Faulty LG OLED television over 12 month warranty

18
Found 3rd Jul
Hi all,

Looking for a bit of advice but may have just just follow the retailers flow.. I've had a 55 inch LG OLED I bough through Argos last year for around 1 year and 20 odd days now. Whilst watching this morning we had a message stating there was an update available at which point all the sockets downstairs tripped. Everything has come back on aside from the television, tried replacing the fuse like for like which has made zero difference.

Spoke with Argos who advise they wouldn't do anything as outside the warranty period, I briefly mentioned the SOGA and they advised that they would require an independent report arranged and costed by me before they would consider..

I've then spoken with LG who advise that as it's outwith the 12 month duration they are unwilling to do anything about it and I'd have to pay just shy of £400 for a repair.

I'm awaiting a callback from the CAB now to see if they can also advise, however is there any specific acts I should be quoting or referencing when speaking with retailer/manufacturer and is it reasonable to ask for an independent report from me? I don't understand what they expect to ascertain from this seeing as the television just sits idle on the other side of the room.

Any advice appreciated (except "don't buy a television from Argos / without extended warranty" or "don't buy an LG").
Community Updates
18 Comments
SOGA has been replaced by Consumer Rights Act 2015. Generalisation of legal requirements is that 6 months after purchase any faults claimed to be due to faulty parts / manufacturing need to be proven by customer to be present at time of inheriting ownership of the product (generally day of purchase, depending on any order / delivery timeframe) and claimed against retailer, not manufacturer. The cost of a credible independent professional assessor to show faulty parts / manufacture may be recoverable from the retailer - if the fault is proven. Decent guide with letter template at which.co.uk/con…act
AndyRoyd3 m ago

SOGA has been replaced by Consumer Rights Act 2015. Generalisation of …SOGA has been replaced by Consumer Rights Act 2015. Generalisation of legal requirements is that 6 months after purchase any faults claimed to be due to faulty parts / manufacturing need to be proven by customer to be present at time of inheriting ownership of the product (generally day of purchase, depending on any order / delivery timeframe) and claimed against retailer, not manufacturer. The cost of a credible independent professional assessor to show faulty parts / manufacture may be recoverable from the retailer - if the fault is proven. Decent guide with letter template at https://www.which.co.uk/consumer-rights/regulation/consumer-rights-act


Thanks for your help, looks like I will have to follow this route.
Might be a daft question but have you tried another plug socket?.
.MUFC.9 m ago

Might be a daft question but have you tried another plug socket?.


Yep, still no joy unfortunately
If all the sockets downstairs tripped then it sound like you had a power surge, this may have blown up the PSU in the TV so this wouldn't be covered my a manufacturers warranty or your consumer rights anyway, obviously this is just a guess but without an engineer inspecting the TV you wont know.
paulj482 m ago

If all the sockets downstairs tripped then it sound like you had a power …If all the sockets downstairs tripped then it sound like you had a power surge, this may have blown up the PSU in the TV so this wouldn't be covered my a manufacturers warranty or your consumer rights anyway, obviously this is just a guess but without an engineer inspecting the TV you wont know.


Was plugged into a surge protector so I'd like to think this isn't the case.
thrustmaster1 m ago

Was plugged into a surge protector so I'd like to think this isn't the …Was plugged into a surge protector so I'd like to think this isn't the case.



so tottaly dead or you still have a standby light on?
paulj4810 m ago

so tottaly dead or you still have a standby light on?


No standby light, could be a coincidence but a prompt appeared advising an update would be applied when the television is reset just seconds before it all went off. Surge protector light is still showing operational and nothing else on the gang has been impacted or affected including the LG soundbar.
Edited by: "thrustmaster" 3rd Jul
thrustmaster1 h, 3 m ago

No standby light, could be a coincidence but a prompt appeared advising an …No standby light, could be a coincidence but a prompt appeared advising an update would be applied when the television is reset just seconds before it all went off. Surge protector light is still showing operational and nothing else on the gang has been impacted or affected including the LG soundbar.


No standby light shows the PSU at fault (at a minimum)
I was going to advise disconnecting everything (HDMI’s etc.) and then see if the TV will boot as sometimes a faulty lead or other can stop a TV from starting. If it’s dead other than the plug top fuse then there’s not a lot more you can check, engineer time it it
paulj481 h, 30 m ago

If all the sockets downstairs tripped then it sound like you had a power …If all the sockets downstairs tripped then it sound like you had a power surge, this may have blown up the PSU in the TV so this wouldn't be covered my a manufacturers warranty or your consumer rights anyway, obviously this is just a guess but without an engineer inspecting the TV you wont know.


Or the opposite. My initial thought was the TV may have had an issue that caused the trip. This would be in OPs favour in respect of likelihood of retailer repair at no cost. Obviously professional opinion required.
Assuming that you paid for the TV by credit card you can give the card issuer a call and talk to them about making a 'section 75' claim.

Do not go into detail on what happened, just give them the facts. Tell them that the TV is not turning on any more, that it is less than 13 months old and that the retailer and manufacturer are refusing to repair/replace it for free due to the expired 12 months warranty.
Edited by: "SUMMONER" 3rd Jul
SUMMONER52 m ago

Assuming that you paid for the TV by credit card you can give the card …Assuming that you paid for the TV by credit card you can give the card issuer a call and talk to them about making a 'section 75' claim.Do not go into detail on what happened, just give them the facts. Tell them that the TV is not turning on any more, that it is less than 13 months old and that the retailer and manufacturer are refusing to repair/replace it for free due to the expired 12 months warranty.


Debit card unfortunately it would seem
thrustmaster11 m ago

Debit card unfortunately it would seem


In that case I foresee you writing formal letters to both the Argos and LG customer relations departments, urging them to realise it is completely unreasonable for such an expensive appliance to fail after such a short period of time.
Or may be try a shortcut, by posting a message to their respective Facebook pages, asking them if they really think it is reasonable for a > £1000 TV to fail after less than 13 months.

For the future, always do a split payment. £1 with a credit card and then pay the balance as you wish. This way you have additional recourse via the credit card issuer and it does not cost you anything extra.
Edited by: "SUMMONER" 3rd Jul
SUMMONER1 h, 23 m ago

Assuming that you paid for the TV by credit card you can give the card …Assuming that you paid for the TV by credit card you can give the card issuer a call and talk to them about making a 'section 75' claim.Do not go into detail on what happened, just give them the facts. Tell them that the TV is not turning on any more, that it is less than 13 months old and that the retailer and manufacturer are refusing to repair/replace it for free due to the expired 12 months warranty.


SUMMONER25 m ago

...For the future, always do a split payment. £1 with a credit card and …...For the future, always do a split payment. £1 with a credit card and then pay the balance as you wish. This way you have additional recourse via the credit card issuer and it does not cost you anything extra.


Would have been no real benefit to S75 in this case as the card co simply replicates the retailer's obligations = the same 12m warranty period with the same post-6months purchase "prove it" requirement. For the brave: S75 would have provided another entity to sue if the retailer declined to accept any credible professional opinion
AndyRoyd3 h, 56 m ago

Would have been no real benefit to S75 in this case as the card co simply …Would have been no real benefit to S75 in this case as the card co simply replicates the retailer's obligations = the same 12m warranty period with the same post-6months purchase "prove it" requirement. For the brave: S75 would have provided another entity to sue if the retailer declined to accept any credible professional opinion


There is of course no guarantee that the card company will do anything. However my experience from being both on the side of the reseller and that of the customer is that the credit card companies more often than not side with the customer.

In this case I would expect the card company to side with the customer, since the product has not lasted even close to anyone's reasonable amount of time.

Back in the day I have had 2 years old MacBooks and iMacs returned for a refund, because they developed a fault and the customer did not want to deal with Apple/us (the retailer).
Edited by: "SUMMONER" 3rd Jul
SUMMONER1 h, 21 m ago

There is of course no guarantee that the card company will do anything. …There is of course no guarantee that the card company will do anything. However my experience from being both on the side of the reseller and that of the customer is that the credit card companies more often than not side with the customer.In this case I would expect the card company to side with the customer, since the product has not lasted even close to anyone's reasonable amount of time.Back in the day I have had 2 years old MacBooks and iMacs returned for a refund, because they developed a fault and the customer did not want to deal with Apple/us (the retailer).



You are making the assumption that the OP is being completely forthright in disclosure but i think given the cost the ccc may not easily settle and if pushed, employ an engineer themselves f the OP kicks up enough stink.
If the engineer finds other reasons for the fault, such as the power outage during a firmware update he will of course deny a manufacturing fault hence the OP may be stuck with a bill for this and I suspect the ccc will indeed pursue a reclaim of that amount from the OP.
I personally would not argue with the obvious description and cause of fault and claim on my house insurance as a unfortunate incident, if they want to employ and engineer to prove things let them..
Have a look at this thread OP.
Edited by: "SUMMONER" 12th Jul
SUMMONER12th Jul

Have a look at this thread OP.


Thanks for your help and comments everyone, funnily enough this is what I had done just last week (emailing the CEO) and I promptly had a response offering a replacement television up to same value or a refund. As no OLED televisions were in stock at the time I opted for a refund and purchased elsewhere with a longer guarantee this time round

Good result, shame that it was such a battle with customer services and LG are frankly awful.
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