Groups
    EXPIRED

    Is it worth starting a blu ray collection

    I've recently bought a blu ray player and was wondering if it was worth it to buy blu rays anymore? With digital media being cheaper and less cluttering. However I like having the physical disk so I can be certain it is mine and it's not gonna go away if I somehow loose my account or the service shuts down. Also can blu rays do 4K? Or will a new disk format come out to replace blu rays?

    22 Comments

    I cant imagine a new disk format now since digital downloads have taken over everything.

    Ive got several bluray movies but they just gather dust now. Digital is the way forward and physical media will be a thing of the past soon

    Digital is not the way forward. With digital you own absolutely nothing. you don't get any of the special features. and the quality of bluray is still far superior to anything you'll get digitally.

    In terms of 4K, actual 4K blurays are rumoured to be coming out next year. But you wouldn't have to rebuy your whole collection again.

    So yeah, it's definately worth starting a collection if your a real fan of movies ;-)

    physical copies can be sold on more easily than cloud owned ones.

    Bluray is just storage media. CD - DVD - BD. It's the compression and video audio standard that changes. AVC is being replaced with HEVC which gives better compression. Not sure if blurays of the new 4k standard will backward compatible with the older system much like 3D on older none 3D players.

    The standards to look out for are h .264 & h.265

    I bought a cd hold all and chucked all the cases. Saves on space. These were for DVDs but same principle.

    kester76

    Bluray is just storage media. CD - DVD - BD. It's the compression and … Bluray is just storage media. CD - DVD - BD. It's the compression and video audio standard that changes. AVC is being replaced with HEVC which gives better compression. Not sure if blurays of the new 4k standard will backward compatible with the older system much like 3D on older none 3D players.The standards to look out for are h .264 & h.265



    What has all that got to do with starting a blu-ray collection?

    joxeruk2000

    I bought a cd hold all and chucked all the cases. Saves on space. These … I bought a cd hold all and chucked all the cases. Saves on space. These were for DVDs but same principle.

    I bought a hard drive and chucked away all the CD's, DVD's, cases, folders, picture books, shelves etc etc

    4K are already out now. I have a few 4K blu ray discs and they play fine on a standard player.

    amazon.co.uk/s/r…182

    blu ray all the way cant be bothered with digital could get deleted lost etc.

    Both digital and physical for me. For the films I am really a fan of it's Blu Ray, for others i'm not so bothered about it's digital. Saying that though, if I can buy the blu-ray for 'about' the same price I will always get a disc. You can legally rip DVDs & Blu Rays that you own now as well.

    I think in the near future you won't be owning any films or media, you'll just subscribe to them. They'll live in the cloud and we'll watch them on demand.

    1. Space considerations. Once you get to 300 or 2,000, they'll take up a lot of space.
    2. Disk damage and other issues.
    3. Cost. Unless you buy blu rays of old things when on special offer, you'll get the £££ ripped out of you. New films are very expensive and depreciate so much so quickly. As a collector, every other month you'll be buying the special limited edition exclusive artwork director edition of goodfellas with 8 seconds of previously unseen footage for £35. As a collector, sometimes it will be hard to say no. As a collector, you'll have to take a punt at full price retail because you don't know if it's truly limited or whether you're being hoodwinked by a marketing ploy.....either way, you don't want to be paying £500 on eBay tomorrow. (incidentally, some people use this argument to justify their piracy, and as a former collector, I fully understand this stance.)
    4. Format issues. The creative arts industry is not committed or tied in to any format. Blu ray will soon (e.g. 10 years) become a legacy format just like CDs, DVDs, VHS, audio cassette etc. Even if it stayed around, most devices these days don't use optical media so getting 10 films onto your phone to keep the kids happy on the plane would be a headache. Many people tried to build a half decent DVD collection a decade or so ago when they were being sold the concept by the industry, and where are those disks now? On zoverstocks for £1.49, in the loft gathering dust or on the bedside table propping up a cup of coffee.
    5. With streaming options such as Netflix, you can have most of what you want at the touch of a button for a decade for the price of about 30 new blu-rays. If they don't have HD yet, they soon will do. Plenty more choice, more flexibility, moves with the times etc.
    6. (and probably the most important) if you haven't started a collection yet, you may not be so driven and obsessive that you will amass a grand collection. You've got to ask yourself what you're collecting for. Collectors often get really nerdy about their chosen subject, spend a lot of time, money and effort on it, often just to impress each other, and tend not to even open their most prized scoops.

    DennisG

    1. Space considerations. Once you get to 300 or 2,000, they'll take up a … 1. Space considerations. Once you get to 300 or 2,000, they'll take up a lot of space.2. Disk damage and other issues.3. Cost. Unless you buy blu rays of old things when on special offer, you'll get the £££ ripped out of you. New films are very expensive and depreciate so much so quickly. As a collector, every other month you'll be buying the special limited edition exclusive artwork director edition of goodfellas with 8 seconds of previously unseen footage for £35. As a collector, sometimes it will be hard to say no. As a collector, you'll have to take a punt at full price retail because you don't know if it's truly limited or whether you're being hoodwinked by a marketing ploy.....either way, you don't want to be paying £500 on eBay tomorrow. (incidentally, some people use this argument to justify their piracy, and as a former collector, I fully understand this stance.)4. Format issues. The creative arts industry is not committed or tied in to any format. Blu ray will soon (e.g. 10 years) become a legacy format just like CDs, DVDs, VHS, audio cassette etc. Even if it stayed around, most devices these days don't use optical media so getting 10 films onto your phone to keep the kids happy on the plane would be a headache. Many people tried to build a half decent DVD collection a decade or so ago when they were being sold the concept by the industry, and where are those disks now? On zoverstocks for £1.49, in the loft gathering dust or on the bedside table propping up a cup of coffee.5. With streaming options such as Netflix, you can have most of what you want at the touch of a button for a decade for the price of about 30 new blu-rays. If they don't have HD yet, they soon will do. Plenty more choice, more flexibility, moves with the times etc.6. (and probably the most important) if you haven't started a collection yet, you may not be so driven and obsessive that you will amass a grand collection. You've got to ask yourself what you're collecting for. Collectors often get really nerdy about their chosen subject, spend a lot of time, money and effort on it, often just to impress each other, and tend not to even open their most prized scoops.



    Wow that's a hardcore answer. How do you feel about digital books? I'm not keen myself prefer a paper copy. Sometimes an audio book. Don't tend to read books again once I've read them. (With the exemption of reading story's to kids) and there's always the option to buy secondhand.

    I'm a serial archivist so I keep all my books.
    I'm also (according to a work I discovered this week) a tsundoku (I buy books I never read) however I like having them available as and when I get time. The main problem here again is space.

    When I first bought a Kindle, it was great to be able to take a selection of books with me, built-in reading light and a few other advantages over things that annoyed me about books, but over time I've found I've gravitated back towards print books.
    I also tend to read non-fiction and highlight things I want to reference back to. I like the feel of a read and highlighted/annotated book far more than a file of 'clippings' on the kindle. 2nd hand books are dirt cheap (there's a guy on eBay who sells them for 99p & £10 postage flat rate - so you can get 200 books for £208). There's also something about holding a book - each one is unique in its size, layout, typeface etc and the Kindle strips that away.
    I still think committed readers will find room for a kindle in their lives, but many may overwhelmingly prefer the feel of a book.
    I personally like the physical product with most things - music, books, games etc, however as the majority of shows I want aren't available commercially (e.g. documentaries), or in this country (region locking annoys me a lot, as do import costs and staggered releases across markets), and because I've physically run out of room and money, digital has been the choice for me. Many shows I like are available on demand on their original channel (4OD or BBC), other shows are available via netflix or elsewhere.
    Edited by: "DennisG" 17th Dec 2014

    rev6

    What has all that got to do with starting a blu-ray collection?



    Its to do with the fact that there are very few dead optical formats i.e. laser disc and dvd hd. blurays arent going anywhere fast and are a good storage medium. with h.265 a 4k film could fit on a bluray. Bluray is better than digital downloads due to the menus, audio formats and picture quality. Digital is just more portable.

    Peegy

    4K are already out now. I have a few 4K blu ray discs and they play fine … 4K are already out now. I have a few 4K blu ray discs and they play fine on a standard player.http://www.amazon.co.uk/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_i_1_2?url=search-alias%3Ddvd&field-keywords=4k%20blu%20ray%20movies&sprefix=4K%2Cdvd%2C182


    Its mastered from a 4K source but is only 1080p. The do have higher bitrate than standard 1080p though.

    Check out my blu Ray f/s threads

    kester76

    Its to do with the fact that there are very few dead optical formats i.e. … Its to do with the fact that there are very few dead optical formats i.e. laser disc and dvd hd. blurays arent going anywhere fast and are a good storage medium. with h.265 a 4k film could fit on a bluray. Bluray is better than digital downloads due to the menus, audio formats and picture quality. Digital is just more portable.



    I've never purchased a digital version of a blu-ray before, but if there's extra compression involved, etc, then sure I'd agree that the disc version is better. I can't imagine them letting you download 40/50GB for a single movie.
    Edited by: "rev6" 17th Dec 2014

    DennisG

    1. Space considerations. Once you get to 300 or 2,000, they'll take up a … 1. Space considerations. Once you get to 300 or 2,000, they'll take up a lot of space.2. Disk damage and other issues.3. Cost. Unless you buy blu rays of old things when on special offer, you'll get the £££ ripped out of you. New films are very expensive and depreciate so much so quickly. As a collector, every other month you'll be buying the special limited edition exclusive artwork director edition of goodfellas with 8 seconds of previously unseen footage for £35. As a collector, sometimes it will be hard to say no. As a collector, you'll have to take a punt at full price retail because you don't know if it's truly limited or whether you're being hoodwinked by a marketing ploy.....either way, you don't want to be paying £500 on eBay tomorrow. (incidentally, some people use this argument to justify their piracy, and as a former collector, I fully understand this stance.)4. Format issues. The creative arts industry is not committed or tied in to any format. Blu ray will soon (e.g. 10 years) become a legacy format just like CDs, DVDs, VHS, audio cassette etc. Even if it stayed around, most devices these days don't use optical media so getting 10 films onto your phone to keep the kids happy on the plane would be a headache. Many people tried to build a half decent DVD collection a decade or so ago when they were being sold the concept by the industry, and where are those disks now? On zoverstocks for £1.49, in the loft gathering dust or on the bedside table propping up a cup of coffee.5. With streaming options such as Netflix, you can have most of what you want at the touch of a button for a decade for the price of about 30 new blu-rays. If they don't have HD yet, they soon will do. Plenty more choice, more flexibility, moves with the times etc.6. (and probably the most important) if you haven't started a collection yet, you may not be so driven and obsessive that you will amass a grand collection. You've got to ask yourself what you're collecting for. Collectors often get really nerdy about their chosen subject, spend a lot of time, money and effort on it, often just to impress each other, and tend not to even open their most prized scoops.


    Great answer.

    rev6

    I've never purchased a digital version of a blu-ray before, but if … I've never purchased a digital version of a blu-ray before, but if there's extra compression involved, etc, then sure I'd agree that the disc version is better. I can't imagine them letting you download 40/50GB for a single movie.


    You get Digital copy from either iTunes or UV from quite a few Bluray releases. With h.265 you should be able to get it down to at least half the storage.

    kester76

    You get Digital copy from either iTunes or UV from quite a few Bluray … You get Digital copy from either iTunes or UV from quite a few Bluray releases. With h.265 you should be able to get it down to at least half the storage.



    Depends on the quality. H.265 isn't exactly half the storage space of H.264.
    Edited by: "rev6" 17th Dec 2014

    rev6

    Depends on the quality. H.265 isn't exactly half the storage space of … Depends on the quality. H.265 isn't exactly half the storage space of H.264.



    Close enough but it all depends on how complex the video stream is cnet.com/new…ia/ 50GB -> 66GB -> 100GB Discs
    Post a comment
    Avatar
    @
      Text
      Top Discussions
      1. 3x Now TV Sky Sports Day Passes to Giveaway1918
      2. So Brexit isn't going how a lot of Brexiters thought it would30124
      3. The HUKD Student Discount code sharing thread (most codes on Unidays are si…7251370
      4. 75% off Sky TV for existing customers. Only works when you call the specifi…17876389

      See more discussions