hammerite hammered paint questions

9
Found 23rd May 2017
Ello, have some perhaps silly questions about about hammerite paint

Anyway, the first question is regarding the outer texture of the paint itself
Its supposed to recreate the look of a 'hammered' finish but is that done fully internally or on the surface as well?

as far as i can see from googling the look is achieved with a silicone oil additive which achieves some separation but is that fully internal with a smooth outer like regular paint or does it dry rough?

if it dries textured internally can it be sanded without affecting the internal texturing?

also i see its not coatable by certain things due to the silicone - what about either clearcoat sprays or car waxes?

cheers

9 Comments

Sounds like you need Smoothrite.
Edited by: "rhinopaul" 23rd May 2017

Original Poster

rhinopaul

Sounds like you need Smoothrite.


smooth finish hammerite? no - i want the texture look which is why i specifically asked about the hammered finish

"Hammered" is a surface effect caused, as you say, by the addition of the silicone. (Smoothrite is the same paint minus the silicone).

If you really need to coat it with something I'd give it a couple of weeks to cure for you to have the best chance of something adhering - I guess you would be ok with a wax but less successful with a sprayed on aerosol coating.

The feel of the surface will be slightly textured - but not rough to the touch, more "dimpled".

Original Poster

Van1973

"Hammered" is a surface effect caused, as you say, by the addition of the … "Hammered" is a surface effect caused, as you say, by the addition of the silicone. (Smoothrite is the same paint minus the silicone).If you really need to coat it with something I'd give it a couple of weeks to cure for you to have the best chance of something adhering - I guess you would be ok with a wax but less successful with a sprayed on aerosol coating.The feel of the surface will be slightly textured - but not rough to the touch, more "dimpled".


thanks, if its a surface roughnes... if i sand it down will that make it just look the same as smooth or is the texture all the way through?

If you sand it from what I remember it will go smooth ish but is more wrinkled it's not all the way through as it's just not thick enough. It also sands lighter meaning black becomes grey. It's been a while since I used it though. Back in the 80s as a 17 year old painted our banger with it so could back then paint it on anything only used it on a metal gate more recently.

i used black hammerite hammered paint to paint some metal fence a few years back and i can't remember it looking that much different to ordinary gloss paint. i chose it because it said it was tough and durable for outdoor use.

it may be that i do not have enough of a perception of the difference in texture between paints in general but i certainly did not notice any dramatic difference in look when it was used for metal.

brilly

thanks, if its a surface roughnes... if i sand it down will that make it … thanks, if its a surface roughnes... if i sand it down will that make it just look the same as smooth or is the texture all the way through?


I don't really know - it's not a paint that's "designed" to be sanded down.

eslick

If you sand it from what I remember it will go smooth ish but is more … If you sand it from what I remember it will go smooth ish but is more wrinkled it's not all the way through as it's just not thick enough. It also sands lighter meaning black becomes grey. It's been a while since I used it though. Back in the 80s as a 17 year old painted our banger with it so could back then paint it on anything only used it on a metal gate more recently.



The paint has been reformulated many times since the 80's - now made in Poland rather than Prudhoe in Northumberland. Current formulation appears not to be as viscous as I remember back in the late 70's. Likewise, I used to slap black Hammerite onto lower sections of any colour car we had - used to look quite decent for a few weeks before the rust came through again!

Hammerite actually has no corosion resistant properties - it is just formulated on a very adhesive resin.

Original Poster

hmmm ok thanks folks, maybe back to the drawing board X)
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