Is there a simple way to increase the pixels on a jpeg picture?

Avatardeleted177934513
Found 3rd Jul
Im trying to help someone out by ordering some personalised items for them, however using the pics they have sent I keep getting a low resolution warning which apparently means the end product wont look great. Thanks in advance
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Well, there is a thing that averages out the pixel color and adds it on as the image enlarges. Others then that for jpeg as it's scalar and not vector it will always lose quality when enlarged
hethekid3 m ago

Well, there is a thing that averages out the pixel color and adds it on as …Well, there is a thing that averages out the pixel color and adds it on as the image enlarges. Others then that for jpeg as it's scalar and not vector it will always lose quality when enlarged


That made no sense to me, maybe it will to someone else.
JPEG is a compressed format... no way to increase the size without losing quality.

You need a better quality picture as you can't improve the quality of a JPEG.
Almost certainly about size and not resolution unless you are working with scans. You can open with any editor like Paint and increase the overall size attributes and either increase image size or just add empty space around depending on your needs. You can't just increase pixels otherwise unless you know the CSI zoom enhance trick that is.
While you can 'increase the pixels' (resize to a larger size) it won't add any more detail. So while it'll get rid of the automated message the problem it's warning you about will still be there.

How good the end results will be are dependant on a lot of factors such as the contents of the image (drawing, photograph, logo etc.), the process used to create the items and the size and typical distance the final items are viewed from.

There are a few image where you could resize without problems, but mainly those that started life on a computer to begin with. Something like a screenshot of an old arcade or video game would be just fine resized as there isn't any more detail to add (although make sure you use something that allows 'nearest neighbour' resizing or it'll blur the image).

Otherwise it's a case of getting hold of a better version of the image, potentially re-creating that image in higher quality (if it's a logo etc.) or going ahead and accepting that the results won't be optimal. On the latter option you may want to talk to the sales/support team of the company producing it as they'll have all the facts and can offer some idea of how noticable the end result will be.
You sometimes get these warnings if the picture you have file size is small. Some dumb programs just look at the size of the file and alarm if it's under a certain size. Most art packages will compress a picture far beyond what a normal camera will do on the fly, also most photos are printed at 300dpi.

34230747-AlGl4.jpg
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deleted1779345
many thanks for all the help
Get the sender to upload the pictures to a cloud service for you to download as I suspect they are being compressed by their email application
I so something like this on Blade Runner and on some cop show
kester763rd Jul

You sometimes get these warnings if the picture you have file size is …You sometimes get these warnings if the picture you have file size is small. Some dumb programs just look at the size of the file and alarm if it's under a certain size. Most art packages will compress a picture far beyond what a normal camera will do on the fly, also most photos are printed at 300dpi.[Image]



ofc thats talking about a decent inherent quality - a 3 megapixel noisy photo is still going to look crap as a 7x5
brilly34 m ago

ofc thats talking about a decent inherent quality - a 3 megapixel noisy …ofc thats talking about a decent inherent quality - a 3 megapixel noisy photo is still going to look crap as a 7x5


What do you mean by noisy ? Do you mean compression artefacts/artifacts or low light level noise ?
kester763 m ago

What do you mean by noisy ? Do you mean compression artefacts/artifacts or …What do you mean by noisy ? Do you mean compression artefacts/artifacts or low light level noise ?


doesn't really matter - either/both/neither
noise reduction isn't magic and not the main point - its quality
brilly1 h, 4 m ago

doesn't really matter - either/both/neithernoise reduction isn't magic and …doesn't really matter - either/both/neithernoise reduction isn't magic and not the main point - its quality


What has quality got to do with file size and resolution ? Quality has to do with how accurately the image represents it's original. An 8bit image with the correct aspect ratio will scale perfectly but have an excellent compression ratio.
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