Help with finding correct IT Technician course please.

Hi Guys, I have been tinkering with computers for years now. My life circumstances have change I am hoping to work for myself in the future. I would like to repair computers. I'm quite savvy on hardware but not OS. Could anyone point me in the right direction please, I'm looking for a course/ training that offers Hardware and software knowledge. Thanks again

21 Comments

go speak to your local career advisory service.
they will steer you in right direction

Aim for comptia a+. Industry standard and very useful

Original Poster

corrazy

Aim for comptia a+. Industry standard and very useful


I'm just watching an older version on YouTube. Thank you

Would it be possible to offer to work for free for a computer repair shop to learn the trade?

Comptia A+ and some MTA courses

Original Poster

mutley1

Would it be possible to offer to work for free for a computer repair shop … Would it be possible to offer to work for free for a computer repair shop to learn the trade?


The thing is I live in a town where there is only 1 ( if you believe it ) IT repair shop!! and there are only 25 thousand people here. The prices they charge are criminal! ( I suspect they will not like it! ) worth an ask though!

Original Poster

WesD84

Comptia A+ and some MTA courses


Excellent, Thank you

mrman007

The thing is I live in a town where there is only 1 ( if you believe it ) … The thing is I live in a town where there is only 1 ( if you believe it ) IT repair shop!! and there are only 25 thousand people here. The prices they charge are criminal! ( I suspect they will not like it! ) worth an ask though!


I'd say definitely do you research, there is a shop behind morrisons here (currently empty) and over the past 7 years maybe 8 different companies and have moved in and shut down - they were computer shops each time. Countless ones have also shut down along our high street too, some have stayed though since I was a teenager so they are doing something right.

High prices from competitors may suggest low trade (not enough profit to continue at 'fair' prices), also my facebook local buy/sell is always spammed with people offering computer repair services

best of luck with it like, I do freelance web development and the occasional repair from home

mrman007

The thing is I live in a town where there is only 1 ( if you believe it ) … The thing is I live in a town where there is only 1 ( if you believe it ) IT repair shop!! and there are only 25 thousand people here. The prices they charge are criminal! ( I suspect they will not like it! ) worth an ask though!



People are often very keen to get free labour! They may get you to do things unrelated to what you want to learn as they want to make use of your free labour, but if you get on with them with time, you can start to have some influence and get them to teach you things.

Original Poster

murtgurge

I'd say definitely do you research, there is a shop behind morrisons here … I'd say definitely do you research, there is a shop behind morrisons here (currently empty) and over the past 7 years maybe 8 different companies and have moved in and shut down - they were computer shops each time. Countless ones have also shut down along our high street too, some have stayed though since I was a teenager so they are doing something right.High prices from competitors may suggest low trade (not enough profit to continue at 'fair' prices), also my facebook local buy/sell is always spammed with people offering computer repair servicesbest of luck with it like, I do freelance web development and the occasional repair from home


Thank you, I do intend to work from home as I have ample room so no storefront needed. I've been down that road before and after rent rates VAT etc you're left with not much to show for 100 hours of your week. I'll have to test the waters but if I don't try!! Thanks for the great info!

Original Poster

mutley1

People are often very keen to get free labour! They may get you to do … People are often very keen to get free labour! They may get you to do things unrelated to what you want to learn as they want to make use of your free labour, but if you get on with them with time, you can start to have some influence and get them to teach you things.


Great advise thank you Mutley

Original Poster

sylviasmith944

https://www.technibble.com/forums/You could try posting on this forum


Bookmarked! Thank you very much!

I have worked as a workshop technician for free but it was via the job centre as the shops are not interested due to insurance considerations.

The shop i worked for barely made any money with the owner fiddling tax etc.

Most people dont get their laptop fixed but buy a new one instead.
I dont personnally think that pc shops are viable anymore

It's VERY hard to make money in IT, no one values skills/experience at the Hardware level like this, even the public that you'd be working for aren't interested.

I live in an area with NO computer shops for 30 miles & its still really hard to pick up work, even offering fixed price repairs, no call out fees.

It's the same with employers none of them have any respect for what you can do.

I wouldn't get too hung up on the OS just pick up the troubleshooting basics, if a repair will take longer than 30 mins to figure out then just reload the OS

Get yourself a nice big portable hard drive so you've got enough room to backup customers data if you do need to format & reload. Get USB drives preloaded with a boot cd tool like UBCD, Windows 10 install with both 32 & 64 bit via menu, Windows XP, 7 & 8 I'm pretty sure you could combine them onto one drive if necessary or put one on each drive. Obviously you won't be installing them without keys but most of the time the customer won't have the media so you'll be saving yourself a lot of messing about & time if you have copies of everything

Id look at A+ & Network+ certs I'd really look at getting work from local SMBs so basic networking skills are crucial too especially as even consumers are using large(ish) networks at home with a combination of cables, wireless & powerline stuff
Edited by: "Rich44" 29th Jan

Original Poster

trott3r

I have worked as a workshop technician for free but it was via the job … I have worked as a workshop technician for free but it was via the job centre as the shops are not interested due to insurance considerations.The shop i worked for barely made any money with the owner fiddling tax etc.Most people dont get their laptop fixed but buy a new one instead.I dont personnally think that pc shops are viable anymore


Thanks for the info

Original Poster

Rich44

It's VERY hard to make money in IT, no one values skills/experience at … It's VERY hard to make money in IT, no one values skills/experience at the Hardware level like this, even the public that you'd be working for aren't interested. I live in an area with NO computer shops for 30 miles & its still really hard to pick up work, even offering fixed price repairs, no call out fees. It's the same with employers none of them have any respect for what you can do. I wouldn't get too hung up on the OS just pick up the troubleshooting basics, if a repair will take longer than 30 mins to figure out then just reload the OS Get yourself a nice big portable hard drive so you've got enough room to backup customers data if you do need to format & reload. Get USB drives preloaded with a boot cd tool like UBCD, Windows 10 install with both 32 & 64 bit via menu, Windows XP, 7 & 8 I'm pretty sure you could combine them onto one drive if necessary or put one on each drive. Obviously you won't be installing them without keys but most of the time the customer won't have the media so you'll be saving yourself a lot of messing about & time if you have copies of everything Id look at A+ & Network+ certs I'd really look at getting work from local SMBs so basic networking skills are crucial too especially as even consumers are using large(ish) networks at home with a combination of cables, wireless & powerline stuff


That's great advice, Thankyou very much

There is often a route into IT support by taking a first line Helpdesk job no ask for the chance to advance through the support line.
Helpdesk is not the best job in the world but you do learn a lot and often a chance to take courses.

Original Poster

mosskeeto

There is often a route into IT support by taking a first line Helpdesk … There is often a route into IT support by taking a first line Helpdesk job no ask for the chance to advance through the support line.Helpdesk is not the best job in the world but you do learn a lot and often a chance to take courses.


Smashing will look into that. Thank you

mosskeeto

There is often a route into IT support by taking a first line Helpdesk … There is often a route into IT support by taking a first line Helpdesk job no ask for the chance to advance through the support line.Helpdesk is not the best job in the world but you do learn a lot and often a chance to take courses.



This is the best advice, to become a full contractor and actually be successful you'll need to start somewhere. It's where I began and my next step is to begin the contract route. The local pc repair should be looked as a side project but you need to remember to declare monies in and out to ensure you conform with vat and tax regulations. Someone mentioned SMB's above and while that would become viable, you need to make sure you can devote enough time to that as it'll need more than your average desktop windows troubleshooting and may move into other apps, exchange/sql/netscaler/xenapp which at the beginning can be very daunting. Grab a year in a service desk, when you show those higher in the chain you're willing to learn and progress, you'll get moved up quickly.

Being in a position above the desk, you see and can influence those and help them improve their Ganges of progressing. Those that don't want to learn stay behind while you flourish

Original Poster

corrazy

This is the best advice, to become a full contractor and actually be … This is the best advice, to become a full contractor and actually be successful you'll need to start somewhere. It's where I began and my next step is to begin the contract route. The local pc repair should be looked as a side project but you need to remember to declare monies in and out to ensure you conform with vat and tax regulations. Someone mentioned SMB's above and while that would become viable, you need to make sure you can devote enough time to that as it'll need more than your average desktop windows troubleshooting and may move into other apps, exchange/sql/netscaler/xenapp which at the beginning can be very daunting. Grab a year in a service desk, when you show those higher in the chain you're willing to learn and progress, you'll get moved up quickly. Being in a position above the desk, you see and can influence those and help them improve their Ganges of progressing. Those that don't want to learn stay behind while you flourish


Thanks for that, my friend started at Sitel from being a Postman, Then worked in an accounts department helpline and has now landed a nice Job indeed with Government Sites.
Post a comment
Avatar
@
    Text
    Top Discussions
    1. Problem with new double glazed installation66
    2. whats a worthy sony x3 compact replacement?49
    3. Buyers Surveyor undervalued our house44
    4. Does Tesco call you after a delivery?45

    See more discussions