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    Help Building Home Network (wired)

    Hi

    Currently re-wiring the electrics in house and thought be a good time to get a home wired network.

    Have

    X-box One.
    iMac
    PC
    Smart TV

    Unsure where the internet connection comes through atm but I'd want the router in the front top bedroom.

    Have a Middle Bedroom and Small Rear Bedroom. Then Downstairs 2 Living Rooms (Partition Wall Removed).

    What I want is each Bedroom to have an Ethernet Cable in. Also Downstairs I need Ethernet Cable in Front Living Room and 1 In Back Living Room. Kitchen nothing required.

    I want a fast connection here. 1000mbits I believe is the current norm.

    I;ve scrolled though some past HUKD Ask's and come up with the following:

    I think this will be suitable for my needs ... a NETGEAR GS308-100UKS 8 Port Gigabit Ethernet Desktop/Wallmount Switch
    amazon.co.uk/gp/…h=1

    Now whats the best way to do this.

    I will be using Virgin Media. So if their router is in my bedroom then thats enough for the 2 PC's.

    where would one place this switch? Also whats the best method of putting the ethernet cables in a hidden view? Carpets will be coming out so would taking some floor boards out and routing them that way be ok? Don't really want to be drilling through walls.

    Just want to know from some experience HUKD's what they found worked best and any useful hints and tips and what to look out for etc ...

    Also instead of an ethernet cable sticking out is there like a faceplate that can be connected to a wall that ethernet cable can then be connected to that? How would that be connected to the switch / router?

    20 Comments

    I did a simular thing in my last house, I had the switch in a cool cuboard under the stairs and fitted Ethernet sockets in all my rooms running all the cables to it.

    The router can be plugged into any of the sockets in any of the rooms.

    Look on CPC online for the sockets and faceplates for the rooms and get cat 6 cable.

    A network tester would help and they are cheap enough.

    You have a few choices. Regarding the main switch first; you can either put it in the same location as the router or run a network cable from the router to the location you want the switch at. You then run cables from each location back to this central point.

    You could also purchase 2 smaller switches instead (say for each floor) and connect them to the router, then wire the rooms on each floor to these switches.

    Are you lifting the floor?, you have a few options if so. You can either install conduit so they can be replaced and pulled through at a later date (can be a pain, expensive and time consuming), or run the cables directly through the floor joists.

    I drill the joists in the centre of the floor boards (if you have nailed plank floor boards) and the centre of their height. This is so any fixing that comes through the floorboard won't pierce the cable.
    You could also 'notch' out the top of the floor joist beneath the board and run essentially run it just underneath the board, but I prefer drilling a hole using a spade bit through the middle of them.

    You can also surface mount cables using stick-on trunking. This can be placed on the skirting and can be rather stealthy when installed correctly. Look up D-Line mini trunking for an idea. This can be used to getting the cable from the exit point in the room to the point of use.

    Regarding terminating the cables to faceplates on the wall. It really depends on how 'professional' you want to go.
    You can either terminate at a single wall box in each room using an RJ45 network face plate. This way you can buy a large spool of cat5 / cat6 and cut it to length and terminate them to the face plates. You then just run a cable from this face plate to your point of use.

    If you aren't too bothered at this point, you could use individual pre terminated lengths of cable.
    You would need to measure their length (from the switch to the point of use) and feed them through wall back boxes. Using this method you can use 'exit wall outlets face plates (with black or white brushes)' and pull the cable right through and plug it straight into the appliance. You can also use these for supplying hidden HDMI cables etc if you want to.

    Or if you really want to, you could just drill a hole through the floor right next to the skirting and pull the cable up through it.

    Just remember when feeding the cables through wherever you decide, try not to bend cables too sharply as his can be detrimental to their performance. I've seen cat6 running at only 100Mbit because of this. Also, try not to drill the holes too tight.
    I would check the cables with a network tester, or plug them into a router and attach a laptop etc. to check them upon installation.


    Edited by: "Flam3h" 15th Jul

    http://www.d-line-it.co.uk/images/tvfrontpageanim.gif

    https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/618ccKLTdlL._SY355_.jpg

    https://sparksdirect.scdn5.secure.raxcdn.com/image/cache/data/categories-opencart/3-switches-sockets/metal%20-%20flat%20plate/GET/GU7271WSS-550x550_0.jpg

    http://cdn3.techworld.com/cmsdata/features/3241468/205913-ethernet_ceiling_joist606_original.jpg

    Edited by: "Flam3h" 15th Jul

    Original Poster

    What I've done is bought these faceplates;

    amazon.co.uk/dp/…tem

    and this switch ...

    amazon.co.uk/dp/…tem

    Do you actually need a backbox for the faceplates or just two plugs and screws would be enough?

    Also ... any recommendations on cat5e cable reel ...

    Went for Cat5e as that would be more than enough for me and I believe its 1000mbit ... or should I future proof and go for cat6 ...

    Original Poster

    I've cancelled the faceplate as silly me buying in hurry will scour the market for some nice looking ones ... still getting the switch though

    Personally I use Cat6 cable. It tends to bit a bit tougher and not so flexible, but if you are going to the expense of doing it, don't cheap out on the cable.

    You will need wall back boxes for the face plates. Plastic dry lining/plasterboard back boxes for stud walls etc. or metal back boxes for solid walls (have to get out the SDS chisel or hammer and chisel).

    Or you can use the not so pretty surface mounted option (if you want) :-

    https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/41t7MDf%2BFoL._SY355_.jpg

    https://sparksdirect.scdn5.secure.raxcdn.com/image/cache/data/zencart/lights/backbox1-218x218_0.jpg

    http://s7g3.scene7.com/is/image//ae235?src=ae235/44827_P&$prodImageMedium$





    Edited by: "Flam3h" 15th Jul

    Original Poster

    Flam3h

    Personally I use Cat6 cable. It tends to bit a bit tougher and not so … Personally I use Cat6 cable. It tends to bit a bit tougher and not so flexible, but if you are going to the expense of doing it, don't cheap out on the cable.You will need wall back boxes for the face plates. Plastic plasterboard back boxes for stud walls etc. or metal back boxes for solid walls (have to get out the SDS chisel or hammer and chisel).



    Thanks for this ...

    Should be able to get the wiring done through the walls etc ...

    In terms of cable ... should it be pre-crimped or do you have to crimp it yourself?

    Been watching some youtube videos on how to crimp ... seems a logical process

    Original Poster

    Flam3h

    Personally I use Cat6 cable. It tends to bit a bit tougher and not so … Personally I use Cat6 cable. It tends to bit a bit tougher and not so flexible, but if you are going to the expense of doing it, don't cheap out on the cable.You will need wall back boxes for the face plates. Plastic dry lining/plasterboard back boxes for stud walls etc. or metal back boxes for solid walls (have to get out the SDS chisel or hammer and chisel).Or you can use the not so pretty surface mounted option (if you want) :-



    Sorry to ask .. the backbox are they the same as the ones used for electrical plug sockets ... can you use the same one? I assume a standard size ...

    Yes, any of the standard back boxes (to suit your mounting choice). You should be able to get some nice metal finished RJ45 face plates if you look around (if it's something you want).

    Yes, crimp the cables yourself. Start by feeding the cable through the first back box still attached to the spool and proceed to the opposite box and leave a bit of length for terminating. As you mentioned, have a look around on YouTube on how to crimp. Good luck.

    If using the metal back boxes, it is a good idea use the appropriate grommets to protect the cable.



    Edited by: "Flam3h" 15th Jul

    I would recommend running trunking between the two floors as it will be easier to swap out the cables as technology improves. Could possibly be swapping to 10gbit+ fibre in the next 10 years.

    Also 100% check your cable is 100% copper and not copper coated aluminium or worse some weird steel junk.

    Original Poster

    kester76

    I would recommend running trunking between the two floors as it will be … I would recommend running trunking between the two floors as it will be easier to swap out the cables as technology improves. Could possibly be swapping to 10gbit+ fibre in the next 10 years.Also 100% check your cable is 100% copper and not copper coated aluminium or worse some weird steel junk.



    This cabling seem goood?

    cabling4less.co.uk/pro…le/

    Ideally wanted to get the cable today cos electrician working today ... was thinking maplins but dont know if thats good quality

    krazyasif7864 h, 26 m ago

    This cabling seem goood? …This cabling seem goood? http://www.cabling4less.co.uk/products/2450/cat_6_23awg_solid_copper_lszh_installation_network_utp_cable/Ideally wanted to get the cable today cos electrician working today ... was thinking maplins but dont know if thats good quality

    No idea to be honest. There's no enforced standard on ethernet cable so cat 6e could be worse than cat 5 depending on the quality of the cable. I binned 350m of CCA cat 6 cable due to not checking the specs properly.

    I would ask the electrician what he installs or get him to install trunking so you can rod the cable in later.

    Flam3h21 h, 57 m ago

    You have a few choices. Regarding the main switch first; you can either …You have a few choices. Regarding the main switch first; you can either put it in the same location as the router or run a network cable from the router to the location you want the switch at. You then run cables from each location back to this central point.You could also purchase 2 smaller switches instead (say for each floor) and connect them to the router, then wire the rooms on each floor to these switches.Are you lifting the floor?, you have a few options if so. You can either install conduit so they can be replaced and pulled through at a later date (can be a pain, expensive and time consuming), or run the cables directly through the floor joists. I drill the joists in the centre of the floor boards (if you have nailed plank floor boards) and the centre of their height. This is so any fixing that comes through the floorboard won't pierce the cable. You could also 'notch' out the top of the floor joist beneath the board and run essentially run it just underneath the board, but I prefer drilling a hole using a spade bit through the middle of them.You can also surface mount cables using stick-on trunking. This can be placed on the skirting and can be rather stealthy when installed correctly. Look up D-Line mini trunking for an idea. This can be used to getting the cable from the exit point in the room to the point of use.Regarding terminating the cables to faceplates on the wall. It really depends on how 'professional' you want to go. You can either terminate at a single wall box in each room using an RJ45 network face plate. This way you can buy a large spool of cat5 / cat6 and cut it to length and terminate them to the face plates. You then just run a cable from this face plate to your point of use.If you aren't too bothered at this point, you could use individual pre terminated lengths of cable. You would need to measure their length (from the switch to the point of use) and feed them through wall back boxes. Using this method you can use 'exit wall outlets face plates (with black or white brushes)' and pull the cable right through and plug it straight into the appliance. You can also use these for supplying hidden HDMI cables etc if you want to.Or if you really want to, you could just drill a hole through the floor right next to the skirting and pull the cable up through it.Just remember when feeding the cables through wherever you decide, try not to bend cables too sharply as his can be detrimental to their performance. I've seen cat6 running at only 100Mbit because of this. Also, try not to drill the holes too tight. I would check the cables with a network tester, or plug them into a router and attach a laptop etc. to check them upon installation.

    Was there a reason you drilled the joists rather than ran cables underneath? If the last photo you showed was your handy work I'm not sure why you did hang the cables underneath. I had drilling joists where possible let as it can weaken their load bearing ability.

    When I cabled my last house I ran circular trunking under the floor when I was rewiring the house. All cables ran back to the cupboard in the hallway where my Switch and NAS were stored.

    I'd run CAT6, it's better shielded and protects against being pinched and caught. If you're terminating cables into a box above, get a decent crimp\punch tool. The plastic throw away ones are rubbish and don't work.

    Don't overcomplicate the install. Most electric cables go up the cavity wall, so just get electrician to pull a network cable up at same time.
    Just hope you didn't get cavity wall "insulation"

    darlodge

    Was there a reason you drilled the joists rather than ran cables … Was there a reason you drilled the joists rather than ran cables underneath? If the last photo you showed was your handy work I'm not sure why you did hang the cables underneath. I had drilling joists where possible let as it can weaken their load bearing ability.When I cabled my last house I ran circular trunking under the floor when I was rewiring the house. All cables ran back to the cupboard in the hallway where my Switch and NAS were stored.I'd run CAT6, it's better shielded and protects against being pinched and caught. If you're terminating cables into a box above, get a decent crimp\punch tool. The plastic throw away ones are rubbish and don't work.



    It was just a generic photo.

    I think drilling in the centre of the joists is better practice. It stops someone accidently putting a nail/screw through the floor into the cables. If they were electric cables, I'm pretty sure it wouldn't meet building regs if they ran just underneath the floorboards and would need to be drilled through the joists.

    However, I'm not an electrician and I don't think network cables are even part of this regulation. But for me, it's just my personal preference (though maybe not necessary).

    Quick reference guide from familyhandyman.com (American, but principles still the same)

    Joist Boring Rules:

    Holes must be at least 2 in. from the top and bottom edges of a joist (keep the hole central).
    Maximum hole size is one-third of the joist depth.

    Joist Notching Rules:

    The maximum depth of a notch at the end of a joist (where it rests on a wall or beam) can’t exceed one-quarter of the joist depth.
    Maximum notch depth in the outer third of a joist is one-sixth of the joist depth.
    Limit the length of notches to one-third of the joist depth.
    No notching in the middle third of a joist.


    Edited by: "Flam3h" 16th Jul

    My only reference is my Father-in-law who was a sparky and he drummed it into me to avoid knotching or drilling joists but he's old school and I'm not sure if there was any grounding based on his opinion

    Building regs seems to allow drilling joists but like you say, I'm not sure whether ether ethernet comes under the scope of electrical fitting.

    Original Poster

    Flam3h

    It was just a generic photo. I think drilling in the centre of the joists … It was just a generic photo. I think drilling in the centre of the joists is better practice. It stops someone accidently putting a nail/screw through the floor into the cables. If they were electric cables, I'm pretty sure it wouldn't meet building regs if they ran just underneath the floorboards and would need to be drilled through the joists.However, I'm not an electrician and I don't think network cables are even part of this regulation. But for me, it's just my personal preference (though maybe not necessary).Quick reference guide from familyhandyman.com (American, but principles still the same)Joist Boring Rules:Holes must be at least 2 in. from the top and bottom edges of a joist (keep the hole central).Maximum hole size is one-third of the joist depth.Joist Notching Rules:The maximum depth of a notch at the end of a joist (where it rests on a wall or beam) can’t exceed one-quarter of the joist depth.Maximum notch depth in the outer third of a joist is one-sixth of the joist depth.Limit the length of notches to one-third of the joist depth.No notching in the middle third of a joist.




    I'm going for drilling underfloor boards joists... one thing to ask can the copper ethernet cable be placed next to electrical cable or should they be a certain distance apart ... in terms of noise/interference etc

    gone for cat6 cable and ports etc
    Edited by: "krazyasif786" 17th Jul

    krazyasif78621 m ago

    I'm going for drilling underfloor boards joists... one thing to ask can …I'm going for drilling underfloor boards joists... one thing to ask can the copper ethernet cable be placed next to electrical cable or should they be a certain distance apart ... in terms of noise/interference etcgone for cat6 cable and ports etc


    Advice used to be to run them separate - but in every office I've ever worked in the network cables have been run alongside the ring main cables inside Dado type trunking.

    When I wired my home network c.15 years ago I ran the network cables away from all mains cables when I could - I ran them together for short distances when it was convenient/necessary to do so. All works and never had any noticeable restrictions.

    krazyasif786

    I'm going for drilling underfloor boards joists... one thing to ask … I'm going for drilling underfloor boards joists... one thing to ask can the copper ethernet cable be placed next to electrical cable or should they be a certain distance apart ... in terms of noise/interference etcgone for cat6 cable and ports etc



    I'm the same as Van1973,

    Personally I ran mine in seperate holes away from electrical cables. I tried to avoid running them parallel, much like audio/video cables. You will get areas where there is crossover, but for the main I just like to seperate them by around 50mm minimum.

    It 'might' be OK to run them parallel, but I'd rather not discover issues later on when the floor is back down. There might be shielded cables / ducting suited for running them next to power cables.



    Edited by: "Flam3h" 18th Jul
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