cat5/6 outside if the router is …What he said, you can always run external cat5/6 outside if the router is in a room with an outside wall.Ubiquiti do a number of Access Point, you could start with one


I would of said spent the extra and use cat 7 cable if you are laying a cable.

but see below on what cable will be suite your needs.

Cat 5 Ethernet cable is typically too slow for business networks, allowing the user to transmit up to 100 Mb/second speed at 100 Mhz.
Cat 5e Ethernet cable allows up to 1 Gb/s internet speed with 100 Mhz.
Cat 6 Ethernet cable allows up to 10 Gb/s with cable lengths up to 55 meters at 250 Mhz.
Cat 7 Ethernet cable is the newest cable category, operating at speeds of 10 Gb/s at 100 meters of cable and transmitting frequencies up to 600 Mhz.
Mackan1 h, 20 m ago

I would of said spent the extra and use cat 7 cable if you are laying a …I would of said spent the extra and use cat 7 cable if you are laying a cable. but see below on what cable will be suite your needs. [Image] Cat 5 Ethernet cable is typically too slow for business networks, allowing the user to transmit up to 100 Mb/second speed at 100 Mhz. Cat 5e Ethernet cable allows up to 1 Gb/s internet speed with 100 Mhz. Cat 6 Ethernet cable allows up to 10 Gb/s with cable lengths up to 55 meters at 250 Mhz. Cat 7 Ethernet cable is the newest cable category, operating at speeds of 10 Gb/s at 100 meters of cable and transmitting frequencies up to 600 Mhz.


I won't argue with that as I was actually thinking Cat 5e, you would be hard pressed to find Cat 5 external cable, I would use Cat 6 but even that's overkill given broadband speeds.

Most good quality Cat 5 cable these days do run at higher speeds than their rated specification.
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