Four bay DAS recommendations

4
Posted 24th AugEdited by:"sancho1983"
Hello, looking for a four bay DAS which supports RAID5 and supports hard drives which won't cost me a fortune.

I'm looking for three 6TB drives too - I want to put a fourth one in to use simply for time machine backups.

Any suggestions?
Thanks!

EDIT - DAS, not NAS due to the online backup software I use
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As much as I like RAID 5 (and still use it on a couple of my machines) RAID 5 isn't really recommended on disks that large as the rebuild success rate is so low on disks larger than 1tb.
Uridium25/08/2020 16:57

As much as I like RAID 5 (and still use it on a couple of my machines) …As much as I like RAID 5 (and still use it on a couple of my machines) RAID 5 isn't really recommended on disks that large as the rebuild success rate is so low on disks larger than 1tb.


That’s interesting, I didn’t know that.

Do you have any suggestions then?
I am also looking at a redundancy solution for 3or4 14tb drives.

I was considering a cheap DAS initially but move to either a decent NAS or build a unraid/true nas server using an intel with integrated gfx.
Uridium25/08/2020 16:57

As much as I like RAID 5 (and still use it on a couple of my machines) …As much as I like RAID 5 (and still use it on a couple of my machines) RAID 5 isn't really recommended on disks that large as the rebuild success rate is so low on disks larger than 1tb.


Oh really? What would you suggest instead?
sancho198328/08/2020 08:29

Oh really? What would you suggest instead?


With redundancy either Raid 10 or Raid 6, both are going to cost extra in storage/capacity though. Or you just take the risk with RAID5. In the event of a failure you might be lucky, you might not if the disks are very large XD. Worst case you fall back to a backup copy of the data.

Without redundancy and as RAID is ONLY redundancy and NOT a backup substitute (you should really be backing the data up in addition to running a RAID array) to be honest you are as well to just run the disks in JBOD with a decent backup. then if/when you lose a disk its just a matter of restoring the lost data from a backup. Having a good backup regime is vital for JBOD though, regular backups with decent error checking.

I do run JBOD on one server (3Tb of disk), I have a weekly backup to an external drive using a robocopy script and a realtime sync of any data I REALLY wouldn't want to lose to a cloud provider using a nice little tool called Syncovery.

I do run one large 12Tb Array in RAID 5 myself so potentially I might not recover from a disk failure, but the main thing is I'm aware of the risk.... I have a good backup regime in place though so should it come to it and I lose a disk and cannot recover the array I can restore from backup. Its also running on a server with a dedicated hardware array controller.

Lots of people still use RAID5 and its still a good option for many. It underpins millions of of servers worldwide still, its just important to be aware that it has its limitations now that disks are bigger.

Quoting a saying I was told a long time ago when I first started working in IT
"If your data doesn't exist in at least 3 different places it might as well not exist at all."
Edited by: "Uridium" 28th Aug
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