I need help buying broadband

16
Found 22nd May
Hey guys I need help with buying a broadband. I don’t want something with regular speed.. we prefer something faster...
Could someone tell me about speeds and companies that offer cheap broadband
Thanks
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AskBroadband
16 Comments
I think you'll find no one does cheap broadband.
It's all post code based so would need your address to find the best available in your area.

uswitch.com/bro…er/
Edited by: "emodan" 22nd May
AW007940 m ago

I think you'll find no one does cheap broadband.


Depends on your definition of ‘cheap’ I guess? It’s subjective.
Basically fibre broadband is your best bet if it’s available in your area.

Companies such as virgin media and if it’s available via BT then you can also look at sky, talk talk and many many more since they use BT’s cabling to deliver their services. If your rural and it’s available there are providers that transmit to an antenna that fits on your home, it is more expensive but would provide the speeds you need.

Terms you will need to be familiar with are:

FTTC - fibre to the cabinet (mainly utilised by BT)
FTTP - fibre to the premises (faster, mainly used by businesses and is available to consumers in parts of big cities like London only)
Edited by: "cmdr_elito" 22nd May
ipswich7820 m ago

Depends on your definition of ‘cheap’ I guess? It’s subjective.


Surely as a widely available product with transparent pricing, cheap in this instance is based on comparability with other similar providers on the market, rather than in comparison with your earnings/net worth.

Thats the whole basis for this website after all.

And I would agree, none are particularly cheaper than the others after introduction offers.
Another thing to consider is the quality of customer service. For companies using the BT infra-structure Talk talk is notoriously bad, BT is OK, Plusnet is good. If you go via Virgin, you are stuck with Virgin as they use their own cabling. See what's available in your area first, then have another think about what you need.
If where you live gets decent ADSL speed
then you don't need fibre
check out the comparison web sites like uswitch or compare the market for example as these will compare all providers for your area and will show prices
How about dial up?
AW00792 m ago

How about dial up?


This.
Avoid talktalk. They have been voted the worst provider year after year
ding1 h, 50 m ago

check out the comparison web sites like uswitch or compare the market for …check out the comparison web sites like uswitch or compare the market for example as these will compare all providers for your area and will show prices


All providers? The big general comparison sites compare a tiny number of ISPs, usually just the largest dozen or so. I've yet to find a decent ISP comparison site, but ISPReview has a reasonably complete list of ISPs.


@Merry000

There are around seven types of broadband currently available:

1. ADSL2+, sometimes advertised as normal broadband these days. Available in most places. Bandwidth is between 2Mbps and 24Mbps depending on the length of cable between your house and the local phone exchange.

2. VDSL2. Also known as Fibre and FTTC. Available pretty widely now (~85% coverage) with speeds ranging from 80Mbps down to single digits depending on line length to the local green cabinet.

3. G.Fast. Sometimes sold under the Ultrafast Fibre label. The newest version of the above two. Works like VDSL except it's faster (up to 300Mbps) but speed drops off more quickly with distance. Currently fairly low coverage but last I heard the plan was to roll it out aggressively over the next couple of years.

3. Virgin Media's network, aka cable broadband. Around 50% coverage of the UK, mostly in urban areas. I've never seen any details on the minimum speed but anecdotally they seem to prefer refusing connection over dropping the speed so most seem to get close to the same speed. Maximum goes up to 300 or 350Mbps.

4. FTTP. aka FTTH. Ultimate broadband. A pure fibre optic cable all the way. The big 1Gbps is often offered but few devices can use it so it's effectively as fast as possible. Coverage is low and grows slowly, often it's restricted to new builds and rich city areas. There's a 3 million homes target by 2020 (there are around 25 million homes in the UK).

5. Geostationary Satellite Broadband. 100% coverage (except a few spots where line of sight is blocked by tall buildings or terrain) and speeds seem fairly consistent (15-30Mbps). Ping times are high though, so it's not ideal for activities that require fast interaction (e.g. online gaming). They also tend to have data caps.

6. Fixed Wireless Access. aka. Wireless broadband. You put an aerial up on the side of your house and you get broadband through a wireless link. This is a common option in rural areas with lots of little separate networks each run by it's own company. Speeds vary but tend to be 10-20Mbps.

7. Mobile Broadband. Broadband over the mobile phone network. The same tech as you use to get internet on your phone. You can share it off your phone, but if it was your main home broadband you'd typically have a mains powered router instead so you didn't have to worry about battery life or anything. Speeds are typically 5-20Mbps and vary based on the time of day (number of other users) and it does typically have data caps.


Given the wide variability of speeds based on location it doesn't make much sense to talk about a regular speed. What sort of speed are you currently getting and are you happy with it?

Price-wise you'll generally pay more for faster speeds but which really fast options are available to you and how much you'll pay depends on your location.
EndlessWaves8 m ago

All providers? The big general comparison sites compare a tiny number of …All providers? The big general comparison sites compare a tiny number of ISPs, usually just the largest dozen or so. I've yet to find a decent ISP comparison site, but ISPReview has a reasonably complete list of ISPs. @Merry000 There are around seven types of broadband currently available:1. ADSL2+, sometimes advertised as normal broadband these days. Available in most places. Bandwidth is between 2Mbps and 24Mbps depending on the length of cable between your house and the local phone exchange.2. VDSL2. Also known as Fibre and FTTC. Available pretty widely now (~85% coverage) with speeds ranging from 80Mbps down to single digits depending on line length to the local green cabinet. 3. G.Fast. Sometimes sold under the Ultrafast Fibre label. The newest version of the above two. Works like VDSL except it's faster (up to 300Mbps) but speed drops off more quickly with distance. Currently fairly low coverage but last I heard the plan was to roll it out aggressively over the next couple of years. 3. Virgin Media's network, aka cable broadband. Around 50% coverage of the UK, mostly in urban areas. I've never seen any details on the minimum speed but anecdotally they seem to prefer refusing connection over dropping the speed so most seem to get close to the same speed. Maximum goes up to 300 or 350Mbps. 4. FTTP. aka FTTH. Ultimate broadband. A pure fibre optic cable all the way. The big 1Gbps is often offered but few devices can use it so it's effectively as fast as possible. Coverage is low and grows slowly, often it's restricted to new builds and rich city areas. There's a 3 million homes target by 2020 (there are around 25 million homes in the UK). 5. Geostationary Satellite Broadband. 100% coverage (except a few spots where line of sight is blocked by tall buildings or terrain) and speeds seem fairly consistent (15-30Mbps). Ping times are high though, so it's not ideal for activities that require fast interaction (e.g. online gaming). They also tend to have data caps. 6. Fixed Wireless Access. aka. Wireless broadband. You put an aerial up on the side of your house and you get broadband through a wireless link. This is a common option in rural areas with lots of little separate networks each run by it's own company. Speeds vary but tend to be 10-20Mbps.7. Mobile Broadband. Broadband over the mobile phone network. The same tech as you use to get internet on your phone. You can share it off your phone, but if it was your main home broadband you'd typically have a mains powered router instead so you didn't have to worry about battery life or anything. Speeds are typically 5-20Mbps and vary based on the time of day (number of other users) and it does typically have data caps.Given the wide variability of speeds based on location it doesn't make much sense to talk about a regular speed. What sort of speed are you currently getting and are you happy with it?Price-wise you'll generally pay more for faster speeds but which really fast options are available to you and how much you'll pay depends on your location.


Ok not all providers but enough for a NORMAL person to look over, but as your obviously some sort of nerdy big bang theory boffin then it probably wont satisfy your needs
ding11 m ago

Ok not all providers but enough for a NORMAL person to look over, but as …Ok not all providers but enough for a NORMAL person to look over, but as your obviously some sort of nerdy big bang theory boffin then it probably wont satisfy your needs


But it's not even a representative cross-section. It tends to be just those providers who offer big up front discounts and higher ongoing costs if you stay with them.

A 'price comparison' site that only has the ISPs that are expensive in the long term is useless, unless you want to chop and change every year.
Edited by: "EndlessWaves" 22nd May
EndlessWaves4 h, 3 m ago

All providers? The big general comparison sites compare a tiny number of …All providers? The big general comparison sites compare a tiny number of ISPs, usually just the largest dozen or so. I've yet to find a decent ISP comparison site, but ISPReview has a reasonably complete list of ISPs. @Merry000 There are around seven types of broadband currently available:1. ADSL2+, sometimes advertised as normal broadband these days. Available in most places. Bandwidth is between 2Mbps and 24Mbps depending on the length of cable between your house and the local phone exchange.2. VDSL2. Also known as Fibre and FTTC. Available pretty widely now (~85% coverage) with speeds ranging from 80Mbps down to single digits depending on line length to the local green cabinet. 3. G.Fast. Sometimes sold under the Ultrafast Fibre label. The newest version of the above two. Works like VDSL except it's faster (up to 300Mbps) but speed drops off more quickly with distance. Currently fairly low coverage but last I heard the plan was to roll it out aggressively over the next couple of years. 3. Virgin Media's network, aka cable broadband. Around 50% coverage of the UK, mostly in urban areas. I've never seen any details on the minimum speed but anecdotally they seem to prefer refusing connection over dropping the speed so most seem to get close to the same speed. Maximum goes up to 300 or 350Mbps. 4. FTTP. aka FTTH. Ultimate broadband. A pure fibre optic cable all the way. The big 1Gbps is often offered but few devices can use it so it's effectively as fast as possible. Coverage is low and grows slowly, often it's restricted to new builds and rich city areas. There's a 3 million homes target by 2020 (there are around 25 million homes in the UK). 5. Geostationary Satellite Broadband. 100% coverage (except a few spots where line of sight is blocked by tall buildings or terrain) and speeds seem fairly consistent (15-30Mbps). Ping times are high though, so it's not ideal for activities that require fast interaction (e.g. online gaming). They also tend to have data caps. 6. Fixed Wireless Access. aka. Wireless broadband. You put an aerial up on the side of your house and you get broadband through a wireless link. This is a common option in rural areas with lots of little separate networks each run by it's own company. Speeds vary but tend to be 10-20Mbps.7. Mobile Broadband. Broadband over the mobile phone network. The same tech as you use to get internet on your phone. You can share it off your phone, but if it was your main home broadband you'd typically have a mains powered router instead so you didn't have to worry about battery life or anything. Speeds are typically 5-20Mbps and vary based on the time of day (number of other users) and it does typically have data caps.Given the wide variability of speeds based on location it doesn't make much sense to talk about a regular speed. What sort of speed are you currently getting and are you happy with it?Price-wise you'll generally pay more for faster speeds but which really fast options are available to you and how much you'll pay depends on your location.


Wow. Thank you for your time & advice
Hey guys thank you all for the info.... I will be comparing companies & prices using the comparison websites but thanks a lot for your comments again as I’ve got an idea of companies
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