Is it possible to have water usage (taps, baths, toilets, etc) on two floors without loss in a terraced house?

10
Posted 10th JanEdited by:"rofldinho"
I have zero knowledge of plumbing, so apologies if this is a stupid question. We are currently getting a bathroom refitted so wanted to ask about the possibility of a quality of life upgrade. This is a standard terraced house with the water connection being on the street outside and a combi boiler.

Is it possible and easy to have two floors be able to use water without negatively affecting the other? So for example if someone is using the shower upstairs and another person flushes the toilet downstairs, the (mains combi boiler connected) shower upstairs will lose alot of water pressure because the toilet cistern is reflling, and their nice temperature shower will go very weak leading to alot of annoyance. Can this be prevented so the upstairs shower is unaffected by the water usage downstairs?

I know in offices and hotels this isn't a problem presumably because they have large or additional supplies from the external pipes, but for an ordinary home is it easy to fix this with some sort of device (pump or something), or is it a massive job with complicated planning permission?

Thanks for any replies.
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You could basically feed your shower from a heat store (vented/unvented cylinder) like larger homes do. Your plumber would be able to help you out more, on a smaller house it’s not that inconvenient so that’s why they don’t fit them. Larger house, multiple bathrooms and showers it becomes necessary there’s nothing to stop you getting one fitted though other than space
Install a pump/mega shower for the shower upstairs so there is a consistent pressure.
We're in a terraced house and when someone is in the shower and someone else flushes the toilet there is no difference in water pressure in the shower. The inky difference is that it will get hotter for a minute or so (because the cold water is diverted elsewhere). We have an up and downstairs bathroom btw. Someone can also wash up downstairs while someone has a shower and it doesn't affect the water pressure of the shower
What you describe only happens when the diameter of the pipes is too small and/or they are clogged.
Buckyball10/01/2020 09:20

What you describe only happens when the diameter of the pipes is too small …What you describe only happens when the diameter of the pipes is too small and/or they are clogged.


Are you sure?
What is you're pressure in bars like now?
esar10/01/2020 10:37

What is you're pressure in bars like now?


1.2
esar13/01/2020 20:58

A pump might help, but not cheap …A pump might help, but not cheap https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fURajD17BBQ



You cannot pump a combi boiler & neither can you pump directly from the mains. You would need to install an unvented pressurised system or install a holding tank in the loft & pump or just get the flow from there.
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