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    High Gain Wireless USB Adapter , please help

    My brother is complaining that his rented shared accomodation has a very weak signal in his laptop , so he is looking to buy the product listed below , I know nothing about it is he .. your help is appreciated.

    amazon.co.uk/Wir…-39

    11 Comments

    I can't see that it would make much of a difference, if any. The better option would be a homeplug.

    Original Poster

    Wireless N/G 802.11n/g USB WiFi WLAN Network Adapter (Realtek RTL8191US) with high gain 5dBi Antenna Up to 300Mbps
    by Generic, unbranded

    £ 11.00

    Original Poster

    Predikuesi

    I can't see that it would make much of a difference, if any. The better … I can't see that it would make much of a difference, if any. The better option would be a homeplug.

    yeh .. i thought about that but i have to spend atleast 35 quid to get that , this one is only £ 11 if it is good !

    JVB

    yeh .. i thought about that but i have to spend atleast 35 quid to get … yeh .. i thought about that but i have to spend atleast 35 quid to get that , this one is only £ 11 if it is good !




    The problem with that is it might be £11.00 down the drain. I'd go for what it guaranteed to work even if it costs a bit more.
    Edited by: "Predikuesi" 16th Jun 2011

    Original Poster

    yeh .. i am thinking about it ...mhhh

    Predikuesi

    The problem with that is it might be £11.00 down the drain. I'd go for … The problem with that is it might be £11.00 down the drain. I'd go for what it guaranteed to work even if it costs a bit more.


    dcx_badass

    If the router isn't N then he really won't gain anything. Can he not just … If the router isn't N then he really won't gain anything. Can he not just run a cable, that's what I'm doing in my student flat next year.



    don't be fooled, all the clients on a 802.11n network HAVE to run 802.11n its take one device to run at 802.11g and the router will drop the the whole wifi network to 802.11g.

    dcx_badass

    WRONG. That depends on the router. Mine I am using right now, my desktop … WRONG. That depends on the router. Mine I am using right now, my desktop is running at 802.11N and my laptop and server are on 802.11G




    its not wrong unless the router has two radios which is 2 NETWORKS, I used singular not plural silly boy.

    dcx_badass

    I have one network, one SSID and I'm running at 802.11N and 802.11G at … I have one network, one SSID and I'm running at 802.11N and 802.11G at the same time. Mindblowing,



    yeah you can do that on a router with 2 radios on its MB, don't believe me check IEEE standards and caveats, sorry just completed my refresh on 802.11n and clean air technologies, you are wrong.

    sorry should of added its very easy to advertise one SSID on all frequencies across many APs 802.11a/b/g and n MIND BLOWING


    Edited by: "Alfonse" 16th Jun 2011

    How does the 802.11n backward compatibility "mixed mode" mechanism operate? What are the tradeoffs from a deployment point of view? Should enterprises avoid the use of mixed mode?
    In mixed mode operation the 802.11a/g preamble is prefixed to the 802.11n preamble. The 802.11a/g preamble can be decoded by legacy devices and can be used to instruct them to keep off the air while the (undecodable) 802.11n packet is being transmitted. The deployment tradeoffs are similar to that of running a mixed 802.11b/g network: the use of the 802.11a/g preamble introduces a lot of overhead and slows down the overall network. Also in mixed mode you can't really use the 40 MHz option and this further reduces the available BW

    tp-link.com/sup…229

    Q: If I have a mixed network of 802.11n and previous generation Wi-Fi gear (802.11 a/b/g), can I still get the benefits of 802.11n?

    A: 802.11n gear is backward-compatible with 802.11 a/b/g gear that operates in the same frequency bands. When using an 802.11n router (access point), you will probably see some performance improvements on a mixed network, but the dramatic range and throughput improvements are only possible when both client and network devices are 802.11n.
    Edited by: "Alfonse" 16th Jun 2011

    dcx_badass

    I have one network, one SSID and I'm running at 802.11N and 802.11G at … I have one network, one SSID and I'm running at 802.11N and 802.11G at the same time. Mindblowing,



    lol, owned
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