Found 13th Jan
Dear members, been stuck with low paid job in hospitality, I'm thinking to start career in IT. I've previous basic experience ( work in internet cafe for 6 yrs and I'm really interested about IT). I'm thinking to do Microsoft sever 2012. How is that sound? How much will be starting salary? And if anyone can direct me some online training course where they write about course fees and with good feedback I would highly appreciate it. Thanx

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ITIL V3 would be the best course to start - ITOnlinelearning

It's not so easy. I have a degree in IT with MS Server, CCNA, JavaOOP, Web Services etc as modules and I don't have a job in IT.

It's a saturated market and automation is big business, IPv6 is auto config for instance.

I am also a Chef and work as that.

Try something else or try it if you want but don't get your hopes up.

I would recommend you look at Microsoft Virtual academy. It offers loads of free courses and resources to get you started.

mva.microsoft.com/

OP, go with Stepheat idea, do the free ones then if you can afford the paid ones until you get an MS certification. In terms of jobs, thats a tough one. As Rodders suggested it's a tough market. You may find a job at a call center, there are still a few left in the UK, or a School IT assistant on living wage for example. But degrees are often prerequisites for even the most basic IT job.

Look at jobsites like indeed .

Do the Microsoft stuff first, then progress onto further tech courses, then ITIL, then project mgmt.

Sorry This isn't the answer you're looking for as I don't know about the IT courses, but it's just an idea...
As you've already got experience in the hospitality industry , are you able to increase your value (or the value you bring to your job) in that industry and work your way up the ladder?
You already know things about that industry that others don't , could you create a niche market using your knowledge and go self employed.

I don't know the answers about IT courses, so just thought I'd throw these ideas around.

I do know someone in his 20's who quit his uni course in IT so never got the degree, But has managed to get decent paying jobs in web development. So whilst it's a competitive market, it's definitely possible
Edited by: "bobtastic" 13th Jan

I've been in IT 20 years.. There are too many large IT companies shedding staff with plenty of experience. the market is saturated and salaries are low.. You would be much better doing mobile apps training. way better than learning PC or server stuff..

That's interesting.

So, instead of going the general IT route, Maybe checkout smaller niche areas that are upcoming in the IT industr?.
Mobile app development specifically dealing with the block chain or something like that.

Also, if you have spare time , you could try some £10 udemy courses on app design (not programming).
It's a job where you don't need a degree, but rather just a portfolio to show what you can do
Edited by: "bobtastic" 13th Jan

From hospitality to IT is do-able. You could probably start off on a helpdesk like most people. But to do a Server 2012 course with no experience can be very difficult... Probably not worth doing 2012 now anyway as 2016 is coming out (or is out)

bobtastic

That's interesting. So, instead of going the general IT route, Maybe … That's interesting. So, instead of going the general IT route, Maybe checkout smaller niche areas that are upcoming in the IT industr?. Mobile app development specifically dealing with the block chain or something like that. Also, if you have spare time , you could try some £10 udemy courses on app design (not programming). It's a job where you don't need a degree, but rather just a portfolio to show what you can do



​You could, but you always need a general IT education and training first.

Much development is done offshore.

To be blunt think of IT roles that can't be done offshore where a UK presence is needed. Hands on server engineer, network cabling, datacenter engineer, UK help desk, desktop engineer, IT security, customer facing roles.....

Unfortunately junior roles are disappearing rapidly ad with advances in technology many things are done remotely, Server and applications support and development from India, Help desk in the Philippines and so on.

Original Poster

Looks like not so good future. How about mobile repair? I just need to make some more money. It's very difficult to work on 7.20 and my company won't increase salary unless I become supervisor and do different shift. As my wife also working around 30hrs/pw it's really difficult to different shift. after paying rent in London nothing left to save for my little girl.

Interesting read

The Microsoft certification courses aren't for the faint hearted, and most companies are going for graduates. Sorry, not much is easy these days.

many companies I deal with have offshore help desks as they call it. most of the big UK data centers will be monitored remotely from India then the call staff are in Romania or other EUROPEAN country. the NOC tech is uk and the field engineering.. all the rest has gone from 80% of the top corporate companies. so the UK has a wealth of redundant staff.. but read the IT sites and we have a skills gap.. that is because they are only paying £16k for IT jobs.. so after 7 years those people leave the industry disillusioned. I know at least three colleagues who did this.. it's a shame. but why work in IT for peanuts when you can drive a lorry for more.. (that's what one went to do)

Bigfootpete

The Microsoft certification courses aren't for the faint hearted, and … The Microsoft certification courses aren't for the faint hearted, and most companies are going for graduates. Sorry, not much is easy these days.



​Agree. And the unfortunate issue is that companies can hire Masters Graduates in India for well below average salary here.

In my view train for a job where the entry is not too tough, the training is not that expensive and you can train in your own time. I'm talking driver as poster above ( even these will be semi automated in 10 years) electrician, plumber, heating, AC, alarm, security engineers? I seen to spend enough on the above in maintenance and upgrades so someone is making cash!

Take a look at some of the free courses on coursera.org/
Learn Linux systems administration there's plenty of jobs doing that I've worked in IT for 17 years and we're always looking for new staff. Also look into cloud technologies such as AWS and azure, very in demand skills at the moment.

DVS_Dee

Take a look at some of the free courses on https://www.coursera.org/Learn … Take a look at some of the free courses on https://www.coursera.org/Learn Linux systems administration there's plenty of jobs doing that I've worked in IT for 17 years and we're always looking for new staff. Also look into cloud technologies such as AWS and azure, very in demand skills at the moment.



​Which of the above require none or very few basic qualifications? GCSE, HND. Degree . ....

Depends were you live as well.

An apprenticeship may be the the way forward to get your foot in the door, once you get experience you are flying.

googleboogle

Depends were you live as well. An apprenticeship may be the the way … Depends were you live as well. An apprenticeship may be the the way forward to get your foot in the door, once you get experience you are flying.



​in IT for someone mid 20s with few quals. Really?

dothedealnow

​in IT for someone mid 20s with few quals. Really?



Depends if you have experience.

People can cram MCSE/CCNA stuff now on youtube.

I interview for IT staff, and I take people skills then experience over qualifications.

Some qualifications are worth more than others though.

DVS_Dee

Take a look at some of the free courses on https://www.coursera.org/Learn … Take a look at some of the free courses on https://www.coursera.org/Learn Linux systems administration there's plenty of jobs doing that I've worked in IT for 17 years and we're always looking for new staff. Also look into cloud technologies such as AWS and azure, very in demand skills at the moment.




This, but with cloud stuff I expect that to head off shore very quickly

Now take a look at this for a CV..

Resume

googleboogle

Depends if you have experience.People can cram MCSE/CCNA stuff now on … Depends if you have experience.People can cram MCSE/CCNA stuff now on youtube.I interview for IT staff, and I take people skills then experience over qualifications. Some qualifications are worth more than others though.



​You need to read the whole post......

googleboogle

This, but with cloud stuff I expect that to head off shore very quickly



​Already has.

Dawsy

Now take a look at this for a CV.. Resume



​That just annoying.

dothedealnow

​Already has.



​OO has no experience, no quals.

dothedealnow

​OO has no experience, no quals.



Hence try and get an apprentership

I've worked in IT for over 20yrs...I work for one of the worlds largest computer corps.

Payrises are non existent and almost every month we are bullet dodging to avoid redundancy....basically anything other than physical hardware support and Niche stuff is almost all offshored now.

I only survive as I choose specialize in nothing in particular ( I have in the past) but have a good knowledge of all technologies....so can be involved in almost any project.

So as others have said, bottom rung IT jobs are hard to find, the market is over saturated and most jobs in this area have been bestshored, you need to specialize in something Niche to stand out...

rodders443

It's not so easy. I have a degree in IT with MS Server, CCNA, JavaOOP, … It's not so easy. I have a degree in IT with MS Server, CCNA, JavaOOP, Web Services etc as modules and I don't have a job in IT. It's a saturated market and automation is big business, IPv6 is auto config for instance.I am also a Chef and work as that.Try something else or try it if you want but don't get your hopes up.



Computer Science and mobile developer here.. no fancy I.T. job either..

Use of the term "IT" is too vague, there are many different jobs, with different skills, that fall under this banner. Also the fact that the OP quickly was willing to move to mobile repair as soon as someone wrongly (in my opinion) said IT isn't worth getting into as it's a saturated market, shows the OP's main driver is more money, rather than the career path. Note - there is nothing wrong with chasing money, but there should be a desire to do the job as well (especially when looking for a career change).

Jobs in IT are not saturated in my opinion, the skill sets may be changing, but if anything IT is booming and is the future. So I would encourage those looking to get into the industry to take these comments with a pinch of salt.

My advice to the OP is to seek some careers advice, local councils quite often have job/career sessions. Find out what the realistic options may be for entry level job's in the industry, and see if any of them would be acceptable, and go for it 100%. There may be sacrifices to be made to get there though, possibly paying for training or exams, maybe taking a lower wage to start, maybe increased travelling and/or costs, but if you want it enough you can achieve it, and the long term payoff will likely be worth it. Unfortunately if it was simple to switch from a job like hospitality to a higher paying IT job, everyone would be doing it, so prepare for some hard work to achieve it.

As a sidenote, I don't think taking qualifications in areas such as Microsoft server etc will benefit in getting an initial job. As ultimately you still have no experience. Employers would rather take someone with some experience and train them for those qualifications later.

KevClark1985

Use of the term "IT" is too vague, there are many different jobs, with … Use of the term "IT" is too vague, there are many different jobs, with different skills, that fall under this banner. Also the fact that the OP quickly was willing to move to mobile repair as soon as someone wrongly (in my opinion) said IT isn't worth getting into as it's a saturated market, shows the OP's main driver is more money, rather than the career path. Note - there is nothing wrong with chasing money, but there should be a desire to do the job as well (especially when looking for a career change). Jobs in IT are not saturated in my opinion, the skill sets may be changing, but if anything IT is booming and is the future. So I would encourage those looking to get into the industry to take these comments with a pinch of salt.My advice to the OP is to seek some careers advice, local councils quite often have job/career sessions. Find out what the realistic options may be for entry level job's in the industry, and see if any of them would be acceptable, and go for it 100%. There may be sacrifices to be made to get there though, possibly paying for training or exams, maybe taking a lower wage to start, maybe increased travelling and/or costs, but if you want it enough you can achieve it, and the long term payoff will likely be worth it. Unfortunately if it was simple to switch from a job like hospitality to a higher paying IT job, everyone would be doing it, so prepare for some hard work to achieve it. As a sidenote, I don't think taking qualifications in areas such as Microsoft server etc will benefit in getting an initial job. As ultimately you still have no experience. Employers would rather take someone with some experience and train them for those qualifications later.



​Agree with this. Nothing is a given in IT, it's a ruthless industry on occasions but it's booming. Cyber, cloud are both growing markets and with data protection rules changing I see the UK being more protective about where their data is stored

AStonedRaichu

Computer Science and mobile developer here.. no fancy I.T. job either..



Total pants isn't it !!


darlodge

​Agree with this. Nothing is a given in IT, it's a ruthless industry on o … ​Agree with this. Nothing is a given in IT, it's a ruthless industry on occasions but it's booming. Cyber, cloud are both growing markets and with data protection rules changing I see the UK being more protective about where their data is stored




The new data protection rules will create lots of new jobs, along with head aches. Especially the removal of data part.

​I left IT after 30 years. Dodging the bullets was getting a little tiresome.
I worked for many of the large outsourcers.
I was the one off shoring low level jobs.

KevClark1985

Use of the term "IT" is too vague, there are many different jobs, with … Use of the term "IT" is too vague, there are many different jobs, with different skills, that fall under this banner. Also the fact that the OP quickly was willing to move to mobile repair as soon as someone wrongly (in my opinion) said IT isn't worth getting into as it's a saturated market, shows the OP's main driver is more money, rather than the career path. Note - there is nothing wrong with chasing money, but there should be a desire to do the job as well (especially when looking for a career change). Jobs in IT are not saturated in my opinion, the skill sets may be changing, but if anything IT is booming and is the future. So I would encourage those looking to get into the industry to take these comments with a pinch of salt.My advice to the OP is to seek some careers advice, local councils quite often have job/career sessions. Find out what the realistic options may be for entry level job's in the industry, and see if any of them would be acceptable, and go for it 100%. There may be sacrifices to be made to get there though, possibly paying for training or exams, maybe taking a lower wage to start, maybe increased travelling and/or costs, but if you want it enough you can achieve it, and the long term payoff will likely be worth it. Unfortunately if it was simple to switch from a job like hospitality to a higher paying IT job, everyone would be doing it, so prepare for some hard work to achieve it. As a sidenote, I don't think taking qualifications in areas such as Microsoft server etc will benefit in getting an initial job. As ultimately you still have no experience. Employers would rather take someone with some experience and train them for those qualifications later.



​Whats your IT experience?

darlodge

​Agree with this. Nothing is a given in IT, it's a ruthless industry on o … ​Agree with this. Nothing is a given in IT, it's a ruthless industry on occasions but it's booming. Cyber, cloud are both growing markets and with data protection rules changing I see the UK being more protective about where their data is stored



​And all those technologies and services can be remotely managed off shore with a few Government exceptions. I have offshored them.

What business are you in?

googleboogle

Hence try and get an apprentership



​You don't have a Scooby Doo.....

Original Poster

Thanx fellow members! Your honest opinion really makes me thinking more. It was really helpful and probably save me to make from another mistake. Which I really can't afford now. Thanx guys.

I work in the tech industry and i find that it is very difficult to get into unless you have experience. Our company for example does not recruit anyone without a lot of experience already unless you have some specialism that they need to apply to tech, tech companies arent good at training.

I work in the niche area of financial software which pays very well but that is simply because of the financial aspect. Not an easy industry if you want an easy job that pays well as it is by no means easy. There are easier jobs that pays well. You are also going to be up against very tough competition as i find people i work with in tech are very intelligent and extremely quick thinkers and doers. So unless you are the sort of person that can learn and think quickly, you will find it very stressful. They also tend to be very young as that is the age group that gets attracted to tech and the sort of age group that can think very quickly.

Best way to move career is to move to an area that is still related to what you have done so you bring across experience to another field. For example, i brought across financial background to tech. You could move to an area that uses your experience in hospitality, would be your best bet rather than start fresh from something completely new to you.
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