Ikea - 365 Day Return vs Legal Two Year Minimum Guarantee - WWYD?

16
Posted 24th Jun
Looking for some help with an issue returning stuff to Ikea.

I have a couple of Tradrfi smart GU10 bulbs that I bought last February. Around the start of the year they starting showing degraded performance (wouldn't come on at full brightness, flickered heavily). Knowing that there is a legal two year minimum guarantee for defective items I thought "no problem".

So as everything has started to open back up I thought I would get round to returning them. Went to the returns desk at my local outlet and was told "no luck". The guy behind the desk told me it was only 1 year and that was that. Stupidly I was only vaguely familiar with the regulation so didn't stand my ground. But after Googling the issue 2 years did appear to be law so I approached another member of staff to ask who I should raise the issue with higher up? It actually turned out to be the duty manager and he said I should ring customer services (which I've just realised are closed due to pandemic......).

So what can I do? I will obviously try somehow to contact CS but might be difficult. Also how helpful are they likely to be... Does anyone know of a default phrase/paragraph I should arm myself with regarding the law ("In accordance with law XYZ etc") and how I get the issue resolved swiftly? The bulbs are only worth £14 so I don't want to waste too much time on the issue (already wasted the petrol out to the store so more about the principle now). Should I try going back to the store if I'm passing (although given the manager didn't want to step in seems unlikely to be fruitful....)?

Thanks in advance.

P.S: I think there is a confusion with this guy (or maybe all of Ikea's return desks... possibly deliberately....?) between the 365 days generous "hey you don't like the item, then return it!" policy vs Ikea's legal requirement to offer two years guarantee for defective items. The time between buying and becoming defective was so short I don't think I could have reached the rated hours of usage even if the bulbs had been on 24/7! Clearly defective. I've had other LEDS last 5/6 years with the same level of usage.

Also noted is that they don't sell these line of bulbs anymore and that I had a third bulb (bought at the same time) that I previously received a refund for that had stopped working after a few months. Dodgy product from the off it seems.
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where are you getting this 2 year defective product law?
16 Comments
Last February was less than 365 days ago. Do you mean February last year?
I would give cs a try or speak to the store again. Maybe state you want a replacement or say will it matter in a week or more if I don’t get £14 back

Then using that answer proceed with life..

It’s a pain alternative is email them or try fb.. but if it’s not mega money then life is too short..
where are you getting this 2 year defective product law?
Hope you get it sorted OP! The tradrfi range is a perfect example of buy cheap, buy twice. Keep your eyes peeled for a Hue bargain and never look back
jamstaruk197224/06/2020 11:35

where are you getting this 2 year defective product law?



europa.eu/you…htm
* I'm just using this as a source because it lays it out clearly, nothing political. This law is UK law as well as EU.
‘The bulbs are only worth £14 so I don’t want to waste too much time on the issue’


I think you’ve reached this and should just accept it.
£14 for bulbs that lasted a year before showing signs of lower performance means you are half way through the law you quoted so in effect only £7 loss at the moment as they have already lasted a year. Trip to ikea to sort which failed. Let’s say you value your time at a wage of £10 per hour. I suspect you are well past the point at which the gain of getting any form of resolution is surpassed by the minimal amount of money concerned and the time already spent dealing with it.

Move on I say.
Edited by: "ArcadeAssassin" 24th Jun
A1RN24/06/2020 12:09

https://europa.eu/youreurope/citizens/consumers/shopping/guarantees-returns/faq/index_en.htm* I'm just using this as a source because it lays it out clearly, nothing political. This law is UK law as well as EU.



from your link :
  • Any fault that appears within 6 months will be presumed to have existed at the time of delivery. The seller must then repair or replace your phone free of charge, or reimburse you if repair or replacement is impossible.
  • After 6 months, you can still hold the seller responsible for any defects up to the end of the two-year guarantee period. However, the seller can ask you to prove that the defect existed when your goods were delivered. This is often difficult, and you will may have to involve a technical expert.

what guarantee did it give on the box/instructions? if it said 2 or 3 etc they would refund them?
It is not clear whether you are seeking replacements, refund (total/partial), simple apology.
You probably have the law right when it comes to defective items (not fit for purpose).
Citizens Advice are very good with providing guidance and support pursuing your issues. Follow the trail(s) from their web page
citizensadvice.org.uk/con…er/
or give them a ring.
You may though have already concluded that the cost in real money, time and your well being is just not worth it on this occasion, but I understand it would be nice to know exactly where you stand should similar issues occur in the future.
Thanks for all the advice and likes folks. One email to CS claiming "faulty goods" and then if that bears no fruit I think I'll cut my losses. Would happily have accepted credit to spend in store but now will be steering clear of Ikea the rest of my days. Great way of doing business! For contrast, also had to return something defective to Lidl this week. No receipt. 5 minute phonecall to customer services. Letter sent out first class to take into any store for cash refund. That's how it's done!
A1RN24/06/2020 13:15

Thanks for all the advice and likes folks. One email to CS claiming …Thanks for all the advice and likes folks. One email to CS claiming "faulty goods" and then if that bears no fruit I think I'll cut my losses. Would happily have accepted credit to spend in store but now will be steering clear of Ikea the rest of my days. Great way of doing business! For contrast, also had to return something defective to Lidl this week. No receipt. 5 minute phonecall to customer services. Letter sent out first class to take into any store for cash refund. That's how it's done!


no reciept cash refund? shoplifters must be licking their lips
Try leaving a review on their website, I did this for a floor protector and was told to return the item for replacement or refund. One caveat that this was recently during lockdown and I had bought the item this year. But it may be worth a go
jamstaruk197224/06/2020 11:35

where are you getting this 2 year defective product law?



I believe he is the referring to an EU Directive Legislation - Consumer Sales and Guarantee Directive 1999/44/EC . Sellers of consumer goods have to guarantee that the goods are in conformity with the contract for a minimum period of two years after the delivery of the goods.

Supposedly this is superseded by the Sale of Goods Act 1979 – now the Consumer Rights Act 2015 which gives up to 6 years to claim for faulty appliances. whitegoodshelp.co.uk/fau…ct/
The two year is the minimum duration for buyers to raise an issue that member states have to enact into law. UK law (consumer rights act) gives you five years, six in some places (England and Wales?)

As Jamstar points out, it's not an unconditional right to return and won't cover items that have failed due to normal lifespan variation.

However, Ikea appears to claim a 25,000 hour lifespan on those bulbs - 12 years if they're on 6 hours a day - so failing after less than a year and a half should definitely be considered a defective product.
Edited by: "EndlessWaves" 24th Jun
EndlessWaves24/06/2020 22:52

The two year is the minimum duration for buyers to raise an issue that …The two year is the minimum duration for buyers to raise an issue that member states have to enact into law. UK law (consumer rights act) gives you five years, six in some places (England and Wales?)As Jamstar points out, it's not an unconditional right to return and won't cover items that have failed due to normal lifespan variation.However, Ikea appears to claim a 25,000 hour lifespan on those bulbs - 12 years if they're on 6 hours a day - so failing after less than a year and a half should definitely be considered a defective product.




one point that is missed is that under the consumers right act, it is your responsibility to prove the issue was their after 6 months, unless there is a manufacters warranty. This was supposed to make it easier for consumers but to many made it more complex as their expert and legal team will in most cases always be bigger than ours.
eslick25/06/2020 13:02

one point that is missed is that under the consumers right act, it is your …one point that is missed is that under the consumers right act, it is your responsibility to prove the issue was their after 6 months, unless there is a manufacters warranty. This was supposed to make it easier for consumers but to many made it more complex as their expert and legal team will in most cases always be bigger than ours.


Well, you have to provide reasonable evidence that the fault is with the product, such as an expert opinion.

IANAL so I couldn't provide you the evidence of previous court decisions on the subject but for a £14 product I suspect it'd be enough to simply point out that the actual lifespan was far below the quoted average lifespan and that electronics and LEDs are not generally understood to have a highly variable lifespan.
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