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    Hi, i really need your help.

    Hi, i really need your help. Please advise which direction should i lay my flooring? WIll appreciate that immensely.

    27 Comments

    lengthwise from light source

    Horizontal.

    In direction of light source (ie window/door/patio door) or lengthways down the longest route (ie hallway lay going down to the rear) make your rooms look bigger imo

    On the floor.

    Top to bottom.

    Diagonal starting at head height

    Whichever way is easiest and looks best. I have just finished doing my kitchen diner. I started laying it along the longest axis first of all as it would mean fewer cuts. It would not play ball in any way shape or form so I laid it the other way and it was fine

    East

    Whichever way looks best/is easiest to lay.

    Technically I should've laid ours the other way in the hall but it would've then meant cutting planks down their length which would've been a right pita.

    So went the other way meaning I was just cutting a few inches off the end of planks instead, tbh I think it looks just as good & it was much faster with less waste.

    Just got the living room to do now....

    Good luck with it

    I would go with cheapest and easiest option pointless wasting money and time where its not needed.

    vertically

    amazed at the other comments when someone needs help , you should lay laminate 90degrees to the way your floorboards run or theyll dip and it wont look flat for long , always use a foam or board underlay never lay it on top of carpet or carpet underlay , cut the bottoms of your door casing off and slide the boards underneath , you can either pull your skirting boards off then fit the laminate under where the skirting sits then refit the skirting back onto the wall or use edging strips to cover the gap youll have where the laminate meets the skirting , edging is expensive though so refitting the skirting is cheaper , caulk the top of the skirting boards and where the door casing meets thr flooring it makes the room look so much newer

    I lay flooring parallel to the longest wall. it's gives the illusion that the room is long and much bigger than it actually is.

    length ways in the direction of light .

    The above answer is the best so far and although I prefer laminate flooring to go under the skirting boards for the cost of four or five lengths of edging I would be leaving my skirting where it is. I glued mine on so not easily taken off without causing some wall damage. I always run mine from the longest length of the room or from the doorway walking into the room. In my kitchen in didn't matter as it's square tile laminate. Strange thing though is room by room I find I am removing all my laminate and replacing with carpet. Dining room, hall and study are all now back to carpet with just the kitchen and utility left as laminate. It's handy having a carpet fitter in the family !!
    Edited by: "Smartguy1" 24th Feb

    tomminator

    amazed at the other comments when someone needs help , you should lay … amazed at the other comments when someone needs help , you should lay laminate 90degrees to the way your floorboards run or theyll dip and it wont look flat for long , always use a foam or board underlay never lay it on top of carpet or carpet underlay , cut the bottoms of your door casing off and slide the boards underneath , you can either pull your skirting boards off then fit the laminate under where the skirting sits then refit the skirting back onto the wall or use edging strips to cover the gap youll have where the laminate meets the skirting , edging is expensive though so refitting the skirting is cheaper , caulk the top of the skirting boards and where the door casing meets thr flooring it makes the room look so much newer



    Except most houses won't have floorboards it'll either be great slabs of wood or concrete. I'd have thought if you had floorboards you'd be better off stripping & polishing them than buying laminate.

    As for quadrant/"edging" it is expensive from the local high street, we live near a trade wood yard we picked up the exact same stuff that homebase, b&q etc sell 2.4m long sections for £1.50 per length and where a couple had knots in he said here take an extra one to make up for the knots in that one.

    Really worth seeing if you've a local wood yard we buy all our stuff from there costs a tiny fraction of what a diy store charges
    Edited by: "Rich44" 24th Feb

    Also, if your removing the skirting, buy some Decorators Caulk, which was recommend for gluing gaps and is cheap.

    Not to mention that if decent floorboards have been put down properly on good joists and not disturbed they should still be as good as the day they went down. I hate exposed floor boards and would much rather see a proper wood floor laid professionally. The silkflor one either oiled or lacquered looks amazing but very expensive. We sell it where I work and after seeing that I would never lay a B & Q or similar laminate floor again.

    Millionvoltage

    Also, if your removing the skirting, buy some Decorators Caulk, which was … Also, if your removing the skirting, buy some Decorators Caulk, which was recommend for gluing gaps and is cheap.


    And paintable

    By getting someone else to do it ;).

    I have just re-read the question it may not be laminate as most people assume it just says flooring maybe it's real wood slabs or tiles whom the mystery continues will wait for op to confirm what they have learnt from this thread.

    Typically they say flooring should run with the source of light, but it's your floor so do what you like best. Lay some out on the floor so you can get an idea of what it will look like. This works with laminate and tiles. If it's carpet, lay it the way it fits

    ohdaesu

    lengthwise from light source



    Pay a man to do it for you..

    Mikeygolfgt

    I lay flooring parallel to the longest wall. it's gives the illusion that … I lay flooring parallel to the longest wall. it's gives the illusion that the room is long and much bigger than it actually is.



    I normally lay the opposite, parallel to the shortest wall to make it look wider..

    No 'right' way to lay flooring though really, as someone has stated earlier sometimes easiest, or which means less cuts is the best.



    Edited by: "andynicol" 25th Feb

    Starting is the hardest bit so you need a good straight wall to pack against so think about that

    rich have you ever tried sanding floorboards? laminates much harder wearing than any varnish , also I think you'll find that wood from your local timber yard is just beading , edging strips are colour coded plus removing the skirting gives a much cleaner finish to the whole room plus you can get a pack fron wickes that's mdf and that'll bend a bit helping you to cover a multitude of sins , most walls are never straight or square it comes preprimed if you even want to paint it
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