First steps when planning on an extension at home

5
Posted 7th Jan
Me and my girlfriend are looking at placing an extension on to our home mainly to make the downstairs have more room and a larger kitchen. Dependant on cost possibly a double to increase room size upstairs also.

Could people recommend any useful hints/tips when getting the “ball rolling” with something like this as it is brand new to us both. Ideally whatever we spend has to add at least the same value on to our home.

Thank you in advance. Any help would be gravely appreciated.
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do your own simple sketches of what you want.
talk to a few builders for very rough comments/estimates - find out from builders whether the know structural designers/architects who can provide sufficient quality plans for your local authority planning dept.
talk to planning dept - they may know of builders/architects etc - if not just see a few plans currently going through - they will have details on them
talk to neighbours - not too early in the process but not too late either
factor in fitting out costs of new rooms
talk to current lender - they have a vested interest
don't discount moving instead
First step is to find out if you will get planning permission and building regs approval for the extension

Second step would be to get an estimate of the build cost

Third step would be to get the house valued with and without the extension if you want to work out if the extension costs will be recovered in the increase of the house value. This is often tough and most people will spend more money on an extension than what they will get back in the increase of the value of their homes and they do it because of a lifestyle choice more than anything else.
We got architect. Something like £600 to draw plans and £1000 to draw and get passed so we did that. Builders will pick up on planning application and send you information packs or go find your own builder. Most builders work with architect so you can go with builder first for free advice and recommendation for drawing plans. My advice. Start the ball rolling now in Jan. Sooner the better. Get money sorted ready. Maybe consider self storage for a few months when building is taking place as we did.
Edited by: "wayners" 7th Jan
Whatever you do, design and make the foundations and ground floor walls capable of supporting a second floor. That way, as i and a few other people I know have done, if you can only do the ground floor now, when you come to do the second floor you wont have to rip the whole lot down. You can just remove the roof and build the second storey on top and then put roof back.

But to answer the question

*Rough plan yourself
*Pre-app advice with council regarding permission.
*Architect drawings
*Full Planning Permission Application
*Building Control Pre-App advice
*Building control application
*Builders quotes
*Builder starts work
*Probably 6-9 visits by various people to site to sign off bits for mortgage company (not yours but when you come to sell it who ever buys it will want to know that part of the house is mortgageable).
*Building control visits.
*Builder finishes
*Snagging issues rectified.
*Electrical certs/gas certs/building control certs etc all gathered
*Divorce.

Edited by: "ArcadeAssassin" 7th Jan
ArcadeAssassin07/01/2020 20:35

Whatever you do, design and make the foundations and ground floor walls …Whatever you do, design and make the foundations and ground floor walls capable of supporting a second floor. That way, as i and a few other people I know have done, if you can only do the ground floor now, when you come to do the second floor you wont have to rip the whole lot down. You can just remove the roof and build the second storey on top and then put roof back.But to answer the question*Rough plan yourself*Pre-app advice with council regarding permission. *Architect drawings *Full Planning Permission Application*Building Control Pre-App advice*Building control application *Builders quotes*Builder starts work*Probably 6-9 visits by various people to site to sign off bits for mortgage company (not yours but when you come to sell it who ever buys it will want to know that part of the house is mortgageable).*Building control visits. *Builder finishes*Snagging issues rectified. *Electrical certs/gas certs/building control certs etc all gathered*Divorce.


Best bit of that advice *Divorce
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