"have you had any accidents" in insurance quote - protected NCD

25
Found 16th Jan
if one is looking for new insurance quote on a car, what should be answered in
"have you had any accidents in last 3 years" if there was accident but it was protected with NCD?
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NCD is just a discount you get for having no claims. Even if it is protected, it won't stop your premium increasing, it will just retain the percentage discount you get on your (now larger) premium.
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You still have to tell them 😏
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deleted800342
If you don't tell them, they share records and will most likely find out, which could affect future policies / prices
So just tell them
Eh? You already answered the question yourself. Why do you need to ask it again?
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deeky11 m ago

Eh? You already answered the question yourself. Why do you need to ask it …Eh? You already answered the question yourself. Why do you need to ask it again?


Welcome to HUKD Deek, common sense is not required
NCD is just a discount you get for having no claims. Even if it is protected, it won't stop your premium increasing, it will just retain the percentage discount you get on your (now larger) premium.
The question is if you have had any accidents and so you should answer just that.

even if you drive for work and had an accident under your companies insurance, it still counts.

if you are dishonest and don't disclose when asked, your insurance could become invalid
Op doesn’t realise ncd stands for no claims discount not no accident discount :
Protecting NCD is pointless as they'll put your premium up anyway.
NCD gives you a percentage discount on your basic premium so it is normally worth protecting it for a tiny cost.

For example, if your insurance normally costs £500 a year with your 70% NCD discount this would have an actual cost of something like £1650, so you're getting £1150 off. Lets say you have an accident so the cost of the insurance now goes up to £2000, with your protected NCD you now pay £600 as you're only getting a % discount not a 'special price'.

I wouldn't like to go from £500 to £2000 because I lost all my NCD
And don't forget, that means any accident even if 100% obvious/proved other driver fault..... you need to say yes to the question.
Off topic but I wonder why on the few quotes I have had on gocompare it is a lot dearer on the same insurer to go with tpft rather than fully comp...... seems strange.
Hallsie1 h, 3 m ago

NCD gives you a percentage discount on your basic premium so it is …NCD gives you a percentage discount on your basic premium so it is normally worth protecting it for a tiny cost.For example, if your insurance normally costs £500 a year with your 70% NCD discount this would have an actual cost of something like £1650, so you're getting £1150 off. Lets say you have an accident so the cost of the insurance now goes up to £2000, with your protected NCD you now pay £600 as you're only getting a % discount not a 'special price'.I wouldn't like to go from £500 to £2000 because I lost all my NCD


You only usually lose 2 years of your no claims if you're liable. The insurance companies will usually increase your premium even though you have protected your no claims. It may be slightly beneficial protecting them if you've got less than 2 years no claims but the cost of your premium will rise. No claims protection is a big scam to extract extra money.
.MUFC.1 h, 2 m ago

You only usually lose 2 years of your no claims if you're liable. The …You only usually lose 2 years of your no claims if you're liable. The insurance companies will usually increase your premium even though you have protected your no claims. It may be slightly beneficial protecting them if you've got less than 2 years no claims but the cost of your premium will rise. No claims protection is a big scam to extract extra money.


You can only protect a minimum 4 years NCD.

I usually take this option - I guess it costs me approx £10-20/year. This is the ONLY "add on" I take - don't bother with Legal Protection or any other offered service as I have always thought this is worth it as a small cost to avoid a potential larger premium rise (as per Hallsie).

I've always thought that should I have an accident then I would still be able get quotes from other insurers using my 'protected' NCD - so not tied too the previous insurer - declaring any accidents/claims of course.
Van197332 m ago

You can only protect a minimum 4 years NCD.I usually take this option - I …You can only protect a minimum 4 years NCD.I usually take this option - I guess it costs me approx £10-20/year. This is the ONLY "add on" I take - don't bother with Legal Protection or any other offered service as I have always thought this is worth it as a small cost to avoid a potential larger premium rise (as per Hallsie). I've always thought that should I have an accident then I would still be able get quotes from other insurers using my 'protected' NCD - so not tied too the previous insurer - declaring any accidents/claims of course.


I really don't think any future insurer would care if you've paid your present insurer any extra, I think they would charge you the same regardless.
shadey1225 m ago

I really don't think any future insurer would care if you've paid your …I really don't think any future insurer would care if you've paid your present insurer any extra, I think they would charge you the same regardless.


Although they won't care I think are still likely to offer me a better price as it depends on what information they see on the quote application.

Let's say I had max no claims of 9 years and have an accident. If I had a protected policy I would still be able to state 9 years NCD at renewal - if I had not protected the NCD depending upon which insurer I was with I may be able to only claim 3 years NCD going forward!! moneysupermarket.com/car…rk/

My future insurer will not care that I have paid an extra premium - but my existing insurer has earlier accepted my 'bribe' and is required to give me proof of my protected entitlement!


Reading the moneysupermarket article suggests understanding how the NCD is managed by a particular insurer is a criteria that should be considered when selecting the insurer to go with!
Ok, I had to log in just to give my opinion as unfortunately I worked with insurance.

If your accident was claimed on your insurance and / or affected other driver(s). You must tell them to cover your back.

The only situation that you don't need to tell them is if you bumped your car in your own garage and repaired yourself or even could not be bothered by the damage, or anything that did not get officially recorded.

Once you tell them the price goes up and will stay up for a while.
Original Poster
gcmarcal4 h, 30 m ago

Once you tell them the price goes up and will stay up for a while.




1. Does it mean if I report accident, but later find out that cost of repairing it myself will be lower [excess + premium rise] and call insurer I don't want to claim any more - premium will rise anyway? This is what I'm considering....

Considering this... is there a risk of not calling insurance company with minor road accident [example: only a scratch that can be buffed - for both parties/cars]?


Thanks for input everyone.


Van19734 h, 42 m ago

Reading the moneysupermarket article suggests understanding how the NCD is …Reading the moneysupermarket article suggests understanding how the NCD is managed by a particular insurer is a criteria that should be considered when selecting the insurer to go with!


interesting
Edited by: "veni_vidi_emere" 17th Jan
Van19734 h, 59 m ago

You can only protect a minimum 4 years NCD.I usually take this option - I …You can only protect a minimum 4 years NCD.I usually take this option - I guess it costs me approx £10-20/year. This is the ONLY "add on" I take - don't bother with Legal Protection or any other offered service as I have always thought this is worth it as a small cost to avoid a potential larger premium rise (as per Hallsie). I've always thought that should I have an accident then I would still be able get quotes from other insurers using my 'protected' NCD - so not tied too the previous insurer - declaring any accidents/claims of course.


You could, that is a way around it, the fact you declare your accident will account for most of the increase. Insurance companies often count on loyalty a bit like the utility companies do. You have to be savvy, which it seems you are ;). The most maximum discount of no claims is around 7 years but you can earn upto 9. So if you ever get to 9 years you're not effected much baring the normal premium rise for having an accident. The first 2-3 years of no claims offers the most discount. After that the discount is minimal. Probably why the minimum for protected no claims is 4 years ;).
veni_vidi_emere13 h, 20 m ago

1. Does it mean if I report accident, but later find out that cost of …1. Does it mean if I report accident, but later find out that cost of repairing it myself will be lower [excess + premium rise] and call insurer I don't want to claim any more - premium will rise anyway? This is what I'm considering....Considering this... is there a risk of not calling insurance company with minor road accident [example: only a scratch that can be buffed - for both parties/cars]?Thanks for input everyone.interesting


If you call your insurance even to ask if the repair would be worth the excess, they could use that information against you and raise your premiums. All calls are recorded. Insurance companies are scum!
.MUFC.12 h, 55 m ago

You could, that is a way around it, the fact you declare your accident …You could, that is a way around it, the fact you declare your accident will account for most of the increase. Insurance companies often count on loyalty a bit like the utility companies do. You have to be savvy, which it seems you are ;). The most maximum discount of no claims is around 7 years but you can earn upto 9. So if you ever get to 9 years you're not effected much baring the normal premium rise for having an accident. The first 2-3 years of no claims offers the most discount. After that the discount is minimal. Probably why the minimum for protected no claims is 4 years ;).


There are no standards for NCB. you could have 10 years and then you move to another insurance where they just accept 5 years... Then you lose 5 years if you change on the next year ( or 4 if you want to be pedantic).

By experience I would say that when you reach 5 years NCB you get the highest discount. Anything after that is almost insignificant. IF your premium do get lower it would be because of other factors like age, type of work, car model or where you live.
Edited by: "gcmarcal" 18th Jan
gcmarcal9 m ago

There are no standards for NCB. you could have 10 years and then you move …There are no standards for NCB. you could have 10 years and then you move to another insurance where they just accept 5 years... Then you lose 5 years if you change on the next year ( or 4 if you want to be pedantic).By experience I would say that when you reach 5 years NCB you get the highest discount. Anything after that is almost insignificant. IF your premium do get lower it would be because of other factors like age, type of work, car model or where you live.


My 9 years no claims continued when changing to different insurance companies, I'd actually have 11 years if it'd go beyond that but that's the limit for most. My insurance company only offer discount for 7 years I believe so you don't lose them in every case. It's something I will bare in mind though in future because you're quite right, They don't have set standards so could vary.

I kept my 9 years no claims when switching from Octagon > Hastings for the record ;).
.MUFC.13 m ago

My 9 years no claims continued when changing to different insurance …My 9 years no claims continued when changing to different insurance companies, I'd actually have 11 years if it'd go beyond that but that's the limit for most. My insurance company only offer discount for 7 years I believe so you don't lose them in every case. It's something I will bare in mind though in future because you're quite right, They don't have set standards so could vary. I kept my 9 years no claims when switching from Octagon > Hastings for the record ;).


As I said, there is no common ground. I believe that CO-OP was the one that just accepted 5 years. If you had 10 years and moved to them and asked for a NCB proof on the following year. they would provide you with a 5 years proof.

I can't say that is still like that as I left insurance in 2016.
gcmarcal1 m ago

As I said, there is no common ground. I believe that CO-OP was the one …As I said, there is no common ground. I believe that CO-OP was the one that just accepted 5 years. If you had 10 years and moved to them and asked for a NCB proof on the following year. they would provide you with a 5 years proof. I can't say that is still like that as I left insurance in 2016.


I believe you, I'll bare that in mind!.
gcmarcal4 h, 10 m ago

There are no standards for NCB. you could have 10 years and then you move …There are no standards for NCB. you could have 10 years and then you move to another insurance where they just accept 5 years... Then you lose 5 years if you change on the next year ( or 4 if you want to be pedantic).By experience I would say that when you reach 5 years NCB you get the highest discount. Anything after that is almost insignificant. IF your premium do get lower it would be because of other factors like age, type of work, car model or where you live.


Thanks for the info - useful to know!
.MUFC.17th Jan

You only usually lose 2 years of your no claims if you're liable. The …You only usually lose 2 years of your no claims if you're liable. The insurance companies will usually increase your premium even though you have protected your no claims. It may be slightly beneficial protecting them if you've got less than 2 years no claims but the cost of your premium will rise. No claims protection is a big scam to extract extra money.


Can’t normally protect no claims until you have 4 or 5 years worth.
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