Is condenser dryer good?

38
Posted 26th Nov
going to buy one this week as it doesn't require venting hose. is there anything I need to pay attention to, except the price? :-)
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Heat pump are miles better. better on pocket long run and kinder to clothes also doesn’t warm the room up
Yeah, avoid Indesit and Hotpoint.
In terms of ownership, they use a lot of electricity, so try to buy the best Efficiency rating you can afford.
Clean the fluff filter every use.
Some can be hooked up to the drain, which saves emptying the water collector.
Our vented one broke last month. Bought a £199 Indedit condenser dryer from Currys. Garage is cleaner (no fluff) and no moisture issues now. The Indedit has a simple dial to select minutes to dry, found some others were unnecessarily complex (jeans setting!). Water container is at top of machine, so easy to remove. You still have to remove lint from front of drum and once a month rinse condenser that sits in the base panel. £199 was about the most I wanted to spend , so heat pump types were not on our list but are highly rated.
colinsss26/11/2019 23:33

Our vented one broke last month. Bought a £199 Indedit condenser dryer …Our vented one broke last month. Bought a £199 Indedit condenser dryer from Currys. Garage is cleaner (no fluff) and no moisture issues now. The Indedit has a simple dial to select minutes to dry, found some others were unnecessarily complex (jeans setting!). Water container is at top of machine, so easy to remove. You still have to remove lint from front of drum and once a month rinse condenser that sits in the base panel. £199 was about the most I wanted to spend , so heat pump types were not on our list but are highly rated.


Sounds similar to the indesit one I have. Had it for about 3 years and recently the pump went on it.

Was a cheap diy fix and back up in running in no time at all.
the ones we had produce a lot of moisture in the kitchen. they are not great dryers compared to the vented ones and they are more expensive. they can also be noisy. we had the hoover ones so maybe avoid them
Justsuperman26/11/2019 23:11

Heat pump are miles better. better on pocket long run and kinder to …Heat pump are miles better. better on pocket long run and kinder to clothes also doesn’t warm the room up



Another vote for a heat pump dryer here.
I have a Zanussi condenser dryer, bought in 2000 and still going strong, never had any issues with it
I got basically gone from vented hose to condense, on same cheap one thanks to wirlpool, and well I think with dryer is plenty of space in drum for it to dry good, I went from 3kg to 8 kg ,made big difference, and water collection dead easy,I empty every washe,seems to collect fair bit and moisture seems acceptable levels, I have mositure measuring device and Never goes high,, deffo beats leaving door open with the vented one.

only thing I noticed and still hasn't gone, is a smell I never knew, when it is on
Another heat pump advocate here. Yes they're more expensive but they will more than pay for themselves in reduced energy costs over the lifetime of the machine. Not sure my dog is a fan though as she loved lying in front of our old dryer.
Heat pump dryers need to be in an heated room, they won't work properly in a garage for example. They take ages to dry stuff too.
Just swapped our old vented Creda dryer after 15 years of service, 12 of them in the garage. It was still working but needed something bigger to take the output of our 10kg load washer. Replaced with an Indesit B efficiency , best you can get without heat pump, pleased with it so far ( 6 months old). Only cost £138 direct from manufacturer durring eBay 20% off event. I'd only buy a condenser if you can't have a vented one for some reason.
yorkie1227/11/2019 07:39

Heat pump dryers need to be in an heated room, they won't work properly in …Heat pump dryers need to be in an heated room, they won't work properly in a garage for example..


Heat Pump machines use a lower temperature &, hence, take slightly longer when compared with a conventional Condenser or Vented-style machine, but because Heat Pumps are more energy efficient there are greater cost savings. The lower temperatures help with the protection of the load contents. The initial purchase price of a Heat Pump machine is likely to be higher.

Why do you think they need to be in a heated room?
Yes. Ours CV is over 10 years old
fanpages27/11/2019 08:45

Heat Pump machines use a lower temperature &, hence, take slightly longer …Heat Pump machines use a lower temperature &, hence, take slightly longer when compared with a conventional Condenser or Vented-style machine, but because Heat Pumps are more energy efficient there are greater cost savings. The lower temperatures help with the protection of the load contents. The initial purchase price of a Heat Pump machine is likely to be higher.Why do you think they need to be in a heated room?


I did some research on these when replacing ours and I found the information about them not being suitable for un heated rooms then , I'll try and find again. Also many reported their machines took hours to dry clothes , not just slightly longer and clothes didn't feel totally dry. The machine I was considering was 3x more expensive too, so all things considered , I stuck with a conventional one.
fanpages27/11/2019 08:45

Heat Pump machines use a lower temperature &, hence, take slightly longer …Heat Pump machines use a lower temperature &, hence, take slightly longer when compared with a conventional Condenser or Vented-style machine, but because Heat Pumps are more energy efficient there are greater cost savings. The lower temperatures help with the protection of the load contents. The initial purchase price of a Heat Pump machine is likely to be higher.Why do you think they need to be in a heated room?


From AO.com ' Heat pump tumble dryers are very gentle and extremely quiet, they’re also the most energy efficient choice. They work by re-circulating the warm air in the dryer rather than letting it escape, which also means they don’t need a hose. So you can place these tumble dryers anywhere in the home, but avoid placing them in garages and outbuildings as they need to operate within a minimum ambient temperature range.'
appliancesdirect.co.uk/con…ide
yorkie1227/11/2019 09:19

I did some research on these when replacing ours and I found the …I did some research on these when replacing ours and I found the information about them not being suitable for un heated rooms then , I'll try and find again. Also many reported their machines took hours to dry clothes , not just slightly longer and clothes didn't feel totally dry. The machine I was considering was 3x more expensive too, so all things considered , I stuck with a conventional one.


OK. I didn't find that information before I purchased.

My machine is in an unheated kitchen, a few feet from an exterior door. Far from a warm room, especially at the moment.

In this environment a 10kg load of towels straight out of my washing machine takes about two hours to dry completely.
yorkie1227/11/2019 09:33

From AO.com ' Heat pump tumble dryers are very gentle and extremely quiet, …From AO.com ' Heat pump tumble dryers are very gentle and extremely quiet, they’re also the most energy efficient choice. They work by re-circulating the warm air in the dryer rather than letting it escape, which also means they don’t need a hose. So you can place these tumble dryers anywhere in the home, but avoid placing them in garages and outbuildings as they need to operate within a minimum ambient temperature range.'https://www.appliancesdirect.co.uk/content/tumble-dryers-buying-guide


They can be in unheated rooms then. Thanks.
fanpages27/11/2019 09:35

They can be in unheated rooms then. Thanks.


As long as it's not as cold as a Garage , I'm sure I saw a minimum of 10 degrees is best. Our dryer takes 1 hour to dry a full load of towels so yours takes double that . The AO information states they don't need venting so where does the water go?
Edited by: "yorkie12" 27th Nov
yorkie1227/11/2019 09:39

As long as it's not as cold as a Garage , I'm sure I saw a minimum of 10 …As long as it's not as cold as a Garage , I'm sure I saw a minimum of 10 degrees is best. Our dryer takes 1 hour to dry a full load of towels so yours takes double that .



If that is also a 10kg load of towels then it will still do it more efficiently.
fanpages27/11/2019 09:40

If that is also a 10kg load of towels then it will still do it more …If that is also a 10kg load of towels then it will still do it more efficiently.


May be so but it would still be a long time paying me back for the extra investment of over £200 ( cheapest option , some were a few hundred more) . Occasionally you need things quickly too. Wasn't an option for me either as ours needed to be in the Garage. Could some of the efficiancy be due to them pinching heat from the room too?
Edited by: "yorkie12" 27th Nov
yorkie1227/11/2019 09:46

May be so but it would still be a long time paying me back for the extra …May be so but it would still be a long time paying me back for the extra investment of over £200 . Occasionally you need things quickly too.


Maybe for you, but our home has many washing & drying cycles every day so it makes sense for us for the machines to be as efficient as possible.

The Heat Pump machines have quick drying cycles just like more conventional models.

I'm not dismissing your choice as being substandard. Many factors go into the decision to purchase goods like this.
fanpages27/11/2019 09:49

Maybe for you, but our home has many washing & drying cycles every day so …Maybe for you, but our home has many washing & drying cycles every day so it makes sense for us for the machines to be as efficient as possible.The Heat Pump machines have quick drying cycles just like more conventional models.I'm not dismissing your choice as being substandard. Many factors go into the decision to purchase goods like this.


Ours is on about 3 times a week in Winter, being from Yorkshire it isn't allowed on if the weather is good.Lol . If you use them a lot then it's quicker to recoup the extra outlay.
yorkie1227/11/2019 09:46

...Could some of the efficiancy be due to them pinching heat from the room …...Could some of the efficiancy be due to them pinching heat from the room too?


(Just seen your edit)

I can understand why they would not be as efficient in cold(er) environments (such as an unheated garage not connected to the main property) where the air that is recirculated drops in temperature, but they would have to be in a particularly hot/uncomfortable environment in order for that to be a significant factor in being more efficient. If that were the case then you may be more inclined to hang up the contents to dry in the heat rather than needing to use a tumble dryer.

I have an old condenser dryer in an unheated shed (with insulated walls & floor, but not the ceiling) at the bottom of my garden.

That dryer works just fine in that location but, yes, I suspect the heat pump machine would take longer than usual there.
Condenser, HEAT PUMP dryer owner here.

OP, as per others clear the lint trap every time, (then run your fingers around where it sat to get any extra).

Regardless of lint trap it still will pass on lint elsewhere in the machine.. ALL TYPES DO.

So,.... empty the water after EVERY use runs more efficiently as a result in my wifes opinion rather than letting it fill to capacity or even halfway.

Every week or so get on the floor & remove the secondary filter (insist on a second one at point of sale) ..wash one use one.

Periodically check the heat pump fins for clogging, (more lint) use a toothbrush gently to get the moist gunk out & bin.
The fins are delicate, I invested in a fin comb "just in case" I bent them ..a couple of quid from ali-express ..handy tool that drags the gunk.

NB all tumble driers despite lint traps deposit micro dust fibres elsewhere especially from fleeces & dog blankets / cat hair ..mu old zanussi drum (non heat pump) stopped working even though the lint was religiously cleaned as was the vent... I took it apart, there was a sheen of lint crud on it which was causing the drum belt to slip (less grip) against the drum . degreased it all & gave it a spin...worked fine again.

Yes there are optimal minimal temps for the working of heat pumps, however the reality is if its too cold to draw useable heat from the air then there is a small element to top it up, ours is in a conservatory...it works in winter just takes a bit longer, so we tend to time it for the day when temps are up! ..rather than the hearsay further up the thread.
But nope, I wouldn't stick one on a cold cement garage floor as that will affect it to some measurable degree.
if your option is to shove it on a cold floor (slabs of concrete in homes that are older & dont have insulation in that slab at time of pouring will make a home colder, thus a heat pump will need to work harder (losses vs efficiency) but that is also applicable to old regular driers as the floor sucks heat from the machine into the cold slab.
I have ours in a conservatory with a thin thermal camping mat underneath it.
Buy a dehumidifier with a laundry drying setting and dry it on a clothes horse , you then have your dryer and a dehumidifier to keep the humidity in your house at the right level . Best of both worlds .
Another vote here for a heat pump dryer. Replaced an old condenser with a Samsung heat pump one from AO -

ao.com/pro…0CW

It’s fantastic. As a family of 4 with 2 young children it’s in regular use and certainly doesn’t take hours or leave you with damp clothes as someone is suggesting in this post. It’s silent and extremely energy efficient compared to our old condenser. One of the great things about this model is it has a sensor in it which is constantly monitoring the moisture in the drum so will reduce the estimated time of the cycle as the clothes dry.
Mr_Gus27/11/2019 10:06

...So,.... empty the water after EVERY use runs more efficiently as a …...So,.... empty the water after EVERY use runs more efficiently as a result in my wifes opinion rather than letting it fill to capacity or even halfway. Every week or so get on the floor & remove the secondary filter (insist on a second one at point of sale) ..wash one use one...


Why wouldn't you empty the water tank after every run? Surely you would provide the maximum capacity for the dryer to extract moisture on every subsequent run so that the cycle does not pause when the tank is full.

Also, yes, two filters were provided with my machine but "washing" is just a simple case of running tap water over it at the sink. There is no need to swap filters at that time.

The instruction manual does state that the filters & the evaporator are cleaned regularly too.
39136940-WyS8Q.jpg
Mr_Gus27/11/2019 10:06

Condenser, HEAT PUMP dryer owner here.OP, as per others clear the lint …Condenser, HEAT PUMP dryer owner here.OP, as per others clear the lint trap every time, (then run your fingers around where it sat to get any extra).Regardless of lint trap it still will pass on lint elsewhere in the machine.. ALL TYPES DO.So,.... empty the water after EVERY use runs more efficiently as a result in my wifes opinion rather than letting it fill to capacity or even halfway.Every week or so get on the floor & remove the secondary filter (insist on a second one at point of sale) ..wash one use one.Periodically check the heat pump fins for clogging, (more lint) use a toothbrush gently to get the moist gunk out & bin.The fins are delicate, I invested in a fin comb "just in case" I bent them ..a couple of quid from ali-express ..handy tool that drags the gunk.NB all tumble driers despite lint traps deposit micro dust fibres elsewhere especially from fleeces & dog blankets / cat hair ..mu old zanussi drum (non heat pump) stopped working even though the lint was religiously cleaned as was the vent... I took it apart, there was a sheen of lint crud on it which was causing the drum belt to slip (less grip) against the drum . degreased it all & gave it a spin...worked fine again.Yes there are optimal minimal temps for the working of heat pumps, however the reality is if its too cold to draw useable heat from the air then there is a small element to top it up, ours is in a conservatory...it works in winter just takes a bit longer, so we tend to time it for the day when temps are up! ..rather than the hearsay further up the thread.But nope, I wouldn't stick one on a cold cement garage floor as that will affect it to some measurable degree.if your option is to shove it on a cold floor (slabs of concrete in homes that are older & dont have insulation in that slab at time of pouring will make a home colder, thus a heat pump will need to work harder (losses vs efficiency) but that is also applicable to old regular driers as the floor sucks heat from the machine into the cold slab.I have ours in a conservatory with a thin thermal camping mat underneath it.


Ours is in the dining room near black door do you think that's a good place to put it? tbf it's the only place we can
fanpages27/11/2019 10:35

Why wouldn't you empty the water tank after every run? Surely you would …Why wouldn't you empty the water tank after every run? Surely you would provide the maximum capacity for the dryer to extract moisture on every subsequent run so that the cycle does not pause when the tank is full.Also, yes, two filters were provided with my machine but "washing" is just a simple case of running tap water over it at the sink. There is no need to swap filters at that time.The instruction manual does state that the filters & the evaporator are cleaned regularly too.


I actually did say stress to empty the water every time, but folk will let it collect affecting the immediate moisture lading, just like some folk leave filters to clog.

As I also inferred filters gather detritus at different rates depending on the washload & subsequent drying cycle, just like using a bit of fabric conditioner can help shift far more pet hair detritus in the washer IF you use it, ..if not then there is more for the drier to collect in nooks & crannies.

However, conditioner should not be used on fleeces generally ..it affects the material, but is handy for unclogging "vet bedding"
Justsuperman27/11/2019 10:37

[Image] Ours is in the dining room near black door do you think that's a …[Image] Ours is in the dining room near black door do you think that's a good place to put it? tbf it's the only place we can


you answered your own question.
Likely you have the place warmer than I do anyway. ...scrutinise from a wider angle of operation, ...if there is enough air passageway a thin covering of foil faced celotex or similar will help with the temps if its an outside wall to bounce back a bit more heat, remember heat pumps draw heat from the air leaving the area cooler (in the main) so a warmer room to start with helps the process of drying, ..maybe monitor with a few well placed thermometor & humidity sensors & see whats what seasonally.
Mr_Gus27/11/2019 11:09

you answered your own question.Likely you have the place warmer than I do …you answered your own question.Likely you have the place warmer than I do anyway. ...scrutinise from a wider angle of operation, ...if there is enough air passageway a thin covering of foil faced celotex or similar will help with the temps if its an outside wall to bounce back a bit more heat, remember heat pumps draw heat from the air leaving the area cooler (in the main) so a warmer room to start with helps the process of drying, ..maybe monitor with a few well placed thermometor & humidity sensors & see whats what seasonally.


Thank you, also I normally use the Dyson to vac the filters with the small brushes they have is that okay for that use? or will it damage the filters netting always worry about it. I normally change the water tank after 2 cycles and clean the filters after every cycle
Mr_Gus27/11/2019 10:06

..So,.... empty the water after EVERY use runs more efficiently as a …..So,.... empty the water after EVERY use runs more efficiently as a result in my wifes opinion rather than letting it fill to capacity or even halfway. Every week or so get on the floor & remove the secondary filter (insist on a second one at point of sale) ..wash one use one...



fanpages27/11/2019 10:35

Why wouldn't you empty the water tank after every run? Surely you would …Why wouldn't you empty the water tank after every run? Surely you would provide the maximum capacity for the dryer to extract moisture on every subsequent run so that the cycle does not pause when the tank is full.Also, yes, two filters were provided with my machine but "washing" is just a simple case of running tap water over it at the sink. There is no need to swap filters at that time.The instruction manual does state that the filters & the evaporator are cleaned regularly too.



Mr_Gus27/11/2019 11:04

I actually did say stress to empty the water every time, but folk will let …I actually did say stress to empty the water every time, but folk will let it collect affecting the immediate moisture lading, just like some folk leave filters to clog.As I also inferred filters gather detritus at different rates depending on the washload & subsequent drying cycle, just like using a bit of fabric conditioner can help shift far more pet hair detritus in the washer IF you use it, ..if not then there is more for the drier to collect in nooks & crannies.However, conditioner should not be used on fleeces generally ..it affects the material, but is handy for unclogging "vet bedding"


Oh, with the lack of punctuation in that follow-on sentence I read it is as your wife insisted; not that it was your preference. OK.

I have not used fabric conditioner for fifteen years or more (even when we had three dogs). I don't find it an essential part of a wash cycle at all.
Fanpages, the info is for all & sundry so I tend to write "generally"

Lack of punctuation is part forgetful, part haste, mostly brain injury though, combined with having to force the brain somewhat to co-operate with my worst functioning side to write, ..plus lately deteriorating left eye, ..all head injury related rather than being feckless / incompetent.

In terms of the conditioner, it is something lots of folk tend to put in regardless (ie, without thinking) ..which if folk care about fleeces the rule of thumb is not to use it for 3 washes prior to a fleece load, ..however vet bedding clumps without it over time even holey it is a good thermal layer for animals, ...our boxers tend to proverbially cane it, coarse hair.

From the mouths (sic) of Polartec...

"CAN I USE FABRIC SOFTENERS ON POLARTEC® FABRICS TO REDUCE STATIC?The addition of fabric softeners affects the function of the water repellent applied to some Polartec® fabrics but often diminishes the static problem. There are various brands of softeners with different chemistries and some will help static at the expense of water repellency, and others will have no effect on either. No softener will damage the basic fabric and will come off in the next wash. We do not recommend using fabric softeners on Polartec® Power Dry® or Polartec® Power Stretch® because it may inhibit wicking and drying properties".





NB the best way to explain the efficiency of heat pump (mini ASHP in essence) is to look at C.O.P. / COP ratings as the temperature peaks & troughs graph according to design "stated efficiency" n' all that but are not really advertised by white goods manufacturers & sellers.
As cop ratings may rely on thermal efficiency (insulation of enclosure) & seasonable variables it is likely too much for all but the most determined & won't make you any friends down the pub with the exception of renewables engineers.

A bit like when you try & explain why the pub landlord shouldn't really put a coal & wood mix on the fire..

..Ta tar.
Edited by: "Mr_Gus" 27th Nov
Just been reading a guide to Tumble Dryers by the Telegraph and they say on average it takes over 11 years to recoup the extra cost of a Heatpump dryer.

telegraph.co.uk/int…s1/
yorkie1227/11/2019 14:09

Just been reading a guide to Tumble Dryers by the Telegraph and they say …Just been reading a guide to Tumble Dryers by the Telegraph and they say on average it takes over 11 years to recoup the extra cost of a Heatpump dryer. https://www.telegraph.co.uk/interiors/home/best-tumble-dryers1/


That's not a guide to tumble dryers though, its a thinly veiled excuse for advertising & pay links... when a "journalist" starts with phrases like "special technology" (ie a fricking heat pump) they aren't worth their salt
I have a heat pump dryer, I got it for a decent price at the time.

They are not worth 3x the price, you will likely never recoup the additional cost in the average life of the machine.
I’ve been using, condensers for years. Mine also will turn off and activate a light when the water needs emptying. But think it’s just a case of what you prefer, a decent one will dry your washing wether it’s vented or condensed.
Justsuperman27/11/2019 11:14

Thank you, also I normally use the Dyson to vac the filters with the small …Thank you, also I normally use the Dyson to vac the filters with the small brushes they have is that okay for that use? or will it damage the filters netting always worry about it. I normally change the water tank after 2 cycles and clean the filters after every cycle


I use a cheap new toothbrush or the comb / both.
Basically the head of the dyson will obscure the vent & likely dent fins (even when careful) ..so try it, just be really aware that you are wanting to stroke the fins not bash them
Justsuperman26/11/2019 23:11

Heat pump are miles better. better on pocket long run and kinder to …Heat pump are miles better. better on pocket long run and kinder to clothes also doesn’t warm the room up


Really thanks. But it looks like that heat pumps are more expensive than condenser ones.
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