Investing

21
Found 25th May
Hello!

Just curious as to what other people invest in financially to give stability in the later years? I took a rather calculated gamble in the stock market. The worst one.. AIM. Been in it approaching 5 years now, been in the same company for around 3-4 years.

Some people just keep their money aside, but I wanted something that would be larger than your standard bank interest rate.

Any other alternatives? I don't invest in digital currencies, as I see no tangible asset against it to support it.

Genuinely interested!
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Lifetime ISA?
I have pensions, I have shares, I have an isa and I have rental property.
I have my pension from work. It’s a final salary scheme so I don’t really have a huge amount of other investments, other than a couple of ISAs.

I won’t be leaving the company either before I retire as my job isn’t transferable to any other company in the UK
I've got all eggs in one basket at the moment, but will diversify in a few years too. So looking at alternative options!

What shares do you purchase? Safe bets such as Google?

Never looked at a lifetime ISA though!
Property, stocks, cash.

But most importantly my health by trying to lead an active and stress free lifestyle
Physical gold as it is drastically underpriced and will skyrocket once the global financial crisis takes off.
Your best bet if you want financial stability for later years is a pension. You can claim tax relief on the money you put in, better still some employers will contribute to it on your behalf. Both these things combined will easily outperform any bank savings account. The earlier you start the easier it will be to achieve your goals.

Lifetime ISA may be worth looking at, but the downsides are that you can't open one past the age of 40, and you can't add to your investment past the age of 50. Also if you need to withdraw from it early for any other reasonthan buying your first house, the penalties may leave you worse off than before you started.

Investing in individual shares is very risky, even the professionals make mistakes. If you don't know what you're doing you'd be better off looking at global funds held in an ISA. If you're patient this will provide better diversification and for much less work and less risk than buying and selling shares.

For more tips and advice I would recommend reading the moneysavingexpert Savings & Investments and Pensions forums rather than reading some of the half baked advice you may get by asking on here.
mutley15 h, 7 m ago

Property, stocks, cash. But most importantly my health by trying to lead …Property, stocks, cash. But most importantly my health by trying to lead an active and stress free lifestyle


fuelled entirely by cake if your previous posts are to be believed? Mind you, healthy lifestyle doesn't always amount to a hill of beans. My husband ate seeds and leaves and all sorts and he was dead at 51. You can run ten miles a day like he did but you can't outrun genetics. I think the lesson to be learned is to take a balanced approach. Invest where you can but don't forget to live in the present. You might not make it to retirement age so make sure the life you have lived has some worth. Sounds like you may have the balance right for you, be active but enjoy cake.
Spend it while you can! Enjoy life you only get one!
Have you got a pension?
I used to read investors chronicle magazine every week when I was heavily investing.
psychobitchfromhell6 h, 22 m ago

fuelled entirely by cake if your previous posts are to be believed? Mind …fuelled entirely by cake if your previous posts are to be believed? Mind you, healthy lifestyle doesn't always amount to a hill of beans. My husband ate seeds and leaves and all sorts and he was dead at 51. You can run ten miles a day like he did but you can't outrun genetics. I think the lesson to be learned is to take a balanced approach. Invest where you can but don't forget to live in the present. You might not make it to retirement age so make sure the life you have lived has some worth. Sounds like you may have the balance right for you, be active but enjoy cake.


you may have noticed that i left out healthy eating as that is where i am failing. but otherwise i lead a very healthy lifestyle now, i didn't used to.

maintaining a healthy lifestyle will keep you healthier, active and happier longer. no one can change their genetic makeup but it is well known that your lifestyle has even more of an impact on your health and longevity than your genetic make up.
mutley15 m ago

you may have noticed that i left out healthy eating as that is where i am …you may have noticed that i left out healthy eating as that is where i am failing. but otherwise i lead a very healthy lifestyle now, i didn't used to.maintaining a healthy lifestyle will keep you healthier, active and happier longer. no one can change their genetic makeup but it is well known that your lifestyle has even more of an impact on your health and longevity than your genetic make up.


Unfortunately that isn't always the case
Guzzle9 h, 56 m ago

Your best bet if you want financial stability for later years is a …Your best bet if you want financial stability for later years is a pension. You can claim tax relief on the money you put in, better still some employers will contribute to it on your behalf. Both these things combined will easily outperform any bank savings account. The earlier you start the easier it will be to achieve your goals. Lifetime ISA may be worth looking at, but the downsides are that you can't open one past the age of 40, and you can't add to your investment past the age of 50. Also if you need to withdraw from it early for any other reasonthan buying your first house, the penalties may leave you worse off than before you started.Investing in individual shares is very risky, even the professionals make mistakes. If you don't know what you're doing you'd be better off looking at global funds held in an ISA. If you're patient this will provide better diversification and for much less work and less risk than buying and selling shares.For more tips and advice I would recommend reading the moneysavingexpert Savings & Investments and Pensions forums rather than reading some of the half baked advice you may get by asking on here.


snoopy184 h, 45 m ago

Have you got a pension?



I've got a company pension through royal london which also have funds, I've set that to high risk. I'm in the position of not wanting to work to retirement age anyway - who does I guess. I'm 30 now, but having limited myself as much as I could in my earlier years (I went to uni, so I've lived all the drunken states you get in and what not. I mean lads holidays and not buying tat) and saved what I could, I'd put all my savings in a stocks and shares ISA. Last year managed to get down a deposit on a house which we're both now living in without touching any shares. I had a help to buy, which I was wrongly advised on websites that I couldn't use when I could so that's still open too. 3.5% APR on that, but recently took that out and added to my investment and that's worked out fairly well.

I'll check the lifetime pension

Other ideas I've been having are property developments, not sure of risk of those. Alternatively, buying and selling property too. Heard it's not so much a renters market as much, but I know nothing on the subject.
if you are already invested in aim take a look at VRS given me a nice little return. by no means I'm telling you to invest in it. do your own research first.i also bought a load of Lloyds RBS and BP when they were cheap. been holding them for years now. BP and Lloyds have recovered and it looks like the worst is behind RBS, just gonna HODL for now hopefully it will all be worth it in the end. got a few hundred in cryptos ....its what im willing to lose in the hope that one or two will surge for a pretty nice profit. good luck
Edited by: "discozohan" 26th May
I wouldn't touch aim shares - many aren't much better than gambling.

Safest is to put money into index tracker funds (in an isa wrapper). That gives you diversification rather than single share risk.

My last years ISA allowance went in £7K European index tracker, £3K Korea tracker, £8K China trackers, £2K oil company.

I'd suggest looking at things like fiveraday, nutmeg, moneyfarm, etc. They are lowish cost investment vehicles that allow either lump sum or monthly investments.

It is a good idea to have a wide range of investments as that mitigates risk. Many people think they are diversified but actually only have UK investments. I'd rather have a global outlook. Your view may differ from mine - I expect brexit to be a clusterF*** disaster so I'm not keen on uk investent at the moment. The reason the FTSE 100 is booming is because the £ is falling and the top 100 companies are mainly multinationals whos value isnt tied to the uk, just their price.

China and India both have strong growth and as well as being suppliers to us in the west are having huge growth in their own middle classes. brazil might also be a good bet (google BRICS investment).
discozohan2 h, 45 m ago

if you are already invested in aim take a look at VRS given me a nice …if you are already invested in aim take a look at VRS given me a nice little return. by no means I'm telling you to invest in it. do your own research first.i also bought a load of Lloyds RBS and BP when they were cheap. been holding them for years now. BP and Lloyds have recovered and it looks like the worst is behind RBS, just gonna HODL for now hopefully it will all be worth it in the end. got a few hundred in cryptos ....its what im willing to lose in the hope that one or two will surge for a pretty nice profit. good luck



mas9910 m ago

I wouldn't touch aim shares - many aren't much better than gambling.Safest …I wouldn't touch aim shares - many aren't much better than gambling.Safest is to put money into index tracker funds (in an isa wrapper). That gives you diversification rather than single share risk.My last years ISA allowance went in £7K European index tracker, £3K Korea tracker, £8K China trackers, £2K oil company.I'd suggest looking at things like fiveraday, nutmeg, moneyfarm, etc. They are lowish cost investment vehicles that allow either lump sum or monthly investments.It is a good idea to have a wide range of investments as that mitigates risk. Many people think they are diversified but actually only have UK investments. I'd rather have a global outlook. Your view may differ from mine - I expect brexit to be a clusterF*** disaster so I'm not keen on uk investent at the moment. The reason the FTSE 100 is booming is because the £ is falling and the top 100 companies are mainly multinationals whos value isnt tied to the uk, just their price.China and India both have strong growth and as well as being suppliers to us in the west are having huge growth in their own middle classes. brazil might also be a good bet (google BRICS investment).


I've seen that ticker mentioned before yeah, never had a look though. The hardest trick with AIM shares is finding a company that makes money. Forunately for me at the time we werent, but are now so the risk is mitigated substantially. We have Evraz and Roman Abramovich to thank for the deal we got.

It's largely a gamblers haven though, looking for the next ASOS

Thanks for that mas99, I'll have a check through, have a look at vanadium redox flow batteries too if you get chance
Edited by: "DarrylJohn" 26th May
Simple answer is safe "investing" is not really worth bothering with now. What is the point of 2% a year with inflation running about that. So unless you want to risk you money the only way to go is premium bonds. You don't get interest but you won't lost your money else and you get a chance of earning via a prize every month.

The stock marker is very high at the moment, it's die at least one more dip and another high before the big dip Brexit will bring. It's a gamble for those who don't control the buying and selling. Oils look on the way up and if USA really do punish Iran expect another 25-50% gain in the price of a barrel of oil.
Yeah you have to have a degree of risk, otherwise you'll not get anywhere.

If you have a substantial amount of cash, where would you put it? Premium bonds are capped aren't they?

My luck is dire in the law of averages that's the only downside.
discozohan7 h, 12 m ago

if you are already invested in aim take a look at VRS given me a nice …if you are already invested in aim take a look at VRS given me a nice little return. by no means I'm telling you to invest in it. do your own research first.i also bought a load of Lloyds RBS and BP when they were cheap. been holding them for years now. BP and Lloyds have recovered and it looks like the worst is behind RBS, just gonna HODL for now hopefully it will all be worth it in the end. got a few hundred in cryptos ....its what im willing to lose in the hope that one or two will surge for a pretty nice profit. good luck

DarrylJohn24 m ago

Yeah you have to have a degree of risk, otherwise you'll not get …Yeah you have to have a degree of risk, otherwise you'll not get anywhere.If you have a substantial amount of cash, where would you put it? Premium bonds are capped aren't they?My luck is dire in the law of averages that's the only downside.


I've got a substantial amount with experts where i can't touch it. I leave it all to sjp.co.uk

I've got a few grand that I play with ...I mentioned a few of the stocks earlier....and a few hundred in crypto....mainly XRP (ripple) and XLM (stellar). I'm a risk taker , for the amount that I have in crypto it's not worth putting in to conventional stocks. if my main crypto takes off it will give returns of 100s %......it's a risk I'm willing to take
DarrylJohn1 h, 59 m ago

Yeah you have to have a degree of risk, otherwise you'll not get …Yeah you have to have a degree of risk, otherwise you'll not get anywhere.If you have a substantial amount of cash, where would you put it? Premium bonds are capped aren't they?My luck is dire in the law of averages that's the only downside.


You're correct about risk - that will give you the biggest potential gains, but also the biggest potential losses.

I have some Premium Bonds, but to be honest I think you'd have a very meagre retirement if you count on them as your main or only investment. Sure they are underwritten by the government, so they are safe, and prizes are tax free. But you'd need above average luck to see a return much better than a bank account. They won't increase in capital value either. I'm not saying don't invest, they may have a role to play as a small part of a diversified portfolio. But they aren't the first thing I would buy, nor would I put most of my money into them.

Property should see a better return over the longer term, but there's clearly more risk as an investment than there is with Premium Bonds. Property (Buy to Let, or Property Development) is a big commitment. Especially if you don't have deep pockets. Other things to consider are;-

• You'll need a large deposit. Or a large loan. Your returns aren't yours until the bank has been repaid.
• You can't hold a buy to let property (that I know of) in an ISA. Therefore the income will be taxable.
• Do you want to take on a second mortgage? You're going to be very highly geared, and vulnerable in a financial downturn.
• How would you feel if the value of your investment drops by about 20% overnight if there's a financial downturn, and you can only exit at a loss? This happened to many in 2008.
• It really isn't as glamorous as they make out on TV. Tenants leave mess that you either clear up yourself, or you pay someone else to do it. There's also maintenance costs to consider, insurance to pay for, agents fees to pay (unless you have time and knowledge to do everything yourself). Can you pay two mortgages if you have spells without a tenant, or a spell when a tenant doesn't pay?
• Your investment isn't liquid, you can only access your money by finding a buyer or by remortgaging.

Property can be a good investment, but it may be worth investing in a property fund either in your pension or a stocks and shares ISA. Certainly you won't need to take on a large debt, and you may not need to sell all of it if you have an unforeseen reason to access some money in a hurry.

Your Help to Buy ISA isn't much use if you already own a house. Likewise the only reasons to have a Lifetime ISA are buying your first house, or saving for retirement. You can't do the first one anymore, and you'll maybe find a pension more effective for the second one.

As always, DYOR, and good luck.
Edited by: "Guzzle" 26th May
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