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Has anyone used Cortaflex Capsules for osteoarthritis relief ? Any other suggestions ?

21
Found 18th Dec 2013
As above, I have been diagnosed with early stage osteoarthritis.
Currently taking Diclofenac as prescribed by the doctor but would like to get off that if possible. To do that I need to find an alternative that will help my joints, especially the knees.
Various people have recommended Cortaflex, anyone on here tried this ? and does it help at all ?
Or any other alternatives ? Thanks.

21 Comments

With the diclofenac did the doctor prescribe an antacid at all ? ie lansoprazole, I was on them for 23 years for a spinal injury they can do terrible damage to the stomach lining if not taken with something like the lansoprazole,

Original Poster

Yes, sorry, should have mentioned that I'd been given 20mg Omeprazole to take once a dayas what the Doc called a supporting drug.
Taking the Diclofenac as 50mg 3 times a day.
I was under the impression that the doctors didn't like prescribing these long term, but 23 years is definitely a long time, did you have any problems with them ?

i know nothing about cortaflex, just wanted to say hope you feel better soon x

Try this - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/T'ai_chi_ch'uan

Health benefits

Before t'ai chi ch'uan's introduction to Western students, the health benefits of t'ai chi ch'uan were largely explained through the lens of traditional Chinese medicine, which is based on a view of the body and healing mechanisms not always studied or supported by modern science. Today, t'ai chi ch'uan is in the process of being subjected to rigorous scientific studies in the West.[25] Now that the majority of health studies have displayed a tangible benefit in some areas to the practice of t'ai chi ch'uan, health professionals have called for more in-depth studies to determine mitigating factors such as the most beneficial style, suggested duration of practice to show the best results, and whether t'ai chi ch'uan is as effective as other forms of exercise.[25]
Chronic conditions[edit]

Researchers have found that intensive t'ai chi ch'uan practice shows some favorable effects on the promotion of balance control, flexibility, cardiovascular fitness, and has shown to reduce the risk of falls in both healthy elderly patients,[26][27] and those recovering from chronic stroke,[28] heart failure, high blood pressure, heart attacks, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's, Alzheimer's and fibromyalgia.[29][30] T'ai chi ch'uan's gentle, low impact movements burn more calories than surfing and nearly as many as downhill skiing.[31]

T'ai chi ch'uan, along with yoga, has reduced levels of LDLs 20–26 milligrams when practiced for 12–14 weeks.[32] A thorough review of most of these studies showed limitations or biases that made it difficult to draw firm conclusions on the benefits of t'ai chi ch'uan.[25] A later study led by the same researchers conducting the review, found that t'ai chi ch'uan (compared to regular stretching) showed the ability to greatly reduce pain and improve overall physical and mental health in people over 60 with severe osteoarthritis of the knee.[33] In addition, a pilot study, which has not been published in a peer-reviewed medical journal, has found preliminary evidence that t'ai chi ch'uan and related qigong may reduce the severity of diabetes.[34] In a randomized trial of 66 patients with fibromyalgia, the t'ai chi intervention group did significantly better in terms of pain, fatigue, sleeplessness and depression than a comparable group given stretching exercises and wellness education.[30]

A recent study evaluated the effects of two types of behavioral intervention, t'ai chi ch'uan and health education, on healthy adults, who, after 16 weeks of the intervention, were vaccinated with VARIVAX, a live attenuated Oka/Merck Varicella zoster virus vaccine. The t'ai chi ch'uan group showed higher and more significant levels of cell-mediated immunity to varicella zoster virus than the control group that received only health education. It appears that t'ai chi ch'uan augments resting levels of varicella zoster virus-specific cell-mediated immunity and boosts the efficacy of the varicella vaccine. T'ai chi ch'uan alone does not lessen the effects or probability of a shingles attack, but it does improve the effects of the varicella zoster virus vaccine.[35]
Stress and mental health[edit]

A systematic review and meta-analysis, funded in part by the U.S. government, of the current (as of 2010) studies on the effects of practicing t'ai chi ch'uan found that,

"Twenty-one of 33 randomized and nonrandomized trials reported that 1 hour to 1 year of regular t'ai chi significantly increased psychological well-being including reduction of stress, anxiety, and depression, and enhanced mood in community-dwelling healthy participants and in patients with chronic conditions. Seven observational studies with relatively large sample sizes reinforced the beneficial association between t'ai chi practice and psychological health."[36]

There have also been indications that t'ai chi ch'uan might have some effect on noradrenaline and cortisol production with an effect on mood and heart rate. However, the effect may be no different than those derived from other types of physical exercise.[37] In one study, t'ai chi ch'uan has also been shown to reduce the symptoms of Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in 13 adolescents. The improvement in symptoms seem to persist after the t'ai chi ch'uan sessions were terminated.[38]

In June, 2007 the United States National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine published an independent, peer-reviewed, meta-analysis of the state of meditation research, conducted by researchers at the University of Alberta Evidence-based Practice Center. The report reviewed 813 studies (88 involving t'ai chi ch'uan) of five broad categories of meditation: mantra meditation, mindfulness meditation, yoga, t'ai chi ch'uan, and qigong. The report concluded that "the therapeutic effects of meditation practices cannot be established based on the current literature" due to the fact that "scientific research on meditation practices does not appear to have a common theoretical perspective and is characterized by poor methodological quality."
Edited by: "3spartan" 18th Dec 2013

Give us a break ffs

chondroitin is good you usually find it with glucosamine, most people take them as a supplement, you may still need to take some kind of anti inflammatory with them, I wouldn't have thought diclofenac although ibruprofen cause stomach upsets too and that is what is usually prescribed.

Yes I agree with onepinkbit I get mine in the codliveroil capsules. I also use devils claw which is a natural anti inflammatory. I think it is an individual thing, works for some people.

Not sure what this contains but it has been shown that Glucosamine provides no benefit, in medical trials done.
That said, I know lots of people who swear by it.

I think money would be better spent with a Physio. Cannot be cured but specific gentle exercises can help to reduce pain and stiffness but only if done regularly.

I hope you get some relief. Im in constant pain with a list of conditions and my husband has osteoatheritis and also has alot of pain.
Sorry I cant help with your question, just wanted to wish you all the very best xxx

yorkypikey

Yes, sorry, should have mentioned that I'd been given 20mg Omeprazole to … Yes, sorry, should have mentioned that I'd been given 20mg Omeprazole to take once a dayas what the Doc called a supporting drug.Taking the Diclofenac as 50mg 3 times a day.I was under the impression that the doctors didn't like prescribing these long term, but 23 years is definitely a long time, did you have any problems with them ?



No problems I was on the 75sr, the only reason they took me off was it conflicted with another medication I needed to be on, have you looked at Glucosamine and Chondroitin as an alternative it was recommended for one of my horses by a vet, but in the human tablet form as far cheaper than vet form, it worked so well my mum who had rheumatoid arthritis in her spine and hands started using it and it helped massively

traceym

No problems I was on the 75sr, the only reason they took me off was it … No problems I was on the 75sr, the only reason they took me off was it conflicted with another medication I needed to be on, have you looked at Glucosamine and Chondroitin as an alternative it was recommended for one of my horses by a vet, but in the human tablet form as far cheaper than vet form, it worked so well my mum who had rheumatoid arthritis in her spine and hands started using it and it helped massively



Where is the best place to buy them from? X

Original Poster

hocka

Where is the best place to buy them from? X



Best I can find is for cortaflex is chemistdirect.co.uk £23.99 for 60 x 200mg or £22.99 for 30 x 400mg....plus £3.95 p&p unless you spend over £40.
woodshealth.com have a high strength Glucosamine and Chondroitin combination at £11.99 for 360 tablets.

Original Poster

A big thanks to all who have replied to my question, especially those that just wanted to wish me well for the future.
I have been taking Glucosamine and Codliver oil capsules for the last 11 months, and Diclofenac since June.
I've always had achy joints but was ok with occasional Ibuprofen, inflammation and stiffness flared up very suddenly in February after a weekend at Centre Parcs with the 4 nephews, could hardly get out of bed / go up and down stairs etc.
Xrays dont show any real joint wear so Rheumatologist referred me to Physiotherapist, been doing various joint stretching exercises which appear to be slowly helping me.
Everybody you talk to recommends different things, Ground flax seeds, Cod liver oil, Cortaflex etc
Might have a change to a Glucosamine and Chondroitin combination tablet and Cortaflex when my current supply runs out.
Dont have real pain at the moment, just stiffness in knee joints which feel slightly swollen. Thumbs and shoulders which were effected initially seem to have got back to normal.
Thanks again to all for your input.
Edited by: "yorkypikey" 18th Dec 2013

yorkypikey

Best I can find is for cortaflex is chemistdirect.co.uk £23.99 for 60 x … Best I can find is for cortaflex is chemistdirect.co.uk £23.99 for 60 x 200mg or £22.99 for 30 x 400mg....plus £3.95 p&p unless you spend over £40.woodshealth.com have a high strength Glucosamine and Chondroitin combination at £11.99 for 360 tablets.



Thank you very much, I will look into these for my husband xxx

yorkypikey

Best I can find is for cortaflex is chemistdirect.co.uk £23.99 for 60 x … Best I can find is for cortaflex is chemistdirect.co.uk £23.99 for 60 x 200mg or £22.99 for 30 x 400mg....plus £3.95 p&p unless you spend over £40.woodshealth.com have a high strength Glucosamine and Chondroitin combination at £11.99 for 360 tablets.



Thank you very much, I will look into these for my husband xxx

am I correct thinking that its either or? (cortaflex or glucosamine/chondroitin) are they the same thing?

Original Poster

hocka

am I correct thinking that its either or? (cortaflex or … am I correct thinking that its either or? (cortaflex or glucosamine/chondroitin) are they the same thing?


They are both different supplementsbut appear to do a similar job depending on who you speak to and which reports you read.
Cortaflex is more expensive but keeps getting recommended to me by people who have anything to do with horses or dogs, if those with thouroughbred horses use it then in must be worth a try.

Thanks for that, I will talk to my husband about these. Although nothing can repair the crumbling joints apart from surgery, hopefully these will help with the pain. Do you know if they prevent the problems worsening?

Original Poster

hocka

Thanks for that, I will talk to my husband about these. Although nothing … Thanks for that, I will talk to my husband about these. Although nothing can repair the crumbling joints apart from surgery, hopefully these will help with the pain. Do you know if they prevent the problems worsening?



I'm not a medical expert but have just been reading some of the feedback on the links I've copied below and its enough to convince me to give them a go.

http://www.chemistdirect.co.uk/cortaflex-capsules---hyaluronic-acid-high-strength-human_1_4933.html#4933
woodshealth.com/rev…=50

yorkypikey

I'm not a medical expert but have just been reading some of the feedback … I'm not a medical expert but have just been reading some of the feedback on the links I've copied below and its enough to convince me to give them a go.http://www.chemistdirect.co.uk/cortaflex-capsules---hyaluronic-acid-high-strength-human_1_4933.html#4933http://www.woodshealth.com/review/product/list/id/212/?limit=50



Thank you very much! xx

yorkypikey

A big thanks to all who have replied to my question, especially those … A big thanks to all who have replied to my question, especially those that just wanted to wish me well for the future.I have been taking Glucosamine and Codliver oil capsules for the last 11 months, and Diclofenac since June.I've always had achy joints but was ok with occasional Ibuprofen, inflammation and stiffness flared up very suddenly in February after a weekend at Centre Parcs with the 4 nephews, could hardly get out of bed / go up and down stairs etc. Xrays dont show any real joint wear so Rheumatologist referred me to Physiotherapist, been doing various joint stretching exercises which appear to be slowly helping me.Everybody you talk to recommends different things, Ground flax seeds, Cod liver oil, Cortaflex etc Might have a change to a Glucosamine and Chondroitin combination tablet and Cortaflex when my current supply runs out.Dont have real pain at the moment, just stiffness in knee joints which feel slightly swollen. Thumbs and shoulders which were effected initially seem to have got back to normal.Thanks again to all for your input.



Glad the Physio is having some results. They just have to become a daily routine, so you don't even notice you are doing them after a while. Keeping the joints supple is the most important aim of treatment. Like I said, medical research has shown this medication has no effect and definitely cannot prevent further problems.

Do you need to take Diclofenac if you are no longer in pain ? You can just keep them for when you have a flare up
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