Hire Car Flat Battery (Whose Cost / Fault? )

8
Posted 1st Oct
Hi,

We are currently in Cyprus and on the 3rd day the hire car wouldn't start (done max 100 miles in it), the electrics were completely gone (key fob wouldn't even work on doors). We rang the hire company and they sent someone out to fix, who kept asking "did you leave your lights on" we know 100% we didn't do this as we have barely used the car, haven't driven in the dark and we sit out on a balcony overlooking the car every night.

He ended up completely changing the battery in the car and left. The hire company haven't said anything about charges, but noticed in the small print it says wear and tear items such as battery failure is a cost to the customer.

I was wanting to know people's stand point on this and if there is any car professions, why would you change the battery if it was just flat? Also if there is any other way it could have gone flat (in case it is our fault)? We had a phone charger in the cigarette lighter (nothing attached), but have never heard of a car battery going flat off that. But other than that it's a bog standard spec Kia Rio.

Just want to get myself ready for the inevitable hand back battle.

PS I have seperate excess insurance cover, although worry this wouldn't fall under that (I should check).
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8 Comments
The mechanic who came out to the old battery away I presume? If he did then it's a 'your word against theirs' situation. If nothing left on, battery should be OK, though (in a hot climate) that depends on the battery being sealed.
Ringfinger01/10/2019 15:26

The mechanic who came out to the old battery away I presume? If he did …The mechanic who came out to the old battery away I presume? If he did then it's a 'your word against theirs' situation. If nothing left on, battery should be OK, though (in a hot climate) that depends on the battery being sealed.


Yeah he took it away with him. Not sure what you mean by sealed? I did see him take it out of a plastic manifold type thing and replace with a new one though. I was Surprised he did it with engine running though.
They will swap out the battery for speed with a fully charged one. I would argue that the alternator is faulty if they tried to charge me and that they are required to provide you with a safe and mechanically sound vehicle. Refuse to sign any additional charges and keep any evidence. If the extra charge is on an invoice you need to settle initial any charges you accept and put an x next to anything you do not accept. Keep copies of the paperwork. When they charge your credit card raise a dispute with your card issuer and they will refund you the extra charges.
Edited by: "cmdr_elito" 1st Oct
cmdr_elito01/10/2019 18:03

They will swap out the battery for speed with a fully charged one. I would …They will swap out the battery for speed with a fully charged one. I would argue that the alternator is faulty if they tried to charge me and that they are required to provide you with a safe and mechanically sound vehicle. Refuse to sign any additional charges and keep any evidence. If the extra charge is on an invoice you need to settle initial any charges you accept and put an x next to anything you do not accept. Keep copies of the paperwork. When they charge your credit card raise a dispute with your card issuer and they will refund you the extra charges.


Cheers for the advice.
feeder1601/10/2019 15:35

Yeah he took it away with him. Not sure what you mean by sealed? I did see …Yeah he took it away with him. Not sure what you mean by sealed? I did see him take it out of a plastic manifold type thing and replace with a new one though. I was Surprised he did it with engine running though.


Sealed? I mean that if it isn't a 'sealed' battery (maintenance free) rather an old fashioned 'top up the battery fluid' type, and it hasn't been sealed or closed properly after filling, the fluid can evaporate to such a degree that it doesn't hold a charge and even cause the battery to totally fail.
The person who came out would swap it rather than try and diagnose the problem as he would get maximum payment for minimum effort.
I would have thought that on all cars these days leaving headlights on a) gives an audible alarm and b) turn themselves off after a short time.
Could be faulty alternator although assuming it's a hire car it would be new-ish.
Edited by: "u664541" 2nd Oct
u66454102/10/2019 08:05

I would have thought that on all cars these days leaving headlights on a) …I would have thought that on all cars these days leaving headlights on a) gives an audible alarm and b) turn themselves off after a short time.Could be faulty alternator although assuming it's a hire car it would be new-ish.


It's got 42,000 on the clock. Hard to judge the age because numberplates aren't same as UK, however, the car has no Bluetooth what so ever (only aux) which to me suggests it's a few years old.
Ringfinger01/10/2019 18:45

Sealed? I mean that if it isn't a 'sealed' battery (maintenance free) …Sealed? I mean that if it isn't a 'sealed' battery (maintenance free) rather an old fashioned 'top up the battery fluid' type, and it hasn't been sealed or closed properly after filling, the fluid can evaporate to such a degree that it doesn't hold a charge and even cause the battery to totally fail. The person who came out would swap it rather than try and diagnose the problem as he would get maximum payment for minimum effort.


Fairly certain it's a sealed battery then.
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