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    Is this a good psu for a good gaming build

    Hello im going to be building my first ever gaming PC, Is this a good PSU to buy : scan.co.uk/pro…psu Thanks. Also if you could be any help does anyone recommend any parts my budget is £700. Thanks

    33 Comments

    £700 for the build or just the PSU? And what do you have at the moment? (Ideas wise)

    hotukdeals.com/dea…207

    It's a little bit more expensive but it will save you money in the long run.

    Check the PSU out on Johnny Gurus website. Should give you a good idea of what is inside the box.

    Have you checked your total watt usage. Most modern GPUs are more power efficient than the older GPUs so you could get away with a good but cheaper 650W.

    It's a fancy PSU so you're paying £20 more than you need to for fancy cables and lots and lots of excess capacity. Unless you're going for a display system in a windowed case or believe you have a real likelihood to go for an Crossfire/SLI system in the future (with all it's downsides) then I'd be looking at something closer to £40-45 than £65.

    dozstanford

    It's a little bit more expensive but it will save you money in the long … It's a little bit more expensive but it will save you money in the long run.



    Not unless he's doing [email protected] or similar.

    EndlessWaves

    It's a fancy PSU so you're paying £20 more than you need to for fancy … It's a fancy PSU so you're paying £20 more than you need to for fancy cables and lots and lots of excess capacity. Unless you're going for a display system in a windowed case or believe you have a real likelihood to go for an Crossfire/SLI system in the future (with all it's downsides) then I'd be looking at something closer to £40-45 than £65.Not unless he's doing [email protected] or similar.



    Please explain how in any conceivable situation using an 80+ Bronze PSU will work out cheaper to run than an 80+ Gold PSU ?

    PSU's are a black art, you have to get the sums right on how much power your system is going to use.

    Get too low a power unit ( or without enough current on the right rails), and you can get spikes that can destroy a cpu, or stop the PC from booting..

    Get too high a power unit, and the efficiency ratings go out of the window.

    You really do need to look at what the gfx card needs, as having a 750watt PSU isnt any guarantee it will supply enough juice; I have a nearly new 750 watt unit* being used as a doorstop, because it wouldnt boot with a new gfx card that an 8 y/o old, 480 Watt psu manages perfectly - not enough current on the 12v rails.

    *Dont buy no-name, even when they claim to be OEM versions of a branded make.

    dozstanford

    Please explain how in any conceivable situation using an 80+ Bronze PSU … Please explain how in any conceivable situation using an 80+ Bronze PSU will work out cheaper to run than an 80+ Gold PSU ?



    Well technically the 80Plus testing only tests efficiency at 20% and up. When the PC is web browsing and doing other day to day tasks it'll only be using 5-10% of such a large PSU's capacity so it's entirely possible that the 80Plus Bronze model is more efficient there than the 80Plus gold one depending on their respective designs.

    But you say it'll save them money in the long run so while it'll probably be a bit more efficient, you'd have to keep it an awful long time before you even saved the £25 difference in purchase price.

    Let's say it saves them 40Wh a day on average. That's about an hour and a half of gaming and a few hours of web browsing and other stuff. That's 1kWh every 25 days or 14p at the average electricity price. It'll take around twelve and a quarter years to save the £25 extra it costs to buy.

    I'd be mildly surprised if we were still using the ATX standard in twelve years, if the PSU even lives that long.

    This is a decent budget PSU but there are a few issues with it.

    1. 750W is most likely too much for your PC. More than likely you will be fine with a 550W but would need to see your build to be certain.

    2. This PSU has an average voltage stability when you switch from hot to cold.

    3. The ripple suppression on the 12V rail is not top notch.

    4. Some of the capacitors are not high end.

    The Corsair RM550X is one of the best PSUs you can buy without going crazy and comes with 10 year guarantee. Well worth the few extra pounds in my opinion.

    Gentle_Giant

    PSU's are a black art, you have to get the sums right on how much power … PSU's are a black art, you have to get the sums right on how much power your system is going to use.Get too low a power unit ( or without enough current on the right rails), and you can get spikes that can destroy a cpu, or stop the PC from booting..Get too high a power unit, and the efficiency ratings go out of the window.You really do need to look at what the gfx card needs, as having a 750watt PSU isnt any guarantee it will supply enough juice; I have a nearly new 750 watt unit* being used as a doorstop, because it wouldnt boot with a new gfx card that an 8 y/o old, 480 Watt psu manages perfectly - not enough current on the 12v rails.*Dont buy no-name, even when they claim to be OEM versions of a branded make.



    ​Efficiency should be fine as you only use what you need. Hence the fans stop when not under highload on most PSUs. Very little energy is wasted

    ive got the 550 version running a 970 and i5 4690 3xssd and 2xhdd and it is a very good psu, but if you want to do overclocking etc probably better going for a 650 evga gold or some of the other gold ones as stated above. it all depends on what you use it for. also do check out johnnyguru reviews of any psu on your shortlist to help you make up your mind

    I made this build for you: uk.pcpartpicker.com/lis…FYr

    You may get some of the parts cheaper if you shop around but this gives you somewhere to start. You have about £75 left so you can play about with parts. Can get a windows 7 key from ebay for less than a £5 and download Windows 10 from Microsoft for extra saving.

    I'd avoid cooler master for a gaming rig, I had nothing but issues with my PC just shutting down, spent weeks trying to find the cause, a mate lent me his corsair and it never happened ever again, for a PSU get a decent brand.

    PKRichie

    I'd avoid cooler master for a gaming rig, I had nothing but issues with … I'd avoid cooler master for a gaming rig, I had nothing but issues with my PC just shutting down, spent weeks trying to find the cause, a mate lent me his corsair and it never happened ever again, for a PSU get a decent brand.


    And Corsair is not a decent brand either.
    Some of their PSUs are okay (especially when they were entering the market and used really good Seasonic-made ones), some of them are rather poor.
    Many 'brands' relies on others (OEMs) to actually build the supply, so it's the reputation of the actual OEM is usually what is important.
    This CoolerMaster G750M is made by CWT who make a lot of the poor Corsair supplies too.
    Having said all that, it seems CoolerMaster only use rather poor OEMs so probably best to avoid.
    EVGA might be worth considering as the use *some* good OEMs.

    kester76

    ​Efficiency should be fine as you only use what you need. Hence the fans s … ​Efficiency should be fine as you only use what you need. Hence the fans stop when not under highload on most PSUs. Very little energy is wasted



    Its not the fans that are the issue; go have a read of one of the more technical websites about psu design, post #8 nearly nailed it; the psus are not tested across their full range, and their awarded rating is based mostly on their efficiency at 80% full power (hence the name, and as long as they meet nominal efficiency ratings at other power levels), so one may well get a Gold due to very good regulation at 80%, but be less efficient than a Bronze in real life use.

    Back to those more technical websites, one tests PSUs to destruction, and you would be surprised how many brand name psus go boom, long before reaching their supposed 100% level, some blow not far above 80%, and I seem to remember one (not 80 rated), blowing at 50%.
    The guy also tests for spikes and voltage drift across the full range of power outputs.
    (if only I could remember the name of the site).
    Edited by: "Gentle_Giant" 19th Jan

    Gentle_Giant

    Its not the fans that are the issue; go have a read of one of the more … Its not the fans that are the issue; go have a read of one of the more technical websites about psu design, post #8 nearly nailed it; the psus are not tested across their full range, and their awarded rating is based mostly on their efficiency at 80% full power (hence the name, and as long as they meet nominal efficiency ratings at other power levels), so one may well get a Gold due to very good regulation at 80%, but be less efficient than a Bronze in real life use.Back to those more technical websites, one tests PSUs to destruction, and you would be surprised how many brand name psus go boom, long before reaching their supposed 100% level, some blow not far above 80%, and I seem to remember one (not 80 rated), blowing at 50%.The guy also tests for spikes and voltage drift across the full range of power outputs.(if only I could remember the name of the site).



    Johnny Guru website, he tests the PSU in ovens to see if they start to drift when used in extreme conditions. Most PSUs can take a lot of heat as I found out when one of my PSU fans failed. Started to cook the case till the point I burn my leg on it. Quantum fireball started to miss read garbage but once it cooled down it was fine That was back when Quantum drives were very reliable before Maxtor bought them.

    This link should help explain it. I ripped it from the link but it explains what's happening better than I could

    techpowerup.com/for…56/

    80% efficiency means :-

    80% Electricity
    20% Heat in the conversion.

    The basic 80 Plus rating means that the PSU is rated for at least 80% efficiency at 20% load, 50% load, and 100% load.

    The 80 Plus Bronze rating means that the PSU is rated for at least 82% efficiency at 20% load, 85% at 50% load, and 82% at 100% load.

    The 80 Plus Silver rating means that the PSU is rated for at least 85% efficiency at 20% load, 88% at 50% load, and 85% at 100% load.

    The 80 Plus Gold rating meas that the PSU is rated for at least 87% efficiency at 20% load, 90% at 50% load, and 87% at 100% load.

    The 80 Plus Platinum(bet you didn't know there was a Platinum) rating means that the PSU is rated for at least 90% efficiency at 20% load, 92% at 50% load, and 89% at 100% load.


    It's just how well they convert mains into DC. Higher the efficiency the lower the temps of the PSU.

    kester76

    Johnny Guru website, he tests the PSU in ovens to see if they start to … Johnny Guru website, he tests the PSU in ovens to see if they start to drift when used in extreme conditions. Most PSUs can take a lot of heat as I found out when one of my PSU fans failed. Started to cook the case till the point I burn my leg on it. Quantum fireball started to miss read garbage but once it cooled down it was fine That was back when Quantum drives were very reliable before Maxtor bought them.This link should help explain it. I ripped it from the link but it explains what's happening better than I could https://www.techpowerup.com/forums/threads/how-does-psu-efficiency-affect-me-and-do-i-really-need-an-80-plus-gold-power-supply.129456/80% efficiency means :- 80% Electricity20% Heat in the conversion.The basic 80 Plus rating means that the PSU is rated for at least 80% efficiency at 20% load, 50% load, and 100% load.The 80 Plus Bronze rating means that the PSU is rated for at least 82% efficiency at 20% load, 85% at 50% load, and 82% at 100% load.The 80 Plus Silver rating means that the PSU is rated for at least 85% efficiency at 20% load, 88% at 50% load, and 85% at 100% load.The 80 Plus Gold rating meas that the PSU is rated for at least 87% efficiency at 20% load, 90% at 50% load, and 87% at 100% load.The 80 Plus Platinum(bet you didn't know there was a Platinum) rating means that the PSU is rated for at least 90% efficiency at 20% load, 92% at 50% load, and 89% at 100% load.It's just how well they convert mains into DC. Higher the efficiency the lower the temps of the PSU.




    Ah, OK, I mis-remembered the rating.

    I am old enough to remember the Fireballs.

    Mind you, my first personal HDD was a MASSIVE 20MB MFM, and I was using a 12" 10MB drive at work a few years before that.

    Gentle_Giant

    Its not the fans that are the issue; go have a read of one of the more … Its not the fans that are the issue; go have a read of one of the more technical websites about psu design, post #8 nearly nailed it; the psus are not tested across their full range, and their awarded rating is based mostly on their efficiency at 80% full power (hence the name, and as long as they meet nominal efficiency ratings at other power levels), so one may well get a Gold due to very good regulation at 80%, but be less efficient than a Bronze in real life use.Back to those more technical websites, one tests PSUs to destruction, and you would be surprised how many brand name psus go boom, long before reaching their supposed 100% level, some blow not far above 80%, and I seem to remember one (not 80 rated), blowing at 50%.The guy also tests for spikes and voltage drift across the full range of power outputs.(if only I could remember the name of the site).



    80Plus is is 80% efficiency or above, not efficiency at 80% load.

    And your second claim seems unlikely. Drifting out of spec slightly yes but blowing up? I've never seen any such behaviour in reviews before.

    kester76

    The basic 80 Plus rating means that the PSU is rated for at least 80% … The basic 80 Plus rating means that the PSU is rated for at least 80% efficiency at 20% load, 50% load, and 100% load.The 80 Plus Bronze rating means that the PSU is rated for at least 82% efficiency at 20% load, 85% at 50% load, and 82% at 100% load.The 80 Plus Silver rating means that the PSU is rated for at least 85% efficiency at 20% load, 88% at 50% load, and 85% at 100% load.The 80 Plus Gold rating meas that the PSU is rated for at least 87% efficiency at 20% load, 90% at 50% load, and 87% at 100% load.The 80 Plus Platinum(bet you didn't know there was a Platinum) rating means that the PSU is rated for at least 90% efficiency at 20% load, 92% at 50% load, and 89% at 100% load.



    They are if you're in the US and running it on 110V, but I think everyone reading HotUKDeals will be buying UK models and running them at 230V so the relevant numbers are:

    80Plus is 82/85/82
    Bronze is 85/88/85
    Silver is 87/90/87
    Gold is 90/92/89
    Platinum is 92/94/90
    Titanium is 94/96/94 and also requires 90% efficieny at 10% load.

    Gentle_Giant

    Ah, OK, I mis-remembered the rating.I am old enough to remember the … Ah, OK, I mis-remembered the rating.I am old enough to remember the Fireballs.Mind you, my first personal HDD was a MASSIVE 20MB MFM, and I was using a 12" 10MB drive at work a few years before that.



    ​Must of cost some serious money. I can remember being show an old solid vax disk. Was about 10kg in weight.

    EndlessWaves

    80Plus is is 80% efficiency or above, not efficiency at 80% load. And … 80Plus is is 80% efficiency or above, not efficiency at 80% load. And your second claim seems unlikely. Drifting out of spec slightly yes but blowing up? I've never seen any such behaviour in reviews before. They are if you're in the US and running it on 110V, but I think everyone reading HotUKDeals will be buying UK models and running them at 230V so the relevant numbers are:80Plus is 82/85/82Bronze is 85/88/85Silver is 87/90/87Gold is 90/92/89Platinum is 92/94/90Titanium is 94/96/94 and also requires 90% efficieny at 10% load.


    Thanks for the heads up, I must of grabbed the wrong information
    http://www.athenapower.us/products/power_supply/Images/80plus-chart.jpg

    Yeah, PSUs can catch fire and blow up if components get too hot. A friend showed me his hard drive where a power IC had blown off. I got some of those chip molex to Sata cables that catch fire too off amazon

    EndlessWaves

    80Plus is is 80% efficiency or above, not efficiency at 80% load. And … 80Plus is is 80% efficiency or above, not efficiency at 80% load. And your second claim seems unlikely. Drifting out of spec slightly yes but blowing up? I've never seen any such behaviour in reviews before. They are if you're in the US and running it on 110V, but I think everyone reading HotUKDeals will be buying UK models and running them at 230V so the relevant numbers are:80Plus is 82/85/82Bronze is 85/88/85Silver is 87/90/87Gold is 90/92/89Platinum is 92/94/90Titanium is 94/96/94 and also requires 90% efficieny at 10% load.



    The guy doing the reviews published photos of the psu remains, and a description of the blow-up during testing.

    Sadly, I lost the bookmarks to a lot of interesting little websites when the rozzers took and trashed my computers a few years ago. Some I have stumbled upon again, but most are still lost.

    kester76

    Thanks for the heads up, I must of grabbed the wrong information



    You've done it again I'm afraid, that's the rating for the 230V redundant power supplies, not 230V consumer PSUs.

    The 80Plus certification was invented and is administered by a company called Ecova, their website with the official ratings is here:
    plugloadsolutions.com/80P…spx

    EndlessWaves

    You've done it again I'm afraid, that's the rating for the 230V redundant … You've done it again I'm afraid, that's the rating for the 230V redundant power supplies, not 230V consumer PSUs.The 80Plus certification was invented and is administered by a company called Ecova, their website with the official ratings is here:https://www.plugloadsolutions.com/80PlusPowerSupplies.aspx



    ​I see EU and non EU PSUs but what is the difference ? Does EU denote end user or some other acronym ?

    How are these PSUs different ?

    kester76

    ​I see EU and non EU PSUs but what is the difference ? Does EU denote end … ​I see EU and non EU PSUs but what is the difference ? Does EU denote end user or some other acronym ? :)How are these PSUs different ?



    ​By redundant do they mean 2ndary psu or a ups setup ?

    Rabmac1

    Some of the capacitors are not high end.



    What kind of capacitors are used?

    kester76

    ​By redundant do they mean 2ndary psu or a ups setup ?



    Neither, it's a main PSU with two units and two power inputs within a single ATX enclosure that'll keep outputting even if one of those power inputs or units fails.

    They're for expensive servers that need to be kept running at all times.

    EndlessWaves

    Neither, it's a main PSU with two units and two power inputs within a … Neither, it's a main PSU with two units and two power inputs within a single ATX enclosure that'll keep outputting even if one of those power inputs or units fails. They're for expensive servers that need to be kept running at all times.


    Just looked it up. I can understand the need but can't understand how or why you would need different ratings for redundant and non redundant PSUs. Is this due to the power hit of using PSUs in combination ? Also is it rated per PSU or the combination and are they matched pairs to prevent PSU mismatching ?

    I couldn't tell you why, possibly it's an allowance for the extra connections required to make it redundant and swappable?

    EndlessWaves

    I couldn't tell you why, possibly it's an allowance for the extra … I couldn't tell you why, possibly it's an allowance for the extra connections required to make it redundant and swappable?


    Cramming all that tech into such a small space probably effects it a lot even though they're longer. I wonder if they're rated per PSU slice or the grouping as they can be swapped.

    It looks like PSU power is load balanced between atleast 2 PSUs with maybe a third idling. I'd look into this once I not so sleep deprived as I guess this effects their rating

    DaveTaylor

    What kind of capacitors are used?



    Anyone else know why some of the capacitors are high end and some are not or was Rabmac1's comment complete and utter conjecture? I am after a PSU but the comment about the capacitors is off-putting.

    DaveTaylor

    Anyone else know why some of the capacitors are high end and some are not … Anyone else know why some of the capacitors are high end and some are not or was Rabmac1's comment complete and utter conjecture? I am after a PSU but the comment about the capacitors is off-putting.



    Because it's a lower price.

    I don't know what the actual difference in failure rates over the average lifespan is but I can't imagine it being that high. A couple of percent maybe?

    EndlessWaves

    Because it's a lower price.I don't know what the actual difference in … Because it's a lower price.I don't know what the actual difference in failure rates over the average lifespan is but I can't imagine it being that high. A couple of percent maybe?



    A lower price usually indicates lower quality components but not always. The earlier comment was saying "some of the capacitors are not high end" which means that some are high end. I am not sure if this comment was purely made up or whether the person who quoted this actually knows the type of capacitors used. Low price does not always equate to lesser quality and real facts rather than assumptions can help make my mind up when making a purchase.

    DaveTaylor

    Anyone else know why some of the capacitors are high end and some are not … Anyone else know why some of the capacitors are high end and some are not or was Rabmac1's comment complete and utter conjecture? I am after a PSU but the comment about the capacitors is off-putting.

    I got the information from Jonny Guru website, which are always on the money when it comes to PSUs. According to the site this PSU contains Elite, Jun Fu, and CapXon capacitors.
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