Fitting an electric cooker

15
Found 15th May 2012
Im looking for some advice on fitting an electric cooker. I privately rent and wanted to know if i need to get an electrician to fit it or can my dad to do it?
thanks
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It should just be plug n work thing i guess.
Surely has to be wired to proper switch on wall , with correct cable ? Ask landlord to do it
My old cooker is still wired in with a grey cable, it just needs connecting to my new cooker im wondering if i really need an electrician to do that?
iRuman: electric cookers don't work off 13amp plugs they require a small amount of wiring.

The wiring is very very easy but sometimes your guarantee on the cooker is not classed as valid when you try to claim if you don't have prove that a electrician has installed it. We never bothered and installed said cooker ourselves and have never had a problem. I'm sure you could get a electrician to certify the wiring to validate your warranty if you really needed to claim.
As said above it is a very simple job for somebody who is competent with basic electrics. However if not it is a potentially extremely dangerous thing to do.

An electrician should be competent, but we do not know if your dad is.
He has fitted them himself before and electric plug sockets etc, i can not find anywhere it can tell me if i need it by law thats all. thanks for your help
It is really easy.


There is no need to get a qualified electrician unless he is the sort of person that gets one to fit a 13amp plug to a toaster
Edited by: "thesaint" 15th May 2012
not meant to touch electrics but everyone does, i would do it
Tracey6101

He has fitted them himself before and electric plug sockets etc, i can … He has fitted them himself before and electric plug sockets etc, i can not find anywhere it can tell me if i need it by law thats all. thanks for your help



no law in place,it really does depend on how handy your dad is as to whether he can do it.
If the Cooker is a plug in unit (wired to a standard 13Amp plug) then you do not require an electrician to fit it if the socket is already existing for you to plug it in to.

If the power or wattage is such that the oven requires it own dedicated feed then this has its own set of problems.

If the cooker is 40 Amps or below then you will require a 6mm cable to supply the cooker. If it is more than this you will require 10mm cable to supply it.

If the cable is existing you need to know the size of the cable and the size of the breaker feeding it to ensure it can power the new cooker, if not you will need an electrician to fit the new supply.

If the breaker is too small but the cable is capable of supply then you need an electrician to uprate the breaker as they will need to test to ensure the cable is up to standard to accommodate the extra Amps allowed by the new breaker on to the circuit.

All Circuits and Alterations in Kitchens and Bathrooms must now be on a RCD protected Circuit so if the wiring is not sufficient or existing in the first place and the Main board is not RCD this would be more cost as it will either need the whole board replacing, an RCBO fitting or a sub board installing to feed only the cooker.

If you know that the currently installed cables and breakers can accommodate your new cooker then you could wire it yourself but you are not supposed to and as such may invalidate any home insurance if it could be proved. The larger Ovens are supposed to be fitted by electricians hence why they don't come with cable attached.

All that said its up to you its all regulations that should be followed and conditions of insurance up until it all goes wrong and then thats when the LAW steps in and looks at the cause of any problem.

Hope this helps.


Edited by: "wowjaacc" 15th May 2012
I have a specially wired plug for my cooker. It has some sort of safety shutoff. Same thing with the shower.
you need to make sure your new oven is safe to run off the existing cabling. If it is the same wattage as the old cooker you are fine. If it is more you might run into problems. Old wiring is usually 6mm, new is 10mm and is a right PITA to work with.
iRuman

It should just be plug n work thing i guess.


oh dear - dont give electrical advice if you are this clueless!
Today, the installing of a new gas cooker must by law comply with safety standards and be undertaken by a Gas Safe registered engineer. Amateur installation of gas cookers poses a high risk to families, this is due to gas leaks often been the result of faulty or unsecured connections. You can find a local Gas Safe registered engineer by visiting the website or contacting them directly.

The rules surrounding the self installation of a new electric cooker are slightly more relaxed. They are more lenient when the cooker is simply being replaced into the same socket/spur. This can be done by a non-qualified person and is relatively simple to carry out and is comparable to the rewiring of a plug. Some knowledge of basic electrics is required.

When the cooker's location is being changed and requires the installation of a new circuit, a professional is required as this is complex re-wiring.

One of the main drawbacks to connecting an electric cooker yourself is the lack of any quality guarantee or product warranty. Should a fault occur the call out of a qualified electrician could lead to further expense and inconvenience.

From 2005, The Part P Building Regulations which cover any installation or maintenance work within the home recommends that professional advice is sought before carrying out any electrical work within the home. Be aware, if you carry out any work yourself which should have been carried out by a professional, then your home insurance could be deemed invalid.

diyhowto.co.uk/art…htm
csiman

Today, the installing of a new gas cooker must by law comply with safety … Today, the installing of a new gas cooker must by law comply with safety standards and be undertaken by a Gas Safe registered engineer.



Incorrect.
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