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is this ebay listing legit?

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Posted 12th JulEdited by:"D3SI"
I understand the seller has good amount of feedback but this NVME SSD is over £125 everywhere and they are seliing it for just under £110

ebay.co.uk/itm…d:1

or this one even cheaper

ebay.co.uk/itm…N=1
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Looks fine to me
dont see the problem, pay via paypal you will be covered...
At £125 each the vendor/retailer is getting at least 50% profit.

Any cheaper then the seller may have cheaper overheads and/or is prepared to accept less profit.
tardytortoise12/07/2020 09:39

At £125 each the vendor/retailer is getting at least 50% profit. Any …At £125 each the vendor/retailer is getting at least 50% profit. Any cheaper then the seller may have cheaper overheads and/or is prepared to accept less profit.


Really? you think sellers make 50% profit selling these at £125?
I think all other PC component sellers would love to know where you buy your stock from to make those profits.
Many sell at around 10% or less profit margin on components.
Edited by: "spannerzone" 12th Jul
spannerzone12/07/2020 09:53

Really? you think sellers make 50% profit selling these at £125?I think …Really? you think sellers make 50% profit selling these at £125?I think all other PC component sellers would love to know where you buy your stock from to make those profits.Many sell at around 10% or less profit margin on components.



really! Retail outlets make profit. Without doing any research I would bet these are made in China and often a retailer can buy direct from manufacturer. The old method of agents and wholesalers etc died some years ago. And these are not components - they are finished products ready to be used, needing no assembly.
Edited by: "tardytortoise" 12th Jul
tardytortoise12/07/2020 14:26

really! Retail outlets make profit. Without doing any research I would …really! Retail outlets make profit. Without doing any research I would bet these are made in China and often a retailer can buy direct from manufacturer. The old method of agents and wholesalers etc died some years ago. And these are not components - they are finished products ready to be used, needing no assembly.


Well there you've gone and said it, without doing any research - do some research and you'll find computer components have very slim profit margins of anything from 5 to 15% on things liks memory, cpu, hard drives, SSDs. Things like peripherals, ink, cables, mice, keyboards may have considerably higher profit margins.

This isn't the same thing as selling furniture where they do have massive profit margins.

Memory is sold like a commodity and prices fluctuate daily. If you want to deal directly with a manufacturer you're going to have to be buying in thousands of items at a time to get any decent pricing and they won't actually deal with you unless you buy in bulk. Some random ebayer selling 10 SSDs isn't going to be buying them from the factory direct.
Edited by: "spannerzone" 12th Jul
Yep, the big boys buy in bulk cheaply direct from the manufacturer, but sell in single quantities, often creating multi accounts. They are cash and time rich, capable of reacting to fluctuations. The OP was talking about a £15 price difference - chickenfeed, on such an item. As long as you get good quality why not buy the cheaper item? But don't try and kid me sellers are only getting 10% or less. I would not bother getting out of bed or taking the associated risks for this.
Never just look solely at the feedback score, always look at the detail too.

Of the first seller's past 9 seller feedbacks, 4 are negative and 1 is neutral. Second seller looks fine.
Edited by: "spoo" 12th Jul
First one is a private seller (no warranty) who should be trading as a business, second one is breaking the law by not displaying a complete business address. Either could be fakes/copies, just buy from an authorised retailer.
tardytortoise12/07/2020 15:25

Yep, the big boys buy in bulk cheaply direct from the manufacturer, but …Yep, the big boys buy in bulk cheaply direct from the manufacturer, but sell in single quantities, often creating multi accounts. They are cash and time rich, capable of reacting to fluctuations. The OP was talking about a £15 price difference - chickenfeed, on such an item. As long as you get good quality why not buy the cheaper item? But don't try and kid me sellers are only getting 10% or less. I would not bother getting out of bed or taking the associated risks for this.


Well as delightful as this conversation is, it's going nowhere so time to leave as is. I wasn't trying to kid you about pricing, frankly life's too short.
tardytortoise12/07/2020 09:39

At £125 each the vendor/retailer is getting at least 50% profit. Any …At £125 each the vendor/retailer is getting at least 50% profit. Any cheaper then the seller may have cheaper overheads and/or is prepared to accept less profit.



spannerzone12/07/2020 14:54

Well there you've gone and said it, without doing any research - do some …Well there you've gone and said it, without doing any research - do some research and you'll find computer components have very slim profit margins of anything from 5 to 15% on things liks memory, cpu, hard drives, SSDs. Things like peripherals, ink, cables, mice, keyboards may have considerably higher profit margins.This isn't the same thing as selling furniture where they do have massive profit margins.Memory is sold like a commodity and prices fluctuate daily. If you want to deal directly with a manufacturer you're going to have to be buying in thousands of items at a time to get any decent pricing and they won't actually deal with you unless you buy in bulk. Some random ebayer selling 10 SSDs isn't going to be buying them from the factory direct.


No, spannerzone is right. It definitely isn't 50%. And a quick Google could have easily told you it's 5-10%.

You might not get out of bed for a 5% profit margin, but a business doing billions in turnover is still going to be making millions in profit on a 5% margin, even after all their expenses. I.e. if you sold one hard drive for £100 and made £5 on it, that's nothing, but if you were a business big enough to sell a million of them a year, that's £5,000,000.

In business you can either sell few items at high profit margins or many items at low profit margins. High margins are only really possible if there's no competition (like if you're an artist producing unique work) or if there's really strong brand recognition (like Apple, who do make more than 10% on their hardware, but still not 50%). So any business where there's competition - which is most of them - is operating on a slim margin and going for high sales.
reddragon10513/07/2020 16:08

No, spannerzone is right. It definitely isn't 50%. And a quick Google …No, spannerzone is right. It definitely isn't 50%. And a quick Google could have easily told you it's 5-10%.You might not get out of bed for a 5% profit margin, but a business doing billions in turnover is still going to be making millions in profit on a 5% margin, even after all their expenses. I.e. if you sold one hard drive for £100 and made £5 on it, that's nothing, but if you were a business big enough to sell a million of them a year, that's £5,000,000.In business you can either sell few items at high profit margins or many items at low profit margins. High margins are only really possible if there's no competition (like if you're an artist producing unique work) or if there's really strong brand recognition (like Apple, who do make more than 10% on their hardware, but still not 50%). So any business where there's competition - which is most of them - is operating on a slim margin and going for high sales.


Well I've only based my comments on working in the electronics and IT industries for 35 years .....customers often assumed we'd be making 100% profit when they asked for 30 or 40% discount and we politely advised them we'd be selling at a considerable loss... they simply could not believe it and often refused to.... I am sure that because certain retailers have 50% sales on a regular basis, it's a common misconception that everyone selling any product is making the same profits. That's why so many big brand companies have gone out of business.
Edited by: "spannerzone" 13th Jul
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