Injured pigeon

19
Found 27th Jun
On Friday we found an injured pigeon. I think it has been attacked by a bird of prey, it has a puncture would under its wing that is also droopy, it cannot fly at the moment.

i have cleaned up the wound with warm water and have been checking it for fly eggs and brushing them out aswell as keeping it fed and watered. In the day I have been letting it roam the garden and putting it in a pet carrier at night to keep it safe.
it seems to be doing ok strength wise although it’s wing is still droopy.
I am am aware that most vets will just euthanise pigeons and I did find a pigeon friendly wildlife rescue local to us but the lady advised that they would also euthanise any pigeons with broken wings as they will likely never fly again so cannot be released back to the wild.

We don’t want the bird to be killed if it recovers but just can’t fly as it can still have a life walking around. Are there any rules about keeping a disabled wild pigeon long term. If it heals from it’s injury but remains flightless we would look to keep looking after it and will get it a coop/run so it has a safe place to live.

i know many people see pigeons as vermin, but it’s still a living creature
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If its wing is broken, then no amount of washing it with water will get it out of pain. I do understand your point of view but think you should the right thing and take it to a vet or wildlife centre.
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You wouldn't be doing it any favours by keeping it alive if the wing is broken.
Give it a few days and see. It may recover or it may just die.
If it's still alive but not able to fly I would get the vet to put it down.
It will be kindest to take it to be put to sleep
If you want to keep it as a pet you still need to take it to a vet to have an operation, broken bones are very painful. It would probably need the wing amputated. I love your kindness, but it will be in pain so will need veterinary attention. Not all vets will put to sleep, it will depend on the injuries sustained, which you will not know until you have got some help. Best thing to do is ring around, and find out what the vets policies are
I would add that as I am no vet, I am unsure if the wing is broken or if it is just the wound making its wing droop and stopping it flying.
if it is still strong and well after a couple of weeks I would be willing to pay to have it’s wing set or treated so that it doesn’t drag or have pain, but as birds bones are hollow, they are unlikely to fly again even if repaired.
i don’t want to kill it if it has a chance of life, so just want to know if there’s any legal things about it. A google search mentions needing a license to keep some wild animals but doesn’t specify pigeons.
it is eating and drinking which is a good sign as I have read that birds in shock or pain won’t eat
Last time we tried to save an injured pigeon, we kept it in the garden and a cat came and ate it! Tried to call RSPCA beforehand but they were useless and gave no helpful advice.
farmlama11 m ago

I would add that as I am no vet, I am unsure if the wing is broken or if …I would add that as I am no vet, I am unsure if the wing is broken or if it is just the wound making its wing droop and stopping it flying.if it is still strong and well after a couple of weeks I would be willing to pay to have it’s wing set or treated so that it doesn’t drag or have pain, but as birds bones are hollow, they are unlikely to fly again even if repaired.i don’t want to kill it if it has a chance of life, so just want to know if there’s any legal things about it. A google search mentions needing a license to keep some wild animals but doesn’t specify pigeons.it is eating and drinking which is a good sign as I have read that birds in shock or pain won’t eat


Respect to you! It’s a nice thing you are doing, keep up the good work
I heard my neighbour once helped a pigeon that had a broken wing by putting a splint on it and taking care if it and it recovered and remains local always coming back to eat bird food that my neighbour puts out Great to hear a caring person helping an animal, I salute you ! Respect
If you were Martin Lewis the RSPCA would be round like a shot.
We had an injured one, called the number on the tag it was wearing but I presume yours is just a standard pigeon.

Turned out to be some blokes best racing pigeon and he was worried as it hadn't returned due to a storm.

It was quite happy in a rabbit run though and sat on a brick each morning waiting for breakfast.

I'd say if the wing is drooping then it wont fly again, if it's eating it probably isn't in too much pain.. see how it gets on in the next few days and take it to a vet if needed.

Not sure if a grounded pigeon would be a happy one in the long term, as bad as it sounds it might be best put to sleep.
Edited by: "dataload" 27th Jun
If it's eating and drinking then it's probably not that much in pain. However it'll be unlikely to fly again. If you're going to look after it then good for you op. Most places would put it down.
Respect for your efforts and caring nature but like you said they are vermin and they spread disease. The bones in the wing are very brittle and rarely heal. I'd suggest putting it out of pain and move on.
dudwood_fudwood3 h, 53 m ago

Respect for your efforts and caring nature but like you said they are …Respect for your efforts and caring nature but like you said they are vermin and they spread disease. The bones in the wing are very brittle and rarely heal. I'd suggest putting it out of pain and move on.


I never said they are vermin and spread disease. I said that some people think they are vermin but I see it as any other living creature that should have a chance of life. The belief that pigeons spread disease to humans is also a common misconception and they are no more likely to pass on illness than a cat or dog.
i am aware that it will likely never fly again if it’s wing is broken, but that doesn’t mean we should kill it in my opinion.

i wasn’t really looking for people to egg me on to kill it. I have been looking into articles on its chances of having a healthy life and found many people with disabled birds that have led happy long lives.

i have already made the decision that we will look after it if it can never fully recover, so that was never my question.
All i I am looking to find out is if there’s anything I need to do legally if it stays as some searches mention needing licences to take in wild animals but didn’t specify if that relates to pigeons
Legally as pigeons are not protected you can do what you want with it. You will not get into any trouble if you keep it.
Edited by: "123thisisme" 28th Jun
farmlama1 h, 52 m ago

I never said they are vermin and spread disease. I said that some people …I never said they are vermin and spread disease. I said that some people think they are vermin but I see it as any other living creature that should have a chance of life. The belief that pigeons spread disease to humans is also a common misconception and they are no more likely to pass on illness than a cat or dog.i am aware that it will likely never fly again if it’s wing is broken, but that doesn’t mean we should kill it in my opinion.i wasn’t really looking for people to egg me on to kill it. I have been looking into articles on its chances of having a healthy life and found many people with disabled birds that have led happy long lives.i have already made the decision that we will look after it if it can never fully recover, so that was never my question. All i I am looking to find out is if there’s anything I need to do legally if it stays as some searches mention needing licences to take in wild animals but didn’t specify if that relates to pigeons


Like it or not they do spread disease and are vermin. When they breed so fast and visit farms etc for food and crap into cattle feed etc that poses a health risk. They are not a protected bird for a reason. Hence why people shoot them. Fair play you want to save it but they are a nuicance. Just because it CAN survive doesn’t mean that it should. It is meant to fly. Broken wing = poor life style. Why put it through that if you are so caring for them?
Edited by: "dudwood_fudwood" 28th Jun
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dudwood_fudwood2 h, 16 m ago

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And your link just confirms that they can be considered vermin, but that is down to individual point of view and also states that it is rare that they will infect disease to humans. So you kinda just proved my point.

rabbits and rats can also be considered vermin, but I have had those as pets in the past.
farmlama21 m ago

And your link just confirms that they can be considered vermin, but that …And your link just confirms that they can be considered vermin, but that is down to individual point of view and also states that it is rare that they will infect disease to humans. So you kinda just proved my point.rabbits and rats can also be considered vermin, but I have had those as pets in the past.


I think we’ll just have to agree to disagree. It’s rare to transmit disease to humans (rare but it happens, especially to those with weak immune systems) but they can and do transmit disease to livestock etc. I also don’t keep rabbits or ratsand would shoot those. I can’t imagine you’d do the same for an injured sewer rat.
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