Is the power connector (12pins) in a 1.1 xbox an AT Power supply?

I have noticed that when I looked inside my XBOX just the power connector is an AT 1 (12 pins) as well as the motherboard and I was wondering what the wattage was as I could possibly stick the motherboard from that 1998 computer in (provided I get rid of the 80mm fan as the orignal xbox mothwerboard has been shaped round it.

The motherboard looks virtually the same size too (Baby AT?)

I think it would be an interesting project for me to carry out if what I believe is true. Yes I know I would have the problem of slots for the graphics etc and other things but could I in effect stick my AT mobo in ther and have it work (without blowing up though lol!)

THe power supply in the 1998 AT pc i have is 200w so what is the psu in the old xbox? I'm guessing it'll actually be more as it supplys a 733mhz celeron etc?

If it were to work and that I wonder how much someone on ebay would pay lol! The USB ports (okay the USB XBOX ports on the xbox look rather similar to those of the AT PC so I could technially use them as well?

Tim

14 Comments

Original Poster

Nobodoy know?

Original Poster

100w - now the question is what would happen if I plugged my pc mobo into it lol? would it go bzzz.. ZAP? or would it power on normally lol?

Tim

Original Poster

Title changed.

Tim

I think the answer's in the power button. Does the original Xbox have the ability to run on standby, to turn itself on and off, and if you trace the cable behind the power button, does it go to the motherboard or the PSU? I ask because the major difference between AT and ATX is that AT uses a mechanical on/off mechanism and you physically switch the PSU itself on or off with it, whereas with ATX, it's more software controled and controlable, allowing the self-shutdowns and bootups and such.

Chances are, the Xbox uses an altered pin configuration, but standard voltages. If you can find out what goes where (and this may be as simple as looking at what the colours are and a little Googling or playing with a volt meter), there's no reason you shouldn't be able to mod any power supply to run the box.

Original Poster

dxx;4421836

I think the answer's in the power button. Does the original Xbox have the … I think the answer's in the power button. Does the original Xbox have the ability to run on standby, to turn itself on and off, and if you trace the cable behind the power button, does it go to the motherboard or the PSU? I ask because the major difference between AT and ATX is that AT uses a mechanical on/off mechanism and you physically switch the PSU itself on or off with it, whereas with ATX, it's more software controled and controlable, allowing the self-shutdowns and bootups and such. Chances are, the Xbox uses an altered pin configuration, but standard voltages. If you can find out what goes where (and this may be as simple as looking at what the colours are and a little Googling or playing with a volt meter), there's no reason you shouldn't be able to mod any power supply to run the box.



I beliveve it does go through the motherboard but it uses the AT power connector from looking on the net the 1.2 xbox and above used ATX connectors.

How is the power button on the front wired then? lol

Tim

Surely the question is why would you want to? Isn't the XBOX more powerful than the AT computer anyway?

Original Poster

jah128;4422145

Surely the question is why would you want to? Isn't the XBOX more … Surely the question is why would you want to? Isn't the XBOX more powerful than the AT computer anyway?



Yes but you can't do much with a legacy pc can you though lol.

ha d alook and the power connectors don't quite match anyway lol.

Might of worked if the xbox was slightly newer and had ATX (V1.2 and above)

Tim

timothyw9;4422270

Yes but you can't do much with a legacy pc can you though lol.ha d alook … Yes but you can't do much with a legacy pc can you though lol.ha d alook and the power connectors don't quite match anyway lol.Might of worked if the xbox was slightly newer and had ATX (V1.2 and above)Tim



Maybe not, but you can run linux or xbmc on your xbox. Or you could run Linux on your legacy PC - maybe make it a torrent server, firewall, net-server, NAS box etc etc.

By the way, little thought - USB ports on an AT system? Was your machine one of the very last AT systems to be made? I thought AT was phased out in ye olde Pentium 1 days, with ATX being the new standard with Pentium 2s, and USB being the new interface alongside them. I thought AT and USB had never coexisted. What kind of system do you have there? You've made me all geekily curious now.

dxx;4427484

By the way, little thought - USB ports on an AT system? Was your machine … By the way, little thought - USB ports on an AT system? Was your machine one of the very last AT systems to be made? I thought AT was phased out in ye olde Pentium 1 days, with ATX being the new standard with Pentium 2s, and USB being the new interface alongside them. I thought AT and USB had never coexisted. What kind of system do you have there? You've made me all geekily curious now.



AT boards went quite a lot later - plenty of socket 7 boards were AT (so right up to AMD K6-3 etc). USB was introduced around 96-97ish (although didn't really become mainstream till a bit later...)

jah128;4427703

AT boards went quite a lot later - plenty of socket 7 boards were AT (so … AT boards went quite a lot later - plenty of socket 7 boards were AT (so right up to AMD K6-3 etc). USB was introduced around 96-97ish (although didn't really become mainstream till a bit later...)



Man, a 500MHz chip with 2MB cache, 256MB of RAM, GeForce video, USB, and a DVD drive. All that, but you;d still have to physically lean down and switch the thing off when you got the "It is now safe to power off your computer" screen. Seems a strange mix of (nearly) modern and 1995. I guess people must've really liked their weighty-feeling power buttons.

dxx;4431540

Man, a 500MHz chip with 2MB cache, 256MB of RAM, GeForce video, USB, and … Man, a 500MHz chip with 2MB cache, 256MB of RAM, GeForce video, USB, and a DVD drive. All that, but you;d still have to physically lean down and switch the thing off when you got the "It is now safe to power off your computer" screen. Seems a strange mix of (nearly) modern and 1995. I guess people must've really liked their weighty-feeling power buttons.



:lol: Ah the good ol' days....
http://www.guidebookgallery.org/pics/gui/startupshutdown/shutdowncomplete/win95.png

jah128;4431642

:lol: Ah the good ol' days....



*wipes tear from eye*
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