Housing association asking why I want to leave end end my tenancy, do I have to tell them?

17
Found 26th Mar
Hello

I am in plans of sending off written notice to end my tenancy agreement. However, my housing association's tenancy agreement pack states:

"



We
will ask you some questions about
why you have decided to leave."

Would it be sufficient to say I am moving elsewhere, that is private living, rather than social, or would they start to ask me more questions?

Our home is in excellent condition, very clean etc, no problems with it at all. However, this concerns me and I am not sure if they'll be funny about it?

I know people tend to look down on social housed people. But we no longer need it as we are getting our own place.

Thanks for your advice
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17 Comments
There is no risk in explaining why.

I'd ask any tenant why they didn't want to stay, in case it was something which might deter future tenants.
Its probably just part of there improvement program, but at the end of the day its up to you whether you want to participate or say anything to them at all.
First things first. You clearly have a copy of the tenancy agreement so a good move would be to double check your rights to end the agreement. You probably have already by the sound of it.

If you are leaving without giving the proper notice stated in the contract then your reasons may help them decide whether they wish to press you for the balance of the rent due or due in lieu of notice. They have made a commitment to you which prevents them shopping around for another tenant so they may not have your rent payment coming in but they will still have loan repayments to honour. They will also incur genuine costs in re-letting.

If you are complying with the obligations in the agreement to give notice then they can ask but you are not obligated to answer. But it may well help the landlord to answer their questions and as this is a Housing Association, they are a landlord looking to help others to get on the ladder and they have an opportunity to fix problems between lets that isn't available during a let without a lot of hasle.
ccnp15 m ago

First things first. You clearly have a copy of the tenancy agreement so a …First things first. You clearly have a copy of the tenancy agreement so a good move would be to double check your rights to end the agreement. You probably have already by the sound of it.If you are leaving without giving the proper notice stated in the contract then your reasons may help them decide whether they wish to press you for the balance of the rent due or due in lieu of notice. They have made a commitment to you which prevents them shopping around for another tenant so they may not have your rent payment coming in but they will still have loan repayments to honour. They will also incur genuine costs in re-letting. If you are complying with the obligations in the agreement to give notice then they can ask but you are not obligated to answer. But it may well help the landlord to answer their questions and as this is a Housing Association, they are a landlord looking to help others to get on the ladder and they have an opportunity to fix problems between lets that isn't available during a let without a lot of hasle.


Hi

Following all their rules. Rules are four weeks from notice which includes the rent for those four weeks. Property left in good condition, clean, nothing broken and returned as provided (carpet and any additional fixtures removed)

This is all fine. Just worried about the point then asking why I’m leaving.

I’m simply leaving because we’re going to get a place of our own. Would that be sufficient?
Or just say ‘Due to a change in my personal circumstances, I no longer need the property’.
As previous posters have said, they probably want to know a reason so that they can improve their services and properties. If everyone wrote down due to damp, mould, lack of heating, boiler failures, noise pollution, anti-social behaviour etc..... that would give them a clearer picture to resolve issues.
WestMidlands1 h, 6 m ago

HiFollowing all their rules. Rules are four weeks from notice which …HiFollowing all their rules. Rules are four weeks from notice which includes the rent for those four weeks. Property left in good condition, clean, nothing broken and returned as provided (carpet and any additional fixtures removed)This is all fine. Just worried about the point then asking why I’m leaving.I’m simply leaving because we’re going to get a place of our own. Would that be sufficient?


Is just another pointless survey. Much like when you phone your mobile phone company to complain about something.... They always ask if you will complete a 'short customer assistance survey'. It's just for their records, so they can show accountability and due diligence. It's not a trick question and as long as you have complied with terms of content you have nothing to fear.
Toptrumpet7 m ago

Or just say ‘Due to a change in my personal circumstances, I no longer n …Or just say ‘Due to a change in my personal circumstances, I no longer need the property’. As previous posters have said, they probably want to know a reason so that they can improve their services and properties. If everyone wrote down due to damp, mould, lack of heating, boiler failures, noise pollution, anti-social behaviour etc..... that would give them a clearer picture to resolve issues.



Can't see a problem as you have followed the contract. You could always answer by explaining it isn't noise, neighbours, charges, parking etc problems etc.

Had a further think about this and concluded its probably to do with the modern approach to 'see and be seen' to be doing your job. It's not enough to say 'we have no complaints' or 'no one told me'. They need to ask if there is anything they need to be aware of. If they have been good landlords, you should not b afraid of helping them
they are just going to record answers for their survey as to why someone would want to move out of cheap accommodation. it is probably more for the government who subsidise housing associations that they have to ask this.
We used to live in similar housing a few years ago, similar to what @ccnp mentioned, it may be to find out if you have had any issues whilst living there. People may want to move because of noise / bad area, fall out with a neighbour but never reported it. Don't think they will question you further if you just want to move to a private rented property.
WestMidlands4 h, 46 m ago

HiFollowing all their rules. Rules are four weeks from notice which …HiFollowing all their rules. Rules are four weeks from notice which includes the rent for those four weeks. Property left in good condition, clean, nothing broken and returned as provided (carpet and any additional fixtures removed)This is all fine. Just worried about the point then asking why I’m leaving.I’m simply leaving because we’re going to get a place of our own. Would that be sufficient?


Yes that would be fine as long as u give the 4 weeks notice etc. That reason is well probably the best why would you carry on living there if you have your own place. Just make sure you definitely have the place in time to move .
Dude, they aren't your school head teacher and are gonna spank you if they don't like your answer.

It's standard to ask why, so they can tick a box and move onto the next tenant.
mutley110 h, 49 m ago

they are just going to record answers for their survey as to why someone …they are just going to record answers for their survey as to why someone would want to move out of cheap accommodation. it is probably more for the government who subsidise housing associations that they have to ask this.



How on earth do you deduce that the OP is currently in 'cheap accommodation'...
andynicol35 m ago

How on earth do you deduce that the OP is currently in 'cheap …How on earth do you deduce that the OP is currently in 'cheap accommodation'...


housing association charge cheaper rents than the private sector. i mean 'cheaper' than the private sector. my dad lives in a housing association property and the rent is less than 50% of the private sector.
mutley139 m ago

housing association charge cheaper rents than the private sector. i mean …housing association charge cheaper rents than the private sector. i mean 'cheaper' than the private sector. my dad lives in a housing association property and the rent is less than 50% of the private sector.



Doesn’t mean the OP is paying less than the average for his area, there’s no basis for your deduction and IMO is demeaning towards the OP.
andynicol32 m ago

Doesn’t mean the OP is paying less than the average for his area, there’s n …Doesn’t mean the OP is paying less than the average for his area, there’s no basis for your deduction and IMO is demeaning towards the OP.



theguardian.com/hou…ing
andynicol6 h, 1 m ago

Doesn’t mean the OP is paying less than the average for his area, there’s n …Doesn’t mean the OP is paying less than the average for his area, there’s no basis for your deduction and IMO is demeaning towards the OP.


It’s fine mate. This is the internet.
mutley118 h, 55 m ago

https://www.theguardian.com/housing-network/2014/feb/03/affordable-housing-meaning-rent-social-housing



Theres nothing in there that could help you come to the conclusion that the OP is currently in 'cheap accommodation'.
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