Heated clothes airer wanted

11
Posted 10th Oct
Hi all after one cheapest I can find is Argos at £30
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aldi.co.uk/hea…500


if you can find one instore they may be discounted.
Lakeland
The best one to get is the Lakeland dry soon, but I paid £160 worth it though
Or just buy a tumble dryer. Drying clothes indoors is bad for your health as it helps create mould from the high moisture level.
I'd rather buy a 3kg dryer for £130
Get a dehumidifier instead. Cheaper to run, less damaging to your clothes and no excess moisture in your house.
Van197311/10/2019 09:45

Get a dehumidifier instead. Cheaper to run, less damaging to your …Get a dehumidifier instead. Cheaper to run, less damaging to your clothes and no excess moisture in your house.


Depends as it’ll take moisture out of the air but not off surfaces or behind cabinets etc which will still get mouldy.
They're generally useless, so little of the clothes make contact with the heated part it barely does anything, the tent ones work a bit better. I just put an airer in front of the radiator...
Edited by: "dcx_badass" 11th Oct
cmdr_elito11/10/2019 12:40

Depends as it’ll take moisture out of the air but not off surfaces or b …Depends as it’ll take moisture out of the air but not off surfaces or behind cabinets etc which will still get mouldy.


No 'depends' about it, if the first part of your sentence happens (sufficient moisture is taken out of the air) then the second part of your sentence (condensation on cold surfaces) will not happen.

Removing water vapour from the air reduces the relative humidity and hence the dewpoint - if a room temperature is maintained at 20C and a dehumidifier operated to achieve a relative humidity of 50% then a surface would have to be below 8C to attract condensation. If no dehumidifier is used and clothing is dried in the house then a relative humidity of around 65% is very possible/likely - meaning condensation would occur on surfaces below 13C (most double glazed windows on cold days and on solid brick walls in poorly heated houses).
Van197312/10/2019 08:54

No 'depends' about it, if the first part of your sentence happens …No 'depends' about it, if the first part of your sentence happens (sufficient moisture is taken out of the air) then the second part of your sentence (condensation on cold surfaces) will not happen. Removing water vapour from the air reduces the relative humidity and hence the dewpoint - if a room temperature is maintained at 20C and a dehumidifier operated to achieve a relative humidity of 50% then a surface would have to be below 8C to attract condensation. If no dehumidifier is used and clothing is dried in the house then a relative humidity of around 65% is very possible/likely - meaning condensation would occur on surfaces below 13C (most double glazed windows on cold days and on solid brick walls in poorly heated houses).


The issue is that when you heat wet items the water is quickly added into the environment, the dehumidifier then removes it slowly over time and that water does go behind surfaces. Sure it may be an improvement on not using one but it’s better not to put the moisture into the environment (the air the home) in the first place. A tumble dryer is the best option but if you can’t have one as you don’t have and can’t make the space, Then a dehumidifier and heated rail might be an option for those who aren’t sensitive to moisture. I’m asthmatic so sensitive to mould/moisture and yes do own a dehumidifier (in the loft) and have a tumble dryer. Buying the tumble dryer massively improved my health and there isn’t any mould in the house anymore.
Edited by: "cmdr_elito" 12th Oct
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