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    Is it safe to eat RICOTTA cheese and MOZERELLA cheese when pregnant?

    Ate this at tea time, in a stuffed pasta, and I am 8 weeks pregnant, after eating it I was like OMG is it a soft cheese?

    10 Comments

    Banned

    moderation ?

    You are fine with mozerella not sure abour ricotta

    Cheese is an important source of protein and calcium for pregnant women but certain kinds do need to be avoided. This is because some cheeses are more inclined to allow growth of bacteria, such as listeria, which can harm your unborn child.

    Pregnant women are advised not to eat:

    • soft, mould-ripened cheeses, such as Brie or Camembert
    • blue-veined cheeses, such as Danish Blue and Stilton

    These cheeses are moister and less acidic than other cheeses, providing a perfect environment for bacteria to grow. However, thorough cooking should kill any listeria, so it should be safe to eat these cheeses in cooked food. Before you eat it, though, make sure it has been properly cooked and is piping hot all the way through.

    In healthy adults, infection with listeria can cause a short-lived flu-like illness. Pregnant women, however, can be hit harder by listeria, for the same reason you are more susceptible to everything during pregnancy: your immune system isn't working as well.

    Symptoms usually develop several weeks after exposure to the bacteria, which can make it hard to pinpoint exactly which food made you sick. Symptoms may include fever, chills, muscle aches and back pain. Doctors diagnose listeria infection by testing your blood. Antibiotics will treat the infection. Newborns can also be tested and treated.

    Listeria infection in pregnant women is very rare in the UK, only affecting about one in 25,000 pregnancies. Provided you avoid foods with a high risk, you are very unlikely to be affected.

    All hard cheeses are generally considered safe to eat. The Food Standards Agency states that listeria is present in these cheeses in extremely low numbers and they are therefore not considered a risk during pregnancy.

    Cheeses which are SAFE to eat in pregnancy

    Hard cheeses:
    Austrian smoked, Babybel, Caerphilly, Cheddar, Cheshire, Derby, Double Gloucester, Edam, Emmental, English goat's cheddar, feta, Gouda, Gruyere, Halloumi, Havarti, Jarlsberg, Lancashire, Manchego, Orkney, paneer, Parmesan, Pecorino (hard), Provolone, Red Leicester.

    Soft and processed cheeses:
    Boursin, cottage cheese, cream cheese, feta, goat's cheese without a white rind, mascarpone, mozzarella, Philadelphia, processed cheese (such as cheese spread), Quark, ricotta.

    Yoghurts (all varieties), probiotic drinks, fromage frais, soured cream and crème fraîche - any variety, including natural, flavoured and biologically active - are all safe to eat.

    Cheeses to AVOID in pregnancy

    Mould-ripened soft cheeses:
    Brie, Blue Brie, Cambozola, Camembert, Chaumes, chèvre (goats cheese with a white rind), Pont L'Eveque, Taleggio, Vacherin-Fribourgeois

    Blue-veined cheeses:
    Bergader, Bleu d'Auvergne, Blue Wensleydale, Shropshire Blue, Danish Blue, Dolcelatte, Gorgonzola, Roncal, Roquefort, Stilton, tomme, Wensleydale (blue).

    Soft, unpasteurised cheese, including goat and sheep's cheeses:
    Chabichou, Pyramide, Torta del Cesar.

    Cheeses which are SAFE to eat in pregnancy
    Soft and processed cheeses:
    Boursin, cottage cheese, cream cheese, feta, goat's cheese without a white rind, mascarpone, mozzarella, Philadelphia, processed cheese (such as cheese spread), Quark, ricotta.


    found that on the internet youre safee :thumbsup:

    Banned

    black gerbil1;5760098

    Cheese is an important source of protein and calcium for pregnant women … Cheese is an important source of protein and calcium for pregnant women but certain kinds do need to be avoided. This is because some cheeses are more inclined to allow growth of bacteria, such as listeria, which can harm your unborn child.Pregnant women are advised not to eat:• soft, mould-ripened cheeses, such as Brie or Camembert• blue-veined cheeses, such as Danish Blue and StiltonThese cheeses are moister and less acidic than other cheeses, providing a perfect environment for bacteria to grow. However, thorough cooking should kill any listeria, so it should be safe to eat these cheeses in cooked food. Before you eat it, though, make sure it has been properly cooked and is piping hot all the way through.In healthy adults, infection with listeria can cause a short-lived flu-like illness. Pregnant women, however, can be hit harder by listeria, for the same reason you are more susceptible to everything during pregnancy: your immune system isn't working as well.Symptoms usually develop several weeks after exposure to the bacteria, which can make it hard to pinpoint exactly which food made you sick. Symptoms may include fever, chills, muscle aches and back pain. Doctors diagnose listeria infection by testing your blood. Antibiotics will treat the infection. Newborns can also be tested and treated.Listeria infection in pregnant women is very rare in the UK, only affecting about one in 25,000 pregnancies. Provided you avoid foods with a high risk, you are very unlikely to be affected.All hard cheeses are generally considered safe to eat. The Food Standards Agency states that listeria is present in these cheeses in extremely low numbers and they are therefore not considered a risk during pregnancy.Cheeses which are SAFE to eat in pregnancyHard cheeses:Austrian smoked, Babybel, Caerphilly, Cheddar, Cheshire, Derby, Double Gloucester, Edam, Emmental, English goat's cheddar, feta, Gouda, Gruyere, Halloumi, Havarti, Jarlsberg, Lancashire, Manchego, Orkney, paneer, Parmesan, Pecorino (hard), Provolone, Red Leicester.Soft and processed cheeses:Boursin, cottage cheese, cream cheese, feta, goat's cheese without a white rind, mascarpone, mozzarella, Philadelphia, processed cheese (such as cheese spread), Quark, ricotta.Yoghurts (all varieties), probiotic drinks, fromage frais, soured cream and crème fraîche - any variety, including natural, flavoured and biologically active - are all safe to eat.Cheeses to AVOID in pregnancyMould-ripened soft cheeses:Brie, Blue Brie, Cambozola, Camembert, Chaumes, chèvre (goats cheese with a white rind), Pont L'Eveque, Taleggio, Vacherin-FribourgeoisBlue-veined cheeses:Bergader, Bleu d'Auvergne, Blue Wensleydale, Shropshire Blue, Danish Blue, Dolcelatte, Gorgonzola, Roncal, Roquefort, Stilton, tomme, Wensleydale (blue).Soft, unpasteurised cheese, including goat and sheep's cheeses:Chabichou, Pyramide, Torta del Cesar.




    Power Cut and paste :thumbsup:

    Original Poster

    black gerbil1;5760098

    Cheese is an important source of protein and calcium for pregnant women … Cheese is an important source of protein and calcium for pregnant women but certain kinds do need to be avoided. This is because some cheeses are more inclined to allow growth of bacteria, such as listeria, which can harm your unborn child.Pregnant women are advised not to eat:• soft, mould-ripened cheeses, such as Brie or Camembert• blue-veined cheeses, such as Danish Blue and StiltonThese cheeses are moister and less acidic than other cheeses, providing a perfect environment for bacteria to grow. However, thorough cooking should kill any listeria, so it should be safe to eat these cheeses in cooked food. Before you eat it, though, make sure it has been properly cooked and is piping hot all the way through.In healthy adults, infection with listeria can cause a short-lived flu-like illness. Pregnant women, however, can be hit harder by listeria, for the same reason you are more susceptible to everything during pregnancy: your immune system isn't working as well.Symptoms usually develop several weeks after exposure to the bacteria, which can make it hard to pinpoint exactly which food made you sick. Symptoms may include fever, chills, muscle aches and back pain. Doctors diagnose listeria infection by testing your blood. Antibiotics will treat the infection. Newborns can also be tested and treated.Listeria infection in pregnant women is very rare in the UK, only affecting about one in 25,000 pregnancies. Provided you avoid foods with a high risk, you are very unlikely to be affected.All hard cheeses are generally considered safe to eat. The Food Standards Agency states that listeria is present in these cheeses in extremely low numbers and they are therefore not considered a risk during pregnancy.Cheeses which are SAFE to eat in pregnancyHard cheeses:Austrian smoked, Babybel, Caerphilly, Cheddar, Cheshire, Derby, Double Gloucester, Edam, Emmental, English goat's cheddar, feta, Gouda, Gruyere, Halloumi, Havarti, Jarlsberg, Lancashire, Manchego, Orkney, paneer, Parmesan, Pecorino (hard), Provolone, Red Leicester.Soft and processed cheeses:Boursin, cottage cheese, cream cheese, feta, goat's cheese without a white rind, mascarpone, mozzarella, Philadelphia, processed cheese (such as cheese spread), Quark, ricotta.Yoghurts (all varieties), probiotic drinks, fromage frais, soured cream and crème fraîche - any variety, including natural, flavoured and biologically active - are all safe to eat.Cheeses to AVOID in pregnancyMould-ripened soft cheeses:Brie, Blue Brie, Cambozola, Camembert, Chaumes, chèvre (goats cheese with a white rind), Pont L'Eveque, Taleggio, Vacherin-FribourgeoisBlue-veined cheeses:Bergader, Bleu d'Auvergne, Blue Wensleydale, Shropshire Blue, Danish Blue, Dolcelatte, Gorgonzola, Roncal, Roquefort, Stilton, tomme, Wensleydale (blue).Soft, unpasteurised cheese, including goat and sheep's cheeses:Chabichou, Pyramide, Torta del Cesar.



    Thanks

    black gerbil1;5760098

    Cheese is an important source of protein and calcium for pregnant women … Cheese is an important source of protein and calcium for pregnant women but certain kinds do need to be avoided. This is because some cheeses are more inclined to allow growth of bacteria, such as listeria, which can harm your unborn child.Pregnant women are advised not to eat:• soft, mould-ripened cheeses, such as Brie or Camembert• blue-veined cheeses, such as Danish Blue and StiltonThese cheeses are moister and less acidic than other cheeses, providing a perfect environment for bacteria to grow. However, thorough cooking should kill any listeria, so it should be safe to eat these cheeses in cooked food. Before you eat it, though, make sure it has been properly cooked and is piping hot all the way through.In healthy adults, infection with listeria can cause a short-lived flu-like illness. Pregnant women, however, can be hit harder by listeria, for the same reason you are more susceptible to everything during pregnancy: your immune system isn't working as well.Symptoms usually develop several weeks after exposure to the bacteria, which can make it hard to pinpoint exactly which food made you sick. Symptoms may include fever, chills, muscle aches and back pain. Doctors diagnose listeria infection by testing your blood. Antibiotics will treat the infection. Newborns can also be tested and treated.Listeria infection in pregnant women is very rare in the UK, only affecting about one in 25,000 pregnancies. Provided you avoid foods with a high risk, you are very unlikely to be affected.All hard cheeses are generally considered safe to eat. The Food Standards Agency states that listeria is present in these cheeses in extremely low numbers and they are therefore not considered a risk during pregnancy.Cheeses which are SAFE to eat in pregnancyHard cheeses:Austrian smoked, Babybel, Caerphilly, Cheddar, Cheshire, Derby, Double Gloucester, Edam, Emmental, English goat's cheddar, feta, Gouda, Gruyere, Halloumi, Havarti, Jarlsberg, Lancashire, Manchego, Orkney, paneer, Parmesan, Pecorino (hard), Provolone, Red Leicester.Soft and processed cheeses:Boursin, cottage cheese, cream cheese, feta, goat's cheese without a white rind, mascarpone, mozzarella, Philadelphia, processed cheese (such as cheese spread), Quark, ricotta.Yoghurts (all varieties), probiotic drinks, fromage frais, soured cream and crème fraîche - any variety, including natural, flavoured and biologically active - are all safe to eat.Cheeses to AVOID in pregnancyMould-ripened soft cheeses:Brie, Blue Brie, Cambozola, Camembert, Chaumes, chèvre (goats cheese with a white rind), Pont L'Eveque, Taleggio, Vacherin-FribourgeoisBlue-veined cheeses:Bergader, Bleu d'Auvergne, Blue Wensleydale, Shropshire Blue, Danish Blue, Dolcelatte, Gorgonzola, Roncal, Roquefort, Stilton, tomme, Wensleydale (blue).Soft, unpasteurised cheese, including goat and sheep's cheeses:Chabichou, Pyramide, Torta del Cesar.



    haha i found that but shortened it sorry first one in google

    Usually if pasteurised they fine,same with other dairy products.

    Original Poster

    aah96;5760123

    Cheeses which are SAFE to eat in pregnancySoft and processed … Cheeses which are SAFE to eat in pregnancySoft and processed cheeses:Boursin, cottage cheese, cream cheese, feta, goat's cheese without a white rind, mascarpone, mozzarella, Philadelphia, processed cheese (such as cheese spread), Quark, ricotta.found that on the internet youre safee :thumbsup:



    Thanks :thumbsup:

    In my pregnancy notes it says to avoid peanuts,think this probably more to do with allergies in family,and to avoid liver or liver products. Avoid excessive caffiene too.
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