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    Help needed with 9 year old's homework.

    My little one has been off school sick and went back today.
    She has brought home some science homework, but she has missed the lessons leading up to it. She has to write 1 page, in the style of a magazine article, on the topic of burning.
    Could anyone please point me in the direction of any KS2 articles on burning? Or are there any teachers out there who could give me some clues about what is expected ?
    Thank you in advance for your help.

    20 Comments

    atschool.co.uk/def…asp

    Might be some info here.Why couldn't it just be on a piece of paper instead of a layout of a magazine article,not like its media studies or whatever,schools waste time.
    Yeh science I'm rubbish at it,had no interest at all towards the end,didn't get my G.C.S.E in it either.

    Just grab a mag, look at a single page article, and use it as a template for daughters article.

    Eg: Draw ruled lines to make sections and the layout the same as the mag. A Box where the title should be, a box for a pic, etc

    Then fill in the boxes with what your daughters knows on burning / google what your looking for.

    Im guessing its an article about the process of burning? How it needs oxygen to burn etc.

    See if she could create a feature for her article on what makes things burn easy. Whats extremely flammable etc

    What uses people get from burning. Fossil fuels. Burning fuels to cook / wood for survival etc.

    Feature for safety, preventing burning.

    Hope you got some ideas from this.

    Original Poster

    Mum2Connor&Cerys

    ]http://www.atschool.co.uk/default.aspMight be some info here.Why … ]http://www.atschool.co.uk/default.aspMight be some info here.Why couldn't it just be on a piece of paper instead of a layout of a magazine article,not like its media studies or whatever,schools waste time.Yeh science I'm rubbish at it,had no interest at all towards the end,didn't get my G.C.S.E in it either.



    Thank you for this...but when I clicked on the link there is a £9.99 subscription charge to look at the fact sheets.
    Are there any free articles?

    I've googled a lot for you, and the only objective at KS2 is:

    "Burning is an example of an irreversible change. For example, when you burn wood for example, ash and smoke are formed. You cannot change the ash and smoke back to wood again. "

    So as to how you write a whole article around this, I haven't a clue !

    Christmasshopper

    Thank you for this...but when I clicked on the link there is a £9.99 … Thank you for this...but when I clicked on the link there is a £9.99 subscription charge to look at the fact sheets.Are there any free articles?




    Damn you think it be free, being education and all,I never been on these type of sites before.

    ]Here's The link to where melissab found her info:thumbsup:
    I'd put lots of pictures as at KS2 that was the best way for me to understand things. Also think about putting something about reversible chages as a comparison such as melting ice then refreezeing:thumbsup:

    Original Poster

    melissab

    I've googled a lot for you, and the only objective at KS2 is:"Burning is … I've googled a lot for you, and the only objective at KS2 is:"Burning is an example of an irreversible change. For example, when you burn wood for example, ash and smoke are formed. You cannot change the ash and smoke back to wood again. "So as to how you write a whole article around this, I haven't a clue !



    Maybe that is why they have asked for it in the style of a magazine article. Perhaps she is meant to put plenty of pictures in.
    During her last lesson before she was sick the class learned about bunsen burners and she drew pictures of the different coloured flames. Maybe she could put this into her magazine article too.
    Thank you all for your help. Rep left for all of you.
    Any more suggestions will be gratefully received.

    Original Poster

    Any more suggestions?

    Banned

    Give her a lighter and a magazine to take to class, actions speak louder than words.

    I'm not sure what age Ks2 is (darn our different education systems :lol: )
    I don't know if she'll have covered by products you could add that maybe.
    Edit: just read the post title :lol: sorry
    Shame it wasn't a history lesson

    with nov 5th not far off, could you include a picture of a bonfire and Guy Fawkes, and write th article as though she was a reporter at the time?

    Get one piece of a paper. Lay it out as described above. With pictures etc almost like a poster. Have descriptions under neath each picture explaining the process..
    have a pic of burning charcoal and write this underneath..Charcoal is made by the controlled burning of wood, where there is insufficient air for complete combustion. Air is present in the gaps between stacked logs, and in the pores of the wood. All other sources are controlled by the charcoal burner, through vents at the base of the kiln.

    The heat from the fire in the centre of the stack raises the temperature inside the kiln. The water content in the wood is then driven off as steam; this is followed by a chemical breakdown releasing carbon dioxide and volatile products such as tar, oils and naphtha. A small fire in the center of the heap is able to carbonize the whole kiln with relatively little wood being burned away.

    Charcoal burning is dirty and time consuming. Much skill is needed to produce charcoal properly. A typical burn will take anything from 18-36 hours, depending on weather conditions and the moisture content of the wood. Closing the kiln down too early will result in "brown ends", the wood only being scorched. Too much air will substantially reduce the final yield of charcoal.

    The final product is a solid black residue with a high carbon content (about 30%). Also present are Hydrogen (10%), Oxygen (5%) and mineral ash with trace elements of Potassium, Sulphur and Nitrogen

    he Molecular Scale
    Stage I. Heating an external source supplies heat causing the temperature of the substance to increase. The extent of temperature change depends on the specific heat of the material.
    Stage II. Transition physical, mechanical, and thermal properties change. This may include melting or vaporization of the substance and may involve softening in the case of polymers.
    Stage III. Degradation thermally unstable bonds begin to break. Materials such as polymers may melt before (or as) they burn.
    Stage IV. Decomposition at still higher temperatures the majority of the bonds reach failure point, causing the release of gaseous molecules which differ depending on the material that's burning.
    Stage V. Oxidation in the presence of oxygen at high temperatures, oxidation of the gaseous fragments proceeds rapidly producing heat, flame, and combustion products (mostly carbon dioxide and water......
    do what i done go to google and search... use the information available to help with your work. I often do this with my daughter and we make it a fun thing to do together.
    Do it on Pc in word, print it off when finished.

    For everyones info - KS2 in 10-11 year olds.....

    jennybubbles

    I'm not sure what age Ks2 is (darn our different education systems :lol: )



    Does this mean you are in Scotland? The land where schools are so much easier to understand and education is so much better than in England? (I am not slating the English at all.) Just the schools are so difficult to understand how they work. For example, in Scotland primary school is just one school that your child attends, starting in Primary 1 and leaving after Primary 7. Whereas in England sometimes children have to attend an Infant school then a completely different Junior School.

    jennybubbles, (or anyone else, if you are in Scotland), maybe you can answer a question I have been wondering for ages. What age do children start school in Scotland?

    Down here the cut off date is 31 August. So, if your school has only one intake in September then a child could have their 4th birthday on 31 August and around 4, 5 or 6 days later start school.
    Sorry to waffle on. As for the question about burning, sorry can't help. Would have asked my scientist hubby but he is on a plane to the States as I write.

    Becksdawe

    For everyones info - KS2 in 10-11 year olds.....



    I thought KS2 was the whole of Junior school? - ie. 7 to 11 year olds?

    slightly off topic, but i have never quite understood the Key stages, but this might just clarify it a little...

    Key Stage 1
    Pupils in Years 1 and 2 are at Key Stage 1.
    Age range: 5 - 7
    (Infant pupils)

    Key Stage 2
    Pupils in Years 3, 4, 5 and 6 are at Key Stage 2.
    Age range: 7 - 11
    (Junior pupils)

    Key Stage 3
    Pupils in Years 7, 8 and 9 are at Key Stage 3.
    Age range: 11 - 14
    (Lower Secondary pupils)

    Key Stage 4
    Pupils in Years 10 and 11 are at Key Stage 4.
    Age range: 14-16
    (Upper Secondary Pupils)

    Perhaps it might help if she invites a friend over and they work on their homework together? Friend might be able to explain a bit more of what is expected

    Still need help with this?

    Hi there,

    I looked on the web for your daughter and the ideal site is:
    primaryresources.co.uk/onl…swf

    If you follow this link, it should be exactly what you are looking for!

    All the best, Leska

    Hi again,
    I just followed through the link- if you type in 'fire' into the search, then you should find the link if you can't get it through clicking on to the web address.

    All the best!
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