Good tyres for mtb used on roads?Any recommendations?

10
Posted 20th Jun
Hi folks,I have an mtb with 26" wheels and I'm looking for tyres that run quickly on tarmac,I only use my bike on the roads,I have a tight budget so I won't be buying a new bike,so if anyone knows of good tyres with low rolling resistance that will be nippy on tarmac and where I may be able to find them that would be great.
I have no idea what is the best width,I'm 12.5 stone
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Schwalbe Marathon Plus. Very puncture resistant. Tough. Not cheap though. But you get what you pay for. I've used these for years. merlincycles.com/sch…tml
StudentGrant20/06/2020 22:44

Schwalbe Marathon Plus. Very puncture resistant. Tough. Not cheap though. …Schwalbe Marathon Plus. Very puncture resistant. Tough. Not cheap though. But you get what you pay for. I've used these for years. https://www.merlincycles.com/schwalbe-marathon-plus-smartguard-rigid-road-tyre-26-51315.html



Hi thanks,which size do you think are the best/quickest?,I see them in a 1.35" 1.5" and 1.75" on that site
Edited by: "Maxim7750" 20th Jun
Smaller size means smaller road contact patch, which will in turn mean less resistance and higher speed.
But make sure your rims can take the size before you buy.
And ensure that you are happy to ride them, there can be a big difference in feel and handling when you change tyre width.
Personally I hate skinny tires of any sort, and can tell the difference between 1.75 and 2.1 on bikes - but then I’m not aiming for speed as I’m on trails most of the time nowadays
Kbramman21/06/2020 00:34

Smaller size means smaller road contact patch, which will in turn mean …Smaller size means smaller road contact patch, which will in turn mean less resistance and higher speed. But make sure your rims can take the size before you buy. And ensure that you are happy to ride them, there can be a big difference in feel and handling when you change tyre width. Personally I hate skinny tires of any sort, and can tell the difference between 1.75 and 2.1 on bikes - but then I’m not aiming for speed as I’m on trails most of the time nowadays



Ok thanks,I got some Schwalbe tyres a while ago called Big Bens and I think they might be 2.1" they are chunky The tread looked quite smooth when I looked at them online before buying and they are a comfortable ride but they seem so slow on the road,I might go for a 1.75" of the marathon plus this time
Schwalbe Cx Comp are very decent budget tyres that I have used for 5 years and seem quick in tarmac yet can still go off road to some extent
chocci21/06/2020 08:25

Schwalbe Cx Comp are very decent budget tyres that I have used for 5 years …Schwalbe Cx Comp are very decent budget tyres that I have used for 5 years and seem quick in tarmac yet can still go off road to some extent



Cheers,I shall have a look at them
Kbramman21/06/2020 00:34

Smaller size means smaller road contact patch, which will in turn mean …Smaller size means smaller road contact patch, which will in turn mean less resistance and higher speed. But make sure your rims can take the size before you buy. And ensure that you are happy to ride them, there can be a big difference in feel and handling when you change tyre width. Personally I hate skinny tires of any sort, and can tell the difference between 1.75 and 2.1 on bikes - but then I’m not aiming for speed as I’m on trails most of the time nowadays



Ok thanks,yes I think the skinny ones could be uncomfortable,I will let you know how I get on
Kbramman21/06/2020 00:34

Smaller size means smaller road contact patch, which will in turn mean …Smaller size means smaller road contact patch, which will in turn mean less resistance and higher speed.


It's pressure that determines the size of the contact patch, width just determines the shape so thinner tyres aren't inherently any less draggy.

Thinner tyres are usually rated for higher pressures which is where the perception comes from, but not always and there are tyre ranges where 35mm, 40mm and 47mm tyres are all rated for the same pressure.

There are other big factors involved in rolling resistance such as how supple the tyre is. The more it can deform around lumps and bumps the less energy is lost (because the alternative is the whole bike and rider being lifted slightly). So big thick puncture belts slow you down (but slow is better than stopped).

Maxim775021/06/2020 00:44

The tread looked quite smooth when I looked at them online before buying …The tread looked quite smooth when I looked at them online before buying and they are a comfortable ride but they seem so slow on the road,I might go for a 1.75" of the marathon plus this time


Well wider tyres have more air in them so they transmit less vibration and there's less sense of speed even when they're just as fast.

You're probably better off going for the Marathon Supreme or Marathon Racer in those ranges if you want fast, although you will give up a bit of puncture resistance next to the Plus.
I bought these and have been really pleased with them, pump them up so they are solid.

Check the price on camelcamel though as i paid £15 back in 2018!

amazon.co.uk/dp/…6YF
bluetba21/06/2020 23:29

I bought these and have been really pleased with them, pump them up so …I bought these and have been really pleased with them, pump them up so they are solid.Check the price on camelcamel though as i paid £15 back in 2018!https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B013KCTZ2I/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_Y597Eb9VCF6YF



Cheers they look good,They remind me of the old style Schwalbe city jet from years ago before it got replaced by the newer much inferior and differently styled city jet
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