How can I post a couple of lithium ion batteries within the Uk?

Posted 20th Aug 2015
I have a couple of camera batteries that i was going to list on Ebay, they are new, unused lithium 1900mah (13.7wh each). It occurred to me today though that the Royal Mail no longer allow the shipping of batteries on their own. I have checked the prohibited item list for my 'go to' courier firm (Parcel2Go) and they won't accept them either.
So, do I need to bundle them together with some random electrical item? Can anybody tell me how one can post a couple of batteries anymore? Thanks in advance for any advice, it is much appreciated.
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  1. Avatar
    Don't tell them. The rules are ridiculous. For example you can't send a phone battery on its own but its OK to send if its accompanied with a phone, inserted or not.

    Some staff will ask, just lie and some won't ask so don't say anything.
    Avatar
    Anonymous User
    Royal Mail check parcels and actually open up parcels if they think it’s suspicious
  2. Avatar
    Anonymous User
    If you are in UK none of the courier firms (include DHL) or the Post Office will accept Li-on batteries without the device they are intended for being the parcel. In my case though I got lucky. The two new batteries which I was returning to Amazon were sent to me in error. My first attempt to pay was 'unsuccessful'. My default bank card in my Amazon wallet had been cancelled a week before because I found it was being used by some fraudster. I then tried to place my order again using my new bank card details for the same account. Without me being told, Amazon then re-presented my first order and it went through. I then received my order twice and was charged twice!! I applied to return the batteries, got a returns slip and a battery warning sticker for the box but the Post Office refused it. I tried all the big couriers and got nowhere. I then called Amazon and suggested they collect the parcel from me and deliver back to Dunfermline for free rather than reimburse me for the courier costs I would have paid if I could have found anyone. Advisor disappeared for a while and then said that they would action my refund of £51, and I could keep the batteries in this instance as I had done everything I could to return them. Result! I think the lesson is that the only answer (assuming hand delivering is not possible) is to ask the supplier to sort it out unless they specifically tell you at the time of ordering that you can't return the goods. And by the way another reason not to buy from a foreign supplier! Good Luck, you'll need it...
  3. Avatar
    The reason they won't allow you to post them is that there could be metal staples in reused wrapping or packaging that contains material that will conduct electric which could short batteries and they will explode! Also something could break through your package and short the batteries. It's safer if batteries are fitted in a devise and far less likely to get a short even if the packaging gets damaged. It's annoying I know but there it is. You can lie when posting but any problems could come back to you. I would not send in post. Choice is yours.
  4. Avatar
    I would put them in a box and post as normal. I got a car battery delivered to me by parcelforce...
  5. Avatar
    Anonymous User
    I don't know if this applies but I just got some new batteries from china and they sent random phone casesin each parcel.
  6. Avatar
    I've not had any problems sending batteries through royal mail, I simply said there are batteries inside, they stick a battery inside label on and all done.
  7. Avatar
    Author

    I've not had any problems sending batteries through royal mail, I simply … I've not had any problems sending batteries through royal mail, I simply said there are batteries inside, they stick a battery inside label on and all done



    Were the batteries being shipped inside a device, or with the product that they power? Apparently that is permitted but I was in the Post Office today posting a parcel and they asked me (as they always do) if it contained batteries. It didn't but it prompted me to ask the "what if" question, which is when they told me that I wouldn't be able to send just batteries on their own and I was sent away with their prohibited item pamphlet which supported what they had told me.

    Thanks for the input so far everyone.
  8. Avatar
    Anonymous User
    Mghf

    Were the batteries being shipped inside a device, or with the product … Were the batteries being shipped inside a device, or with the product that they power? Apparently that is permitted but I was in the Post Office today posting a parcel and they asked me (as they always do) if it contained batteries. It didn't but it prompted me to ask the "what if" question, which is when they told me that I wouldn't be able to send just batteries on their own and I was sent away with their prohibited item pamphlet which supported what they had told me.Thanks for the input so far everyone.


    That's strange, I buy batteries all the time on Fleabay and they get delivered by royal mail.
  9. Avatar
    Author

    Don't tell them



    Well I guess that is one approach lol
    (edited)
  10. Avatar
    Author

    You can lie when posting but any problems could come back to you. I would … You can lie when posting but any problems could come back to you. I would not send in post. Choice is yours.



    Thanks for taking the time to answer Wayners and to honest, I don't want to be in a position where I have to lie but I'm obviously not going to buy a camera merely to use it as packaging material for each battery that I want to post, nor am I going to drive the length and breadth of the country in order to hand deliver these batteries. What I am trying to get my head around is that I know that I could log onto Amazon [for example] and purchase at this very moment in time, any one of a million batteries from thousands of different and disparate vendors. I also know that those batteries would be delivered to my door at some time within the course of the next few days. Now I find it incredible that everyone of those merchants could be flouting these regulations so there must be a way of legitimately doing it, all I'd like to know is how...?
  11. Avatar
    Anonymous User
    I have a friend who sends them all the time there is no way round it they don't allow it full stop all the vendors are breaking the rules all the people sending them from China are too so hey everyone's doing it just pack them safely the problem is the foil wrapped batteries that easily puncher not camera batteries or 18650 if I were I mean my friend were to send a foil wrapped Lipo battery it would be in a sealed hard plastic case inside a box and in a padded package
  12. Avatar
    wayners20th Aug 2015

    The reason they won't allow you to post them is that there could be metal …The reason they won't allow you to post them is that there could be metal staples in reused wrapping or packaging that contains material that will conduct electric which could short batteries and they will explode! Also something could break through your package and short the batteries. It's safer if batteries are fitted in a devise and far less likely to get a short even if the packaging gets damaged. It's annoying I know but there it is. You can lie when posting but any problems could come back to you. I would not send in post. Choice is yours.



    Nice to see a sensible, useful and informative reply.
  13. Avatar
    Anonymous User
    Amazon have a contract with Royal Mail that’s why amazon can send batteries to you but, if you was to send them buying the postage yourself and they find batteries in there they will get destroyed immediately.
    Avatar
    Anonymous User
    It’s true. I called Royal Mail myself and they said if they find batteries they just dispose of them
  14. Avatar
    Anonymous User
    I'm trying to return a shipment from Amazon - it's a powerbank for a Switch with a stand. When I went to the Post Office, they just told me no you can't. It's a power bank you can't ship it with us. When I call Amazon, they said you can. No where on the internet does it say how to actually return this, and which provider to use. I don't want to spend hours looking for a place that will do it, when the Post Office is literally on my way to Uni and 5 min walk from my house. I have a label saying it contains batteries inside, if they can ship it, so should I. I literally used the same box and label that it came with.
  15. Avatar
    Royal Mail scan packages, we just had a battery intercepted by them and disposed of.

    It seems that there is no legitimate way to send a lithium ion battery that isn't contained in the product it powers.
  16. Avatar
    I had same problem with trying to return laptop battery which I purchased from Amazon. Royal Mail refused it and so did most couriers that I enquired of. The only one that accepted it was DHL but it was too inconvenient for me to get to nearest drop off point. There would have been a cost involved but Amazon said they would reimburse me the fee after showing proof of payment. It's unfair that Amazon can send batteries but customers cannot send back without a great deal of work. No warnings on site about any restrictions on return. One of the reasons Amazon is making so much money. The other is warranty on products buts another story for another day.
  17. Avatar
    i have received batteries from ebay sellers and amazon without any issues.
  18. Avatar
    mutley113/05/2019 17:31

    i have received batteries from ebay sellers and amazon without any issues.


    Lithium Ion?
  19. Avatar
    deleted217140930/01/2019 00:36

    I'm trying to return a shipment from Amazon - it's a powerbank for a …I'm trying to return a shipment from Amazon - it's a powerbank for a Switch with a stand. When I went to the Post Office, they just told me no you can't. It's a power bank you can't ship it with us. When I call Amazon, they said you can. No where on the internet does it say how to actually return this, and which provider to use. I don't want to spend hours looking for a place that will do it, when the Post Office is literally on my way to Uni and 5 min walk from my house. I have a label saying it contains batteries inside, if they can ship it, so should I. I literally used the same box and label that it came with.


    Hey,
    How did you get round this in the end? I'm having the exact same issue.
  20. Avatar
    Nakupops01/07/2019 13:23

    Hey,How did you get round this in the end? I'm having the exact same issue.


    Yup - me three!
    The only place Ive seen it not listed as an outright restricted item, is with eBay's shutl service - support.shutl.com/hc/…ms- whilst this isnt useful for normal post, its worthwhile as a note of reference.
  21. Avatar
    I have a similar problem . I want to send back a lithium battery as used on my Trike, but I can,t no one will take it from the isles of scilly, One can be sent to me but I can,t send one back. The place it has to go is Bristol. I was told if I send the Trike back with the battery on it then it,s ok. A new battery is nearly £500. Sending the Trike back is out of the question from here.
  22. Avatar
    I contacted Amazon and they gave me a list of 4 couriers that will accept Lithium batteries.

    ArrowXL
    DPD
    UPS
    Jersey Post
  23. Avatar
    Scratch that - looking into the terms of 3 of the 4 all restrict Lithium batteries unless contained in a device.
    On live chat with amazon now - asking them to arrange collection as no other way around this
  24. Avatar
    Hassled them for long enough that they gave me a full refund and said i could keep the item or dispose of it myself
  25. Avatar
    I was also able to get a full refund from Amazon for the same reason. I simply told them the truth that no courier accepts stand alone lithium iron batteries. They suggested I donate or dispose of the item.
  26. Avatar
    Found this old thread with the same problem (returning new unused laptop battery).

    I spoke to Amazon (online chat) and they gave me the same list of couriers as above. I linked them to the DHL prohibited items list which includes batteries, at which point they just refunded the whole order (seems excessive but who am I to argue?)

    I did subsequently find out that UPS don't seem to list batteries as prohibited, if that helps.
  27. Avatar
    hollymcr07/01/2021 18:55

    Found this old thread with the same problem (returning new unused laptop …Found this old thread with the same problem (returning new unused laptop battery).I spoke to Amazon (online chat) and they gave me the same list of couriers as above. I linked them to the DHL prohibited items list which includes batteries, at which point they just refunded the whole order (seems excessive but who am I to argue?)I did subsequently find out that UPS don't seem to list batteries as prohibited, if that helps.


    I went through all this, then Amazon told me tp keep the product and issued me a refund
  28. Avatar
    I received a refund for lithium batteries I had wanted to return too. Thanks op.
  29. Avatar
    hollymcr07/01/2021 18:55

    Found this old thread with the same problem (returning new unused laptop …Found this old thread with the same problem (returning new unused laptop battery).I spoke to Amazon (online chat) and they gave me the same list of couriers as above. I linked them to the DHL prohibited items list which includes batteries, at which point they just refunded the whole order (seems excessive but who am I to argue?)I did subsequently find out that UPS don't seem to list batteries as prohibited, if that helps.


    Yes, UPS allows shipping lithium ion batteries. When booking a shipment with them you can even tick a box "includes lithium batteries" and it automatically prints the hazard label for it.
  30. Avatar
    gambiting13/01/2021 11:39

    Yes, UPS allows shipping lithium ion batteries. When booking a shipment …Yes, UPS allows shipping lithium ion batteries. When booking a shipment with them you can even tick a box "includes lithium batteries" and it automatically prints the hazard label for it.



    Just went with the same process as all of you: Amazon delivers lithium battery, I ask for a refund, there is no courrier accepting that, so Amazon has refunded me.
    The Amazon helper did point me to UPS. And it almost worked ! Indeed, as said just before, there is a tick box "includes lithium batteries" in their shipment booking. But later in the process, there is also a "what are you shipping?" box and if you enter "lithium" it straights up tells you "The description listed contains a prohibited item. Please remove the item from the shipment and refer to the list of prohibited items for additional information".

    So UPS is like all other carriers it seems: they accept to send shipments containing lithium batteries, like phones or laptops, but not shipments that ARE solely lithium batteries.
    Avatar
    Anonymous User
    No courier accepts lithium ion batteries on their own. Every courier only accepts ones that are sent with or as part of a larger electronic device.
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