Hoover washing machine - not impressed!

35
Found 17th JanEdited by:"Bishbash"
Sick of being ripped off and it happend to my brother.

He bought Hoover washing machine 14 months ago and then it stopped working. He didn't get insurance because the cost of machine (nearly £300) was more than he had budgeted.

He called Hoover for help in mending the machine. They charged him nearly £130 for labour (apparently the parts were "insured"). My brother works six days a week and uses the machine on his one day off. I was fuming when he told me what happened, so I phoned and spoke to a manager at Hoover who refused to acknowledge the fact that despite minimal use, the washing machine should not have need repair in such a short time. Cheekily, now that the washing machine is in working order, she offered an extended warranty for £60. I said that would be my brother's decision and ended the call. It is so vexing that my brother spent £430 on a machine that he has only used 60 times and therefore, so far, costed him £7 for each wash!

It is not right that an established brand name like Hoover should sell machines and still expect customers to fork out more money for insurance in case of breakdowns. I appreciate that it maybe just bad luck that it happened to my brother but I wonder how many people have had to deal with their machines not working within a couple of years, and still have to find money to make repairs.
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36853994-qVHOM.jpg
Bought this in 1896 second hand. Used daily and never let me down.
35 Comments
You have to be really careful what brands you buy these days, there was something on the news the other day about a new law I think it was in the U.S forcing manufacturers to make their goods last longer (like they used to) and be more repair friendly.
Buy cheapo and fingers crossed. Most don't need all the programs and better build especially us men. Lol.. Repair costs are high but didn't you get a 3 month warranty with the repair anyway? £100 plus vat is minimum call out now. I don't think extended warranties are worth the money when new machine can be bought so cheap. Better machines which get more use then yeah,buy a warrenty..
I bought a Hoover dynamic and it lasted 14 months.
The drum broke and a fixer said it costs too much. Sold it on eBay and the guy said it would cost me £60 but i had already ordered a new one.
Never buy a hoover
wayners21 m ago

Most don't need all the programs



This we probably only use 3 of the programmes on our machine, we use the temperature options more than the programmes available.
Just looked at some new washing machines and it's been a while but didn't they all come with 5 years warranty? It seems it's gone down to 1 or 2 now


Edit: btw I had a hoover and yes it was 5 years warranty because mine broke after the 5 years and paid to insure it and got t fixed for £180 or something can't remember.
Edited by: "MR1123" 17th Jan
Sadly this is so common, cheap machines are expensive even with parts warranty. The real price for a full 5 year warranted Hoover is actually £820 compare this with an expensive machine like a Samsung for £350 or even the top of the range Samsung which normally costs £850 and your budget brand Hoover is expensive. Samsung more often come with 5 year warranty.

All the cheap brands do this Hotpoint even give a 10 year warranty of course it’s parts only and on top the machines are poor quality.
Buy a Beko or Miele, depending on your budget.

Beko has cheap repair costs, Miele will last a long time and both are easily repairable.

(Bosch has tricky closed units if they go wrong.)
Yes, buy a Beko. I've been burned by to many expensive Bosch and LG machines.
Buy cheap buy twice as they say. Hoover is not a quality brand. I paid about £450 for a Samsung with a five year guarantee which is the cost of a hoover and a repair.
I had a similar situation a long time ago with Grundfos. I bought an item advertised for properties with 4 to 5 occupants. At the time I was living on my own and after a 14 months the PCB failed. I was quoted an extortionate call out fee with a minimum charge that was even more ridiculous. I eventually got them to replace the PCB free of charge going down route that the usage I had after 14 months was the equivalent to a family of 4 having same issue after 3-4 months.

Perhaps you could help your brother get the extended warranty for nothing if Hoover play ball. It would seem like a reasonable solution.
Edited by: "OllieSt" 17th Jan
Unfortunately, white goods these days are effectively consumables - mass produced and built as cheaply as possible. I used to buy premium, but the last fridge and washer I bought, I decided this was now a false economy. The thing is, don't treat your white goods like precious items to be repaired and passed down the generations - a £300 washer is cheap as chips and more cost effective to scrap than repair unless you're doing it yourself. Why would you spend nearly 50% of an items original purchase price to repair something now a year old and out of warranty?
fivegoldstars7 m ago

Unfortunately, white goods these days are effectively consumables - mass …Unfortunately, white goods these days are effectively consumables - mass produced and built as cheaply as possible. I used to buy premium, but the last fridge and washer I bought, I decided this was now a false economy. The thing is, don't treat your white goods like precious items to be repaired and passed down the generations - a £300 washer is cheap as chips and more cost effective to scrap than repair unless you're doing it yourself. Why would you spend nearly 50% of an items original purchase price to repair something now a year old and out of warranty?



£300 is not cheap to everybody.
fanpages14 m ago

£300 is not cheap to everybody.


No, but £300 is cheap in terms of a) currently available washing machines and b) the historic price of white goods. Twenty years ago, I bought a Matsui TV for £325, an Indesit washer for £350 and fridge freezer for about £400. I could buy cheaper today which, factoring in inflation seems crazy. As consumers, we've helped drive prices down but we have to accept the pay off, which is that things are not built as well as they were - white goods are consumable items now.
fivegoldstars1 m ago

No, but £300 is cheap in terms of a) currently available washing machines …No, but £300 is cheap in terms of a) currently available washing machines and b) the historic price of white goods. Twenty years ago, I bought a Matsui TV for £325, an Indesit washer for £350 and fridge freezer for about £400. I could buy cheaper today which, factoring in inflation seems crazy. As consumers, we've helped drive prices down but we have to accept the pay off, which is that things are not built as well as they were - white goods are consumable items now.


It does require people to search too for good value for money. That took me 30 secs to find.
Bought a Samsung ECO Bubble 6 years ago, also bought a full extended warranty for 5 years of that, and guess what.. never had an issue but you can bet if I didn't insure it I would of

Still regardless I always buy extended warranties I think its better to throw away £60.00 today than need to pay £150+ in 2 years. after the warranty runs out I dont extend, usually at that time I will start to prepare to buy a new one shoudl I have too.
Edited by: "MrSprkle" 17th Jan
Bought a Blomberg washing machine last June which has a five year parts AND labour guarantee.
Bought hotpoint washing machine from comet...worked well for 9 years, last year its fixer broken...
I have a hotpoint, over 2 years now and no issues.
Due to price I don’t buy extended warranty’s, instead I put £20.00 a month into a savings account to cover replacements.
ie fridge freezer washing machine etc etc.
Re beko, I have a dishwasher or theirs that’s 6\7 years old and has never missed a beat yet.
As I had a warranty on it when it was 4.5 years old I claimed on it for mainly cosmetic reasons.
The top had a small crack due to heat, draws were losing tips and were going a bit rusty new wheels and a cutlery tray.
parts cost more than what a new dishwasher would.
It was all cosmetic, the dishwasher worked perfectly.
I just claimed to get warranty money back as such.
Having see the news about bekos catching fire etc, well 5 years ago it was whirlpool and Hoover doing the same.
Waher dryers eating clothes \ ripping the to bits.
All makes have issues with reliability some last a year others last over 20 years like my old Bosch washing machine.
The only thing that went wrong was the door lock, cost £25.00 delivered from the net and 30 mins to fix my self.
I gave it to my friend and it’s still working today so it’s 21 this year.
36853994-qVHOM.jpg
Bought this in 1896 second hand. Used daily and never let me down.
fivegoldstars17 h, 36 m ago

Unfortunately, white goods these days are effectively consumables - mass …Unfortunately, white goods these days are effectively consumables - mass produced and built as cheaply as possible. I used to buy premium, but the last fridge and washer I bought, I decided this was now a false economy. The thing is, don't treat your white goods like precious items to be repaired and passed down the generations - a £300 washer is cheap as chips and more cost effective to scrap than repair unless you're doing it yourself. Why would you spend nearly 50% of an items original purchase price to repair something now a year old and out of warranty?



fanpages17 h, 29 m ago

£300 is not cheap to everybody.



fivegoldstars17 h, 14 m ago

No, but £300 is cheap in terms of a) currently available washing machines …No, but £300 is cheap in terms of a) currently available washing machines and b) the historic price of white goods. Twenty years ago, I bought a Matsui TV for £325, an Indesit washer for £350 and fridge freezer for about £400. I could buy cheaper today which, factoring in inflation seems crazy. As consumers, we've helped drive prices down but we have to accept the pay off, which is that things are not built as well as they were - white goods are consumable items now.



Look at other consumer goods, like the categories you mentioned; audio-visual entertainment, storage of chilled & frozen food, & any white goods with mechanical components that are controlled by electronic circuit boards.

These will decrease over time if no advances are made in functionality, & the cost of core components reduce.

Of course more expensive examples are introduced by manufacturers with new features, & improvements to existing functions, but if you buy new products that match the service provided by older products, of course they will be cheaper as time goes by.

Technological advances in the service provided by consumer goods or, rather, the research into these advances, are met by the consumer when the newer products hit the marker, but existing products cost less to make as similar advances are made in the automation of construction.

If products with the same features as previous years never dropped in price, the manufacturers would never be able to introduce new models & product lines (with higher retail prices).

Why does this surprise you?
fanpages4 h, 29 m ago

Look at other consumer goods, like the categories you mentioned; …Look at other consumer goods, like the categories you mentioned; audio-visual entertainment, storage of chilled & frozen food, & any white goods with mechanical components that are controlled by electronic circuit boards.These will decrease over time if no advances are made in functionality, & the cost of core components reduce.Of course more expensive examples are introduced by manufacturers with new features, & improvements to existing functions, but if you buy new products that match the service provided by older products, of course they will be cheaper as time goes by.Technological advances in the service provided by consumer goods or, rather, the research into these advances, are met by the consumer when the newer products hit the marker, but existing products cost less to make as similar advances are made in the automation of construction.If products with the same features as previous years never dropped in price, the manufacturers would never be able to introduce new models & product lines (with higher retail prices).Why does this surprise you?


The cumulative CPI inflation rate from 2000 is 60%. Since this time, my Council Tax has increased 100% - it's still the same tax. My utilities have increased 100% - it's still the same gas, electric and water. Food, fuel...you get my point. During this time, labour costs have risen, and with it production and other factors such as transportation. However, the general price of white goods - comparing like for like price range point - has actually decreased.
Yes, despite automation etc, this does surprise me when I compare it with price increases across all other consumer goods. I agree with what you're saying when comparing the same model over say a three to five year period, but I don't feel that you can stretch that to different, entry level models twenty years apart. You can't get prices to, effectively, drop that much with automation and R&D savings alone. You do it by reducing build quality, making cost savings by using cheaper, less reliable components and, as I said, turning white goods into consumable items.
Edited by: "fivegoldstars" 18th Jan
OP brother went about it the wrong way.
14months use of a washing machine is not long enough, he should have told them it has not lasted a 'Reasonable ' amount of time and threaten them with the small claims court.
fivegoldstars13 h, 50 m ago

The cumulative CPI inflation rate from 2000 is 60%. Since this time, my …The cumulative CPI inflation rate from 2000 is 60%. Since this time, my Council Tax has increased 100% - it's still the same tax. My utilities have increased 100% - it's still the same gas, electric and water. Food, fuel...you get my point. During this time, labour costs have risen, and with it production and other factors such as transportation. However, the general price of white goods - comparing like for like price range point - has actually decreased. Yes, despite automation etc, this does surprise me when I compare it with price increases across all other consumer goods. I agree with what you're saying when comparing the same model over say a three to five year period, but I don't feel that you can stretch that to different, entry level models twenty years apart. You can't get prices to, effectively, drop that much with automation and R&D savings alone. You do it by reducing build quality, making cost savings by using cheaper, less reliable components and, as I said, turning white goods into consumable items.


Are Machines Too Cheap? - We explain why we think that washing machines are stunningly cheap these days
OllieSt40 m ago

Miele washing machine with 2 warranty @ £545A further 8 year warranty @ …Miele washing machine with 2 warranty @ £545A further 8 year warranty @ £279 (I don't know of other manufacturers that allow up to 10 year [2 +8] extended warranty)That equates to a washing machine costing £6.87 per month for 120 month period fully covered for parts and warranty.



...and this is where the premium vs cheap debate becomes a bit blurred. With most goods and services, there's a general consensus that you buy the best you can and it works out most cost effective. But, if you treat a washer as a consumable, might you be better off buying say, this comparable model for £169 and, with the magic pricing of washers, potentially be able to replace it 4 times over the 10 years, with 5 of those covered by warranty? Not only is it very unlikely that you'd hit 5 washers with such a poor lifespan, by the third one you'd probably have energy/efficiency savings and features which would put your Miele to shame.
That's even before you consider the fact that washers aren't affected by inflation, so your fifth one will probably cost about an hour's wage
Edited by: "fivegoldstars" 19th Jan
fivegoldstars20 m ago

...and this is where the premium vs cheap debate becomes a bit blurred. …...and this is where the premium vs cheap debate becomes a bit blurred. With most goods and services, there's a general consensus that you buy the best you can and it works out most cost effective. But, if you treat a washer as a consumable, might you be better off buying say, this comparable model for £169 and, with the magic pricing of washers, potentially be able to replace it 4 times over the 10 years, with 5 of those covered by warranty? Not only is it very unlikely that you'd hit 5 washers with such a poor lifespan, by the third one you'd probably have energy/efficiency savings and features which would put your Miele to shame.That's even before you consider the fact that washers aren't affected by inflation, so your fifth one will probably cost about an hour's wage


Yes the whole point of the discussion. I think it is reasonable to assume that the Miele might actually wash your clothes better though. And nobody actually want to exercise a warranty if they can help it. It would be painful sitting in a laundrette. The question is what is the likelyhood of a more expensive machine breaking down by comparison to the cheaper one doing the same thing within 12 months.
Edited by: "OllieSt" 19th Jan
OllieSt20 m ago

Yes the whole point of the discussion. I think it is reasonable to assume …Yes the whole point of the discussion. I think it is reasonable to assume that the Miele might actually wash your clothes better though. And nobody actually want to exercise a warranty if they can help it. It would be painful sitting in a laundrette. The question is what is the likelyhood of a more expensive machine breaking down by comparison to the cheaper one doing the same thing within 12 months.


It's tricky. Personally, I've just come to accept that nothing lasts, and that's not necessarily a bad thing anymore. If you follow that line of thinking, then you're not going to be chasing up warranties or sorting repairs - if a £169 washer fails after a year, take it on the chin and have a new one delivered and installed the very next day. The problem comes when, like the OP, you buy cheap and cheerful, but expect it to last like the one your parents had for twenty years.
fivegoldstars13 m ago

It's tricky. Personally, I've just come to accept that nothing lasts, and …It's tricky. Personally, I've just come to accept that nothing lasts, and that's not necessarily a bad thing anymore. If you follow that line of thinking, then you're not going to be chasing up warranties or sorting repairs - if a £169 washer fails after a year, take it on the chin and have a new one delivered and installed the very next day. The problem comes when, like the OP, you buy cheap and cheerful, but expect it to last like the one your parents had for twenty years.


But using your thinking, why would you object to this? It makes sense financially and the chances are your clothes will be cleaned better. What happens after the warranty runs out is hard to evaluate on either machine.
Edited by: "OllieSt" 19th Jan
OllieSt24 m ago

But using your thinking, why would you object to this? It makes sense …But using your thinking, why would you object to this? It makes sense financially and the chances are your clothes will be cleaned better. What happens after the warranty runs out is hard to evaluate on either machine.


I certainly wouldn't object to that - it looks a cracking deal to be fair. Thing is, it's a step between your Miele and my Bush. What's best, one Miele, two Samsung or four Bush in your ten year period? Like I said, it's tricky, but all of those options are probably better than paying a premium for a disposable brand with a small warranty like £350 for a Hoover.
fivegoldstars16 m ago

I certainly wouldn't object to that - it looks a cracking deal to be fair. …I certainly wouldn't object to that - it looks a cracking deal to be fair. Thing is, it's a step between your Miele and my Bush. What's best, one Miele, two Samsung or four Bush in your ten year period? Like I said, it's tricky, but all of those options are probably better than paying a premium for a disposable brand with a small warranty like £350 for a Hoover.


Absolutelty.

For me I had a made in West Germany (yeah that's right, not Germany) AEG that lasted over 20 years. I replaced it with a Siemens that had a 5 year warranty about 9 years ago. I have never had a washing machine breakdown (the AEG door lock failed eventually)

kiss of death post


EDIT: If my memory serves me, and that is starting not to be the case, I am 100% sure I paid more for my AEG than my Siemens which was the point to your original post.

Enough about washing machines for me.
Edited by: "OllieSt" 19th Jan
ScubaDudes22 h, 8 m ago

[Image] Bought this in 1896 second hand. Used daily and never let me down.



Time travel ?
fivegoldstars4 h, 52 m ago

...and this is where the premium vs cheap debate becomes a bit blurred. …...and this is where the premium vs cheap debate becomes a bit blurred. With most goods and services, there's a general consensus that you buy the best you can and it works out most cost effective. But, if you treat a washer as a consumable, might you be better off buying say, this comparable model for £169 and, with the magic pricing of washers, potentially be able to replace it 4 times over the 10 years, with 5 of those covered by warranty? Not only is it very unlikely that you'd hit 5 washers with such a poor lifespan, by the third one you'd probably have energy/efficiency savings and features which would put your Miele to shame.That's even before you consider the fact that washers aren't affected by inflation, so your fifth one will probably cost about an hour's wage



After 8-10 years it is unlikely that the same model will be available to buy with, or without, a manufacturer's warranty as, if, as you suggest, such products are to be treated as consumables, the manufacturer will have replaced the cheaper model with another because it is not cost-effective to keep replacing via warranty claims.
Sometimes it's just luck of the drawer. Doesn't matter what brand you buy. The outlaws replaced their 15 year old Miele washing machine with another Mile. nearly a grand and it started showing faults from day one. After several repairs and a load of phone calls they got their money back and got a John Lewis machine which theyre well happy with. Ive had my JL machine for 9 years and its never missed a beat. but its looking a bit tatty so i may invest in a new one next year.suppose its about what you can afford and try and work out the price of a machine per year of service. if a machine costs you £150 but you only get 3 years out of it i supposes its less than paying 1k for a Miele that lasts 10 years. just dont be conned into extended warranties, like someone has already mentioned just put s little aside each month to cover your white good if they need replacing
OllieSt4 h, 16 m ago

But using your thinking, why would you object to this? It makes sense …But using your thinking, why would you object to this? It makes sense financially and the chances are your clothes will be cleaned better. What happens after the warranty runs out is hard to evaluate on either machine.



It is also impossible to say that one machine will wash clothes better than another even if you bought both simultaneously & ran both side-by-side, as you would never have an identically-soiled set of clothes to wash in both machines, or be able to wash in exactly the same conditions (same water, same detergent, & so on).

However, you can compare the specifications of two machines &, on the balance of probability, estimate that a particular machine is likely to perform better given experience recorded with models/components from the same manufacturer & using the water supply in your area.

Summary: Buy what you can afford, with the specifications you require, & avoid Hoover models.
Does that mean it sucks??
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