Hong Kong Electricals in UK?

8
Found 4th Aug
Bought a Xiaomi Kettle from Hong Kong with the same plug as the UK, but only noticed after taking out the product the differences in voltages.

It’s rated for 220v at 50hz, whereas UK products are for 230v at 50hz if I remember correctly. Will this cause any issues? With it being a kettle and it most likely going to be on standby keeping warm most of the time, will the difference in voltages be an issue? Otherwise would there be any way around this?

Not too clued up with electricals, so any help would be much appreciated!
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8 Comments
It’ll be fine the U.K. voltage is now 230v but can be 6% below or 10% high so the kettle will work fine.
Dannyrobbo2 h, 39 m ago

It’ll be fine the U.K. voltage is now 230v but can be 6% below or 10% high …It’ll be fine the U.K. voltage is now 230v but can be 6% below or 10% high so the kettle will work fine.


Perfect, just what I wanted to hear! Thanks
It will be fine. And yes that includes the fancy electronics as well as the heat element
Edited by: "mas99" 4th Aug
Being pedantic about the answers above, saying the UK voltage can be +/- a percentage isn't saying anything about the kettle itself - except that all products have to cope with a variation in mains in their country.

In fact the answer above is saying the kettle needs to be safe at 230V +10%, whereas it's rated at 220V nominal.
Edited by: "jwsg" 4th Aug
Average UK mains supply voltage to homes still is 240 volt RMS (although voltage as high as 254V is within specification), the power companies didn't crank the voltage down when the rating was nominally changed to 230V.

It is appliances that are now required to be rated to work at a nominal 230v +10% -6%, so that they can be used both on the UK 240V supply and the EU's 220V.


So you could safely use a UK appliance in Hong Kong, but the reverse may not be true.


Also, Chinese appliances often omit important safety features like thermal fuses, used to prevent fire if they develop a fault.
Edited by: "melted" 4th Aug
jwsg2 h, 13 m ago

Being pedantic about the answers above, saying the UK voltage can be +/- a …Being pedantic about the answers above, saying the UK voltage can be +/- a percentage isn't saying anything about the kettle itself - except that all products have to cope with a variation in mains in their country. In fact the answer above is saying the kettle needs to be safe at 230V +10%, whereas it's rated at 220V nominal.


Agreed, however you're talking about a minor variation in voltage around 220 - 240 which is the historic range of voltages for uk/european mains. It isnt as if you're mixing 110V or 400V
Remember that HK has a colonial heritage and its electricity standards are based on the UK's. You get minor variation anyway just depending on national generation and local infrastructure.

Then think about the application.
This kettle has some sort of built in power adapter to provide power to the wireless/cpu etc which will be at 5v/12v DC. All the chips/transformers etc to do this are easily capable of handling 240v ac or 220v ac. You might get a tiny bit more heat produced which isnt exactly an issue in a kettle.

The heating element will probably run at mains voltage and again is not going to suffer from being at a slightly higher voltage.
I think 'melted' above has understood the point.

It's not about whether it might work or whether you'd be happy to take the risk, it's about being careful giving out advice to others (on a deals website for that matter)

The original reply suggested that because UK mains lower limit is similar to HK mains a HK appliance is OK to use on UK mains. In fact as it's not rated for UK mains, and OP didn't say whether it's CE marked, therefore its simply wrong to suggest it's OK without proper investigation.
jwsg7 h, 25 m ago

Being pedantic about the answers above, saying the UK voltage can be +/- a …Being pedantic about the answers above, saying the UK voltage can be +/- a percentage isn't saying anything about the kettle itself - except that all products have to cope with a variation in mains in their country. In fact the answer above is saying the kettle needs to be safe at 230V +10%, whereas it's rated at 220V nominal.



You think the voltage out the wall in HK is 220v flat, at the end of the day it’s a resistive element, it would operate at about 150 Watts extra and draw about 0.3A more. Given that HK typically would run the same voltage tolerances there’s little risk.

It’s a kettle I’d be more worried about the whole water/electricity mix dangers than an irrelevant voltage differential of 10.
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