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How to find all FREE Amazon Kindle Books

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Posted 14th Aug 2019
I've seen a number of deals in the freebies section listing free books, so I thought I would write some information on how to find all free books listed on Amazon and also explain a little how to search for specific free books.

Firstly, here is a link to what should be all free books currently on amazon.co.uk:
amazon.co.uk/s?i…A-0

NOTE: This does not remove some "sponsored" results, Amazon may still list some paid for advertisers.

From this page, you should be able to click on any of the sections in the left hand column to narrow down your results. For example, click on a department to narrow your results to a specific genre, then click on a star rating to further narrow results.

This is fine for most users, so you can stop just there if you want.

Want to get more technical and find specific free books?
Amazon uses what is known as a parameterised URL to direct people to results. A parameterised URL means that the part after amazon.co.uk in your browser bar is used to compose a list of search options (parameters). So in finding which books are free (and which books are kindle books), we have added to the amazon.co.uk url these search parameters:

/s?i=digital-text&rh=n%3A341689031%2Cp_36%3A-0

You don't need to understand this url or even be able to read it. However, if you want to search for a specific subject/author/etc then you can edit this search to add a search option.

Want to search for specific free books?
This is where it gets a little tricky, but it is simple to edit a url and add more options. To search for a specific term, we need to edit the url (by clicking on the browser bar) and adding a new parameter to the beginning of the search (just after /s?). Copy/paste does not always work, so manually edit the url.

This has to be added to the beginning, right after the ? If you want to search for "java" for example (something I've seen recently), add k=java& between the ? and i in the example above.

So go to the url I listed above and click on your browser bar and place the cursor between the ? and i, then add k=java&

Adding "Java" to our URL search would then be (after amazon.co.uk):
/s?k=java&i=digital-text&rh=n%3A341689031%2Cp_36%3A-0

This should be clear in which part I've added.

Want to search for more than one word? Just add the two values, with a + between them. So searching for free books on Java and adding HTML to the search means adding k=java+html& between the ? and i:
/s?k=java+html&i=digital-text&rh=n%3A341689031%2Cp_36%3A-0

Want to find free Charles Dickens books? Add the following to amazon.co.uk
/s?k=charles+dickens&i=digital-text&rh=n%3A341689031%2Cp_36%3A-0

So, if you just want free books, you can use the link I've provided and if you want to search for specific authors / subjects, hopefully I've given enough examples on how to edit your search to do that.

A reminder that sponsored results will still show up and some of these will not be free. Also, I've found mixed results with linking / copying and pasting urls, especially with terms I've used before. Amazon sometimes alters results based on cookies/previous searches and then also adds paid books. In that case, open the url I listed in a new window/tab and then edit the url again to add your own search parameter.
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Thanks just what I needed.
Sometimes it's simpler to just add a random but non-operator symbol to the search string to obtain a gazillion more results. Suitable random characters would be * or [ but any non-operator will (should?) work. Examples below for search results for << magnetic >> that were originally filtered for << Free UK Delivery by Amazon >> and << Sort by: Price high to low >>:
Search term << magnetic >> = 108 results
Search term << magnetic [ >> = 200,000+ results
The second search URL text string simply has the two additional characters << +[ >> added immediately after the base search text of << magnetic >>.
Pity that this has now been moved to discussions. I understand why, it's not a specific deal for one product but more of an information thread.

I tried to get it put into Freebies, as I was getting a little fed up of seeing deals for things like a single Amazon free book, to try to inform others how to get a complete list. Sadly it won't really get much exposure here, never mind though....
AndyRoyd14/08/2019 11:30

Sometimes it's simpler to just add a random but non-operator symbol to the …Sometimes it's simpler to just add a random but non-operator symbol to the search string to obtain a gazillion more results. Suitable random characters would be * or [ but any non-operator will (should?) work. Examples below for search results for << magnetic >> that were originally filtered for << Free UK Delivery by Amazon >> and << Sort by: Price high to low >>:Search term << magnetic >> = 108 resultsSearch term << magnetic [ >> = 200,000+ results The second search URL text string simply has the two additional characters << +[ >> added immediately after the base search text of << magnetic >>.


Yes, sometimes getting more results is a pain though...I often want to narrow results.

Sorting is completely screwed up though, so your example works well then. For example, search for "lacoste trainers", then select size 9 and it shows 183 results. Then sort by price, only around 23 results shown. As you say though, then adding +* to the search parameter does increase results back to 160, but still, where have the other 23 gone?

Their sort function really needs some work and would like to see some improvements to searching too.
this is amazing, my friends mother needed some books for her kindle, thanks for showing that!
Well done OP. Some great info. ⭐⭐
DeepSeaDozzer14/08/2019 12:00

...Their sort function really needs some work and would like to see some …...Their sort function really needs some work and would like to see some improvements to searching too.


It is unrealistic to expect to be presented with results of what you are searching for. Amazon simply presents what it thinks it can sell to its customer based on the customer's unique browsing history amalgamated to information obtained from other sources about that customer. Even you aquiring a freebie ebook has positive marketing value towards subsequent search results.
Hit Amazon with an SAR, you will be provided with likely gigabytes of data that Amazon holds about you and your browsing habits / interests, especially if you use Echo / Alexa services.
AndyRoyd14/08/2019 13:41

It is unrealistic to expect to be presented with results of what you are …It is unrealistic to expect to be presented with results of what you are searching for. Amazon simply presents what it thinks it can sell to its customer based on the customer's unique browsing history amalgamated to information obtained from other sources about that customer. Even you aquiring a freebie ebook has positive marketing value towards subsequent search results.Hit Amazon with an SAR, you will be provided with likely gigabytes of data that Amazon holds about you and your browsing habits / interests, especially if you use Echo / Alexa services.


I realise that the search is structured differently and uses a variety of algorithms, my criticism in the main is with the sort function.

As per my example, I've searched and got 183 results, so why if I select "sort by price low to high" do I only see 23 results and not 183? Adding +* manually to the search url though (as per your example) does then list 160, which is close. Same thing happens after searching for jeans and selecting a size, 534 results. Change sort order from featured to price and I get 58 results (unless I amend the URL, then I get 530+ again).

Neither of these scenarios make any sense to me, I haven't changed the search parameters, all I have done is selected a different sort order. If anything, I should see more results by not selecting "featured".

I'd like to see searching improved too but I do know that just won't happen....
Blimey. You do know if you join your local library there's apps to loan a book or audio book to kindle or phone for free.

Usually via borrowbox.
Nice one. Thanks
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