From 1 January 2011, Sainsbury's own label range of baby feeding accessories will be 100% BPA (Bisphenol A)-free. starting from 79p @ sainsburys

8 replies
Found 4th Jan 2011
The BPA-free product range extends from Sainsbury's Basics up to the decorative Little Ones items, with prices starting from £0.79.
From 1 January 2011, Sainsbury's own label range of baby feeding accessories will be 100% BPA (Bisphenol A)-free. The range is suitable for babies and toddlers and includes plates, bowls, cutlery, bottles, teats, bibs, soothers and cups.

The BPA-free products, which include an exciting new range of glow in the dark cups, pink polka dot print matching accessories and adorable new designs, are fun for kids, whilst the easy grip bottles, easy fasten bibs and non-spill cups will be a hit with parents too.

Although BPA is not banned in the UK, Sainsbury's is committed to offering parents piece of mind when selecting feeding products. "There is a considerable amount of confusion about BPA and its' possible health risks" said Jen Edwards, Product Technical Manager at Sainsbury's. "We know that their children's health is of paramount importance to the parents that shop in our stores so we wanted to come up with a range of practical affordable baby products that come with the added bonus of peace of mind."

Bisphenol A (BPA) is a well investigated chemical substance used to make clear plastic hard (e.g. within feeding bottles) that has been approved as safe for use in food and drink containers by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) and the UK Food Standards Agency. However BPA content has been banned from feeding bottles in Canada, France and some USA states.

8 Comments

not really a deal...

but excellent news thanks x

Original Poster

nicster08

not really a deal...



is if you have young children darling

About time, should be standard for all food containers - not just at Sainsbury's.

Plastics that contain BPA have the recycle triangle with a number 7 inside it.
upload.wikimedia.org/wik…svg

en.wikipedia.org/wik…l_A

"In general, plastics that are marked with recycle codes 1, 2, 4, 5, and … "In general, plastics that are marked with recycle codes 1, 2, 4, 5, and 6 are very unlikely to contain BPA. Some, but not all, plastics that are marked with recycle codes 3 or 7 may be made with BPA." [25]There are seven classes of plastics used in packaging applications. Type 7 is the catch-all "other" class, and some type 7 plastics, such as polycarbonate (sometimes identified with the letters "PC" near the recycling symbol) and epoxy resins, are made from bisphenol A monomer.[5][26]Type 3 (PVC) can also contain bisphenol A as an antioxidant in plasticizers.[5] This is particularly true for "flexible PVC", but not true for PVC pipes.



The BPA-free products, which include an exciting new range of glow in the … The BPA-free products, which include an exciting new range of glow in the dark cups...



So they take out the BPA and replace it with a nice dose of Strontium Aluminate and Zinc Sulphide? oO:p

Although BPA is not banned in the UK, Sainsbury's is committed to … Although BPA is not banned in the UK, Sainsbury's is committed to offering parents piece of mind when selecting feeding products.



If they were that concerned about it, they would have done it years ago. No strict scientific proof between this chemical and a link to ill-health anyway.

moob

No strict scientific proof between this chemical and a link to … No strict scientific proof between this chemical and a link to ill-health anyway.



en.wikipedia.org/wik…l_A

Enough to warrant concern.... No?

moob

No strict scientific proof between this chemical and a link to … No strict scientific proof between this chemical and a link to ill-health anyway.

Early development appears to be the period of greatest sensitivity to its … Early development appears to be the period of greatest sensitivity to its effects.[32] Regulatory bodies have determined safety levels for humans, but those safety levels are currently being questioned or under review as a result of new scientific studies



Not seriously:



The thing about scientific research when it's done incorrectly - i.e. you go looking for something, you're likely to find it - is that you get skewed results. This doesn't mean fact. Once someone caries out double-blind epidemiological research that proves it without doubt, I would be concerned.

There are many kids out there who've grown up using bottles containing BPA that are unaffected. The majority on the planet for a start.
Post a comment
Avatar
@
    Text
    Top Discussions
    1. The Brexit Good News Thread1016
    2. word association Game74244857
    3. Missing the old HUKD for sale area.55
    4. 5 Letter Scrabble Game52322810

    See more discussions