High pitched hissing sound from Nikon MH-24 charger

21
Found 24th Mar 2016
Evening everyone,

I have a Nikon MH-24 battery charger which when plugged in specifically with a battery it makes a high pitched hissing noise which obviously isn't normal.

Since I have another I have tried different combinations and I am certain it is not related to the battery and it is specifically this one charger and only makes the noise when a battery is inserted. Anyhow today I opened it up to have a look inside to see if it was a genuine Nikon charger and sure enough it is.

Now can anyone tell me what part is the likely cause of this noise? I have looked carefully and all the soldering joints look okay and no caps have popped, I only have a basic knowledge of electronics but a little more than the average person I would say.
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21 Comments
Busted transformer/inverter?

Personally, whatever the issue is, I would not be using it

Edited by: "YouDontWantToKnow" 24th Mar 2016
YouDontWantToKnow

Busted transformer/inverter? Personally, whatever the issue is, I would … Busted transformer/inverter? Personally, whatever the issue is, I would not be using it



Thanks for your response.

Yeah, to be honest that's what I was thinking (transformer). The only other suggestion I see online was a reforming transistor but I no idea on what that exactly means.

I won't be using it unattended and only to test. I am merely trying to find out more out of interest.


Edited by: "joshp" 24th Mar 2016
Any capacitors inside? electrolytic caps can go bad and whistle
nexus1972

Any capacitors inside? electrolytic caps can go bad and whistle



Yes, there are a few inside. If I test them with a multimeter will I be able to tell if this is the issue?
joshp

Yes, there are a few inside. If I test them with a multimeter will I be … Yes, there are a few inside. If I test them with a multimeter will I be able to tell if this is the issue?



You would need to know the resistance values
YouDontWantToKnow

You would need to know the resistance values



Yeah, I believe they are written on them. My question would be though even if I find one which is failing is it likely going to be the cause?
Edited by: "joshp" 24th Mar 2016
Okay, actually rather than wasting more time on this I am going to give up also since I can't test the caps while on the board but thanks anyway for the help.
more likely a faulty voltage regulator, and btw, capacitors don't have resistance
mikey_d

capacitors don't have resistance



but you do a resistance test on them
YouDontWantToKnow

but you do a resistance test on them



you can't test the resistance as they don't have any, and they certainly don't have a "resistance value" written on them
mikey_d

you can't test the resistance as they don't have any, and they certainly … you can't test the resistance as they don't have any, and they certainly don't have a "resistance value" written on them



You do an ohms test on them & the value should rise. If no value & it doesnt rise its faulty from my understanding.
Edited by: "YouDontWantToKnow" 24th Mar 2016
YouDontWantToKnow

You do an ohms test on them & the value should rise. If no value & it … You do an ohms test on them & the value should rise. If no value & it doesnt rise its faulty.



Thats not checking resistance, that is just confirming that its not open circuit
mikey_d

Thats not checking resistance, that is just confirming that its not open … Thats not checking resistance, that is just confirming that its not open circuit



It should rise in value, which is more than an open circuit.
YouDontWantToKnow

Thats not checking resistance, that is just confirming that its not open … Thats not checking resistance, that is just confirming that its not open circuit[/quote}It should rise in value, which is more than an open circuit.



that is just telling you that the cap is taking a charge, not reading resistance
mikey_d

that is just telling you that the cap is taking a charge, not reading … that is just telling you that the cap is taking a charge, not reading resistance



But that is how you test them.
YouDontWantToKnow

But that is how you test them.


to test them properly you need a meter with a capacitance reading, measuring on the ohms scale just tells you that its not o/c, it doesn't prove they are working properly
mikey_d

to test them properly you need a meter with a capacitance reading, … to test them properly you need a meter with a capacitance reading, measuring on the ohms scale just tells you that its not o/c, it doesn't prove they are working properly



yep. but we are talking by a multimeter
YouDontWantToKnow

yep. but we are talking by a multimeter


you still aren't measuring resistance...they don't have resistance, you are only using the resistance scale on the meter to check for o/c, what you are seeing is the capacitor charging up
mikey_d

you still aren't measuring resistance...they don't have resistance, you … you still aren't measuring resistance...they don't have resistance, you are only using the resistance scale on the meter to check for o/c, what you are seeing is the capacitor charging up




I gathered that. Thanks for pointing it out but its still a test via resistance settings on a multimeter & that is the way you check it on a multimeter.
To properly test a duff capacitor you need an ESR (equivalent series resistance) meter, the prices have come down and some models are quite cheap. It will tell you if they are drying out and not performing properly without even having to desolder them.
Most of the time you can see the bad ones as they bulge.
liamf12

To properly test a duff capacitor you need an ESR (equivalent series … To properly test a duff capacitor you need an ESR (equivalent series resistance) meter, the prices have come down and some models are quite cheap. It will tell you if they are drying out and not performing properly without even having to desolder them.Most of the time you can see the bad ones as they bulge.



This is what I was trying to say, and also to get across the fact that you cannot measure resistance as they don't have a resistance value, as they are effectively open circuit once they are charged, they only have a reactance value to AC which is inversely proportional to the frequency
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