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    Irish Logic

    An Irishman moves into a tiny hamlet in County Kerry walks into the pub and promptly orders three beers. The bartender raises his eyebrows, but serves the man three beers, which he drinks quietly at a table, alone.

    An hour later, the man has finished the three beers and orders three more. This happens yet again. The next evening the man again orders and drinks three beers at a time, several times. Soon the entire town is whispering about the Man Who Orders Three Beers. Finally, a week later, the bartender broaches the subject on behalf of the town. 'I don't mean to pry, but folks around here are wondering why you always order three beers?'

    'Tis odd, isn't it?' the man replies. 'You see, I have two brothers. One went to America and the other to Australia. We promised each other that we would always order an extra two beers whenever we drank as a way of keeping up the family bond.' The bartender and the whole town were pleased with this answer, and soon the Man Who Orders Three Beers became a local celebrity and source of pride to the hamlet, even to the extent that out-of-towners would come to watch him drink.

    Then, one day, the man comes in and orders only two beers. The bartender pours them with a heavy heart. This continues for the rest of the evening. He orders only two beers. The word flies around town. Prayers are offered for the soul of one of the brothers.

    The next day, the bartender says to the man, 'Folks around here, me first of all, want to offer condolences to you for the death of your brother. You know the two beers and all.'

    The man ponders this for a moment, then replies, 'You'll be happy to hear that my two brothers are alive and well. It's just that I, meself, have decided to give up drinking for Lent.'

    8 Comments

    Very good

    Funny, but inherently racist

    EDIT: Added the following on a later post:

    Liddle ol' me;1997057

    Funny, but inherently racist



    GunnerGraham;1997152

    Get your neck in mate.:oops:



    Ethnic jokes are often aimed at minorities within certain regions, or peoples from neighboring areas. A common ethnic joke format is the "stupid person" joke, where the stock character, who is the butt of the joke, belongs to an ethnic group singled out for abuse. Such jokes are often interchangeable, with the stigmatized group varying from region to region (e.g. the English tell such jokes about the Irish, Canadians about the Newfies). In other ethnic jokes, the targeted ethnic group is one that has historically been associated with the privileged ruling class, as in the "Jan van der Merwe" jokes of South Africa, which make fun of Afrikaners (Jan van der Merwe being a stereotypical Dutch name). (en.wikipedia.org/wik…oke)

    Apols for the reference to wikipedia. I would like to provide references to academic sources on this issue, but I'm guessing you might not understand them :whistling: Anyway, it is worth considering the issue of racist jokes from the perspective of where they are being told, etc. I've seen a few English people here go on the attack against Scottish members due to some 'perceived' attack on Englishness. I can only imagine what the reactions would be to jokes that played on real stereotypes of the English from such people. I know several such jokes but choose not to tell them precisely because I think about and understand the damage that can be done by racist discourse. But then again maybe I should just wind my neck in. ;-)

    Very good

    Liddle ol' me;1997057

    Funny, but inherently racist


    Get your neck in mate.:oops:

    Very funny

    lol, v good

    I liked that !!

    Liddle ol' me;1997057

    Funny, but inherently racist



    GunnerGraham;1997152

    Get your neck in mate.:oops:



    Ethnic jokes are often aimed at minorities within certain regions, or peoples from neighboring areas. A common ethnic joke format is the "stupid person" joke, where the stock character, who is the butt of the joke, belongs to an ethnic group singled out for abuse. Such jokes are often interchangeable, with the stigmatized group varying from region to region (e.g. the English tell such jokes about the Irish, Canadians about the Newfies). In other ethnic jokes, the targeted ethnic group is one that has historically been associated with the privileged ruling class, as in the "Jan van der Merwe" jokes of South Africa, which make fun of Afrikaners (Jan van der Merwe being a stereotypical Dutch name). (en.wikipedia.org/wik…oke)

    Apols for the reference to wikipedia. I would like to provide references to academic sources on this issue, but I'm guessing you might not understand them :whistling: Anyway, it is worth considering the issue of racist jokes from the perspective of where they are being told, etc. I've seen a few English people here go on the attack against Scottish members due to some 'perceived' attack on Englishness. I can only imagine what the reactions would be to jokes that played on real stereotypes of the English from such people. I know several such jokes but choose not to tell them precisely because I think about and understand the damage that can be done by racist discourse. But then again maybe I should just wind my neck in. ;-)
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