Fish - live ones - Biorb

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Posted 13th Sep
Daughter wants some fish for her birthday (wrapping them up will be fun)
Does anyone have a biorb tank please and if so would you recommend one?
We only want something small as she wants to keep them in her bedroom and I kind of like the look of the Biorbs but just don’t know how practical they are for cleaning etc
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deleted1410297
Learn the nitrogen cycle fully then think about owning some fish.
Small tank = small fish and not very many of them I am afraid there is a view that any tank below 60 litres is a waste of time. Its not my view but I at a time was interested in getting a tank.
Biorb tanks are fine, as they are so small, cleaning and water changes take literally minutes.
Just take one 10 litre bucket out each week and pour 10 litres fresh water back in clean the glass over and done in around 10 minutes. Once every 2-4 weeks clean the substrate on the bottom which takes an extra 10 minutes. Clean pumps etc every few months, that would be about 30 minutes total, overall a very easy low maintenance tank.
Dont forget as its really small you can only keep some small fish like neons or danios. You could probably get away with 2 male guppies for some colour and a small group of neons.
However the tanks are very expensive for what they are, i wouldn't buy one but thats just an opinion.
Also as mentioned above, you need to learn about the nitrogen cycle, you cant just buy a tank and fish on her birthday and throw them in, it takes the filter a month to be ready for fish.
If you put fish in during the nitrogen cycle they will be tortured and poisened and most likely die
deleted141029713/09/2019 14:03

Learn the nitrogen cycle fully then think about owning some fish.


Get a degree in marine biology, then think about keeping fish.
ask your local shop the maximum number of fish your biorb can take - not likely more than 1 or 2 small fish.
please change your water often, otherwise the fish are just living in their own waste...
Saj_120913/09/2019 15:32

ask your local shop the maximum number of fish your biorb can take - not …ask your local shop the maximum number of fish your biorb can take - not likely more than 1 or 2 small fish.please change your water often, otherwise the fish are just living in their own waste...


Depends on the shop. Staff at specialist aquatics shops generally know what they're talking about but staff at places like Pets at Home are often clueless when it comes to fish.
spoo13/09/2019 15:39

Depends on the shop. Staff at specialist aquatics shops generally know …Depends on the shop. Staff at specialist aquatics shops generally know what they're talking about but staff at places like Pets at Home are often clueless when it comes to fish.


yeh fair point

when i first typed this out it said "ask your local fish shop" and I was like thats not right

words escape me

just waiting for friday work to end...!
Here's a good link explaining cycling your tank and the nitrogen cycle:
fishkeepingadvice.com/the…le/

....and after you've read that, here's a link about seeding a tank, which is basically taking filter media from a mature established tank and adding it to the filter of a new tank. This is what I did when I used to keep tropical fish, far easier than fishless cycling and much better for fish than cycling with fish (both described in the first link).
thesprucepets.com/see…286
Edited by: "spoo" 13th Sep
Just realised I didn't answer the BiOrb question.

I'm not really a fan, the big problem I can see is cleaning them if you get algae growth (which you almost certainly will) removing it from the inside of the tank will be a major PITA. With flat sided tanks it's fairly straightforward using a magnetic scraper. I've also read in the past that perspex tanks like biorbs are more prone to scratching that glass tanks but I never owned one so can't say for sure. The one big advantage of perspex tanks is weight, glass tanks when empty are a lot heavier than they look.

Visually I've always thought cube shaped tanks look quite attractive as an alternative to the usual rectangular ones.
You can get cube tanks (Nano tanks) that have inbuilt filters. These are not much bigger than the biorb tanks but much more practical. Chose your fish well, get some Shrimp to clean the tank ( they are interesting to watch and quite colourful too, if you pick the right ones). Avoid snails in a small tank.
Accelerate the prep by going to a good aquatic shop and getting some R O water (reverse osmosis). Introduce shrimp first abs with just the shrimp in, overfeed the tank. This allows the shrimp to have something to forage for. Shrimp are hardier than fish. So help to prepare the tank.
Another fish to get is a loach, they are the 'vacuum cleaners' of the aquarium, and clear up lots of debris. Do some research and get one suitable for your tank. Then in a few weeks get a couple of fish.
Edited by: "Ringfinger" 13th Sep
As others have said, you need to cycle your tank before you put fish in... otherwise they will wake up to a birthday present of dead fish. You can do this with pure ammonia, but then you would need to buy a test kit... not sure how much you really want to go into the science of things.

If you are going for a Nano/BiOrb tank then I suggest only having a Betta in there alone with some shrimp / Assassin snails to help keep the tank clean. Introduce the shrimp/snails first and like above said over feed a bit to help cycle the tank.

Small tank = less fish.
dbizal13/09/2019 21:25

As others have said, you need to cycle your tank before you put fish in... …As others have said, you need to cycle your tank before you put fish in... otherwise they will wake up to a birthday present of dead fish. You can do this with pure ammonia, but then you would need to buy a test kit... not sure how much you really want to go into the science of things. If you are going for a Nano/BiOrb tank then I suggest only having a Betta in there alone with some shrimp / Assassin snails to help keep the tank clean. Introduce the shrimp/snails first and like above said over feed a bit to help cycle the tank. Small tank = less fish.


Personally if you go the nano system, consider marine and just having shrimp and a couple of corals. Once they are up and running they can be quite easy to maintain. As long as you have the discipline to regularly change the filtration media and water (25% a month). The fish are prettier and more varied as well - take a look. Small fish for small tanks
Edited by: "Ringfinger" 13th Sep
If you are keeping fish in a bedroom, don't forget you'll have the constant hum of the pump all night while you're trying to sleep.
The Vision aquarium 30 (Amazon) may be better than Biorb… 25L capacity
NB. All these "system" options seem to have light (possibly more an effect light than a plant grow light) and filter, but not heater.

For cold water, 1 or at most 2 fantails, the fancies being slower growing and slower moving have lower requirements than the old goldfish.

Going tropical with heating, maybe some neon tetras, or get one pair of guppies, add some plant and floating plant and wait
Don't bother to think of it long term, your daughter will get bored quickly and not be interested in looking after fish properly. Buy a little five pound tank from B&M and a few fish from pets at home, they won't last long.
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