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I have been asked to do a ten minute presentation at an interview, any advice please?

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Found 14th Nov 2014
hi all, I have been offered an interview for a new job, the email the employer has sent has mentioned an interview panel and giving a ten minute presentation on what is good customer service/challenges in managing a small team. I have never had to deal with an interview panel, and I have never done a presentation. Can anyone give me any advice or tips please? As if any ordinary interview wouldn't be nerve racking enough. Thanks in advance:)
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This is normal enough for this type of role.

What industry is the role for?

Think what is important to this industry being a team leader/manager? Motivation? Targets etc.

One piece of advice do not exceed 10 minutes, make sure you practice it and remember that it will likely take you twice as quick doing it in interview as you do practicing it. Always allow time at the end for questions so aim for a 8 minute presentation. Dont have the slides too busy, talk through the points rather than have the information on the slide e.g. if talking about motivation have the point on the slide saying motivation and then talk through how you actually motivate your team.
Have they said whether or not you can use Powerpoint or handouts, or is it all going to be verbal/discussion?
Prepare and rehearse over and over. The more confident you are with what you're talking about, the better. Nothing worse than listening to a presentation from someone who is clearly either (a) awkward and uncomfortable and (b) Not confident with the subject matter.
Good luck!
Easy, just use lots of examples you've come across in your experience in a similar role.

And google is also your friend for information on those subjects.
I know it doesn't seem it now but if it helps you ten minutes will fly by.
As has been said practice first, you won't have to put much in to it but don't over run.
Don't do the apprentice 'I'm the best in the world at what I do', be honest, but not too honest :-)
I can only re-iterate: prepare properly and rehearse.

"Frame" your speech. You have a start, middle and end to your piece. It's like the 10 o' clock news. Your "start" is an introduction - tell your audience what you will be talking about (The "headlines"). The middle is the actual content (the stories in detail). The end is a short summary (and maybe an amusing or memorable observation, something that the audience can hopefully take away with them). As I said, just like the News.They do it that way on the News for good reason.

Once you have your speech,ready, practice by first doing your piece in front of the mirror. It sounds stupid, but just try it. Next, ask a small group of friends/family to be your audience. Sure, you may think it's nerve-racking but I promise, once you have done "public speaking" once (even in front of a group that you know), your nerves will be largely gone the next time you do it - you won't worry about that aspect so much again (ever, I found) and you can just concentrate on your content. Also, get someone to time you to make sure that aspect's o.k. Maybe you'll make mistakes first time round - but it's best to get them out of the way in the rehearsal rather than the real thing. The more you practice the better you will become.

The next time you do it (for real), trust me, it will be a LOT easier. After all, you've already done it once, and you survived!

You may have to read from a script first time, As you get better, see if you can just work off bullet points - perhaps on a series of prompt cards. It's much better if you can look at the audience rather than staring at a script.

If you don't practice, when you do your thing, what seems like 8-10 minutes will probably actually be 3-4 minutes because you will probably just be racing to get it over and done with.

If you have prepared properly, you may just actually find that you actually enjoy the experience and get a buzz out of it!
P.S. Smile, and try to engage (i.e. look at, but try not to stare) all of your audience.
thanks for all the advice, as I have never used powerpoint I have decided to use handouts as interview is Tuesday and doesn't give me a lot of time to prepare it and practice it, don't want to get in there, find there is a problem and panic, would prefer to keep it simple, at the end of the day I am trying to bear in mind that it is about if I am right for the role or not, not how fancy my presentation is, as long as I present myself as capable and professional, and able to do the job, I will be fairly happy(once it's over), thanks for the tips, I will spend the weekend preparing , nearly didn't accept the interview when I saw what I have to do, but determined as you don't get on in life if you don't take a chance.
Muzz

This is normal enough for this type of role.What industry is the role … This is normal enough for this type of role.What industry is the role for? Think what is important to this industry being a team leader/manager? Motivation? Targets etc.One piece of advice do not exceed 10 minutes, make sure you practice it and remember that it will likely take you twice as quick doing it in interview as you do practicing it. Always allow time at the end for questions so aim for a 8 minute presentation. Dont have the slides too busy, talk through the points rather than have the information on the slide e.g. if talking about motivation have the point on the slide saying motivation and then talk through how you actually motivate your team.



hi, I have never officially led a team, I have trained and supervised staff but never officially been a manager etc, job description was not overly clear(a reception and bookings lead at private clinic dealing with minor ops etc,) didn't realise I would be leading a small team, although the email I received about interview says I should talk about challenges in managing a small team. I have done this in an unofficial way in two jobs though, so that is what I will emphasise, it's just the formality of a talk that is scaring me.
Aye, ten minutes can fly by.

The thing to remember is that you can't cover everything about the topic in 10 minutes. So, start asking yourself:

-Why does the employer want to know these things?

Answer - they don't, particularly. They want to know what YOU think about them and whether or not YOUR views tie into theirs i.e. whether or not you will be a good fit for their company.

I always start by trying to prepare a single slide which gets across the key messages I want to convey. I also use this as a prompt during the presentation in case I forget my place, and I also use it to time my presentation.

So, you've got 10 minutes. I'd start approaching it like this:

Minute 1 - Brief introduction, who you are, what you're going to cover and why.

Minutes 2 through 5 - Customer Service
Identify three key points, and talk about each one for a minute

Minutes 6 through 9 - Challenges in managing a small team
Identify three key points, and talk about each one for a minute.

Minute 10 - wrap-up, ask if anyone has any questions.

Tip 1 - if you can explain how challenges in managing a small team can impact customer service, I think that would be looked upon favourably.
Tip 2 - if you can relate any of the points to the specific line of business of the employer, that looks good.
Tip 3 - please, please try and include real life examples. It always comes across really well if you can identify a negative situation (bad customer service or bad challenges in managing a small team) and explain how you personally dealt with it.

In fact, a potential approach for this interview might be - if you have one - to do a 10 minute storytelling exercise covering one single situation where you had a challenge in managing a small team which threatened to escalate and have a negative impact on customer service.

You could then make some bullet points about
-What happened
-What you did
-How what you did had a positive resolution.
-How all of this impacted positively on a small team and customer service

Remember, the presentation should not be about the topic, it should be about YOU and what YOU can do in relation to the topic. You're selling YOURSELF - how good YOU are at customer service and/or managing challenges.

Just a few thoughts, anyway.
mousey

Good luck!



thanks x
thanks so much for the replies. I knew I would get some help here, so many helpful people
I had to do a presentation for my last promotion interview,it's really not too bad.

Remember the presentation is less to do with the content and more to do with how you present yourself and your communication skills. Definitely a beginning, middle and end is the best approach but when it comes to content try to inject some of your personality. You may want to include some humour (depending on your personality and the position), this is the part of the interview when they can get an idea of how you will present yourself and perform if you get the job so make sure you make them remember you.
Also they are likely to score you in how you use resources, an important part of many jobs, if you are unfamiliar with PowerPoint maybe consider taking some pre-prepared flipchart sheets, you want to show you can use as many resources available to you.
Be prepared for questions.
A basic point people forget in interview is always use I never we, even when working in a team they want to know about you and your role so always use I did .....
Good luck, hope it goes well and def smile!
thanks for all the advice. I felt I did really well on presentation and interview, remembered to smile, used powepoint, smiled and looked at the interviewers etc. Unfortunately they had lots of more experienced applicants so I didn't get the job, I asked for feedback on interview and it was all positive. Thanks again for all the helpful advice you all gave, as it helped me a lot and I will be more experienced for next time I have an interview. I knew hotukdealers could help, thanks again
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