KitKat chunky

26
Found 30th Apr
omg.... went into Alid on Wednesday and my Mrs picked a 4 pack of KitKat chunkys up.
i laughed and said to her that i was a normal packet of 4 sticks of KitKat as i genuinely belived it was ?
i swear a chunky used to be about 1 inch high ?
these were about 10mm.
i wish i would have brought them now so I could have posted a pic!
its getting ridiculous now, if they remove any more they will have to rename it to KitKat thins
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You're right, it's gone beyond a joke.
These days, you have to eat 2 chocolate bars just to get the same as 1 of the old chocolate bars.
As for them saying that they're making them smaller to decrease people's calorie intake, the opposite it happening because they're eating 2 bars instead of 1.
26 Comments
You're right, it's gone beyond a joke.
These days, you have to eat 2 chocolate bars just to get the same as 1 of the old chocolate bars.
As for them saying that they're making them smaller to decrease people's calorie intake, the opposite it happening because they're eating 2 bars instead of 1.
It seems like today's standard 4pk sizes are the old funsize size.
chimp14uk1 h, 7 m ago

You're right, it's gone beyond a joke.These days, you have to eat 2 …You're right, it's gone beyond a joke.These days, you have to eat 2 chocolate bars just to get the same as 1 of the old chocolate bars.As for them saying that they're making them smaller to decrease people's calorie intake, the opposite it happening because they're eating 2 bars instead of 1.


If two of the new size are the same as one of the former size, then there is neither a decrease, nor an increase, in calorie intake.

Those that do have a modicum of willpower, however, may be satisfied with one of the new bars.
brought
fanpages59 m ago

If two of the new size are the same as one of the former size, then there …If two of the new size are the same as one of the former size, then there is neither a decrease, nor an increase, in calorie intake. Those that do have a modicum of willpower, however, may be satisfied with one of the new bars.


the same... and some bonus calories as not quite so bad as half size... yet
chimp14uk2 h, 13 m ago

You're right, it's gone beyond a joke.These days, you have to eat 2 …You're right, it's gone beyond a joke.These days, you have to eat 2 chocolate bars just to get the same as 1 of the old chocolate bars.As for them saying that they're making them smaller to decrease people's calorie intake, the opposite it happening because they're eating 2 bars instead of 1.


Indeed. I think the new sugar drink tax is a bit of a failure as well (atm at least) as Coke & Pepsi, the most popular drinks, haven't changed their recipes so people will still be buying 330ml cans consuming the same amount of sugar but just paying more for it.
fwibble1 h, 4 m ago

brought


I’d already found plenty by that point!
‘Alid’, ‘belived’, ‘I was a normal packet of 4 stick’
fwibble1 h, 9 m ago

brought



Babbabooey4 m ago

I’d already found plenty by that point!‘Alid’, ‘belived’, ‘I was a normal p …I’d already found plenty by that point!‘Alid’, ‘belived’, ‘I was a normal packet of 4 stick’



...I stopped at "KitKat"
fanpages2 h, 9 m ago

If two of the new size are the same as one of the former size, then … If two of the new size are the same as one of the former size, then there is neither a decrease, nor an increase, in calorie intake. Those that do have a modicum of willpower, however, may be satisfied with one of the new bars.


You do get what I'm trying to say though, do you?
Or does everything have to be factually perfect to get you out of bed?

chimp14uk30th Apr

You do get what I'm trying to say though, do you?Or does everything have …You do get what I'm trying to say though, do you?Or does everything have to be factually perfect to get you out of bed?



Yes.
It’s not just ALDI is Asda and Tesco to they’ve been doing it for ages
I know! I bought a pack the other day and was sooooo upset when I opened them.
The taste has even changed. Absolutely gutted!
Thought this was an 80s joke thread when I saw the title.
Would you like a(nother) KitKat, chunky?
Andy@XCite18 h, 16 m ago

Indeed. I think the new sugar drink tax is a bit of a failure as well …Indeed. I think the new sugar drink tax is a bit of a failure as well (atm at least) as Coke & Pepsi, the most popular drinks, haven't changed their recipes so people will still be buying 330ml cans consuming the same amount of sugar but just paying more for it.


Why would they change their recipes for full sugar drinks? They already supply diet variations.
chocci4 m ago

Are you oblivious to this country's diabetes and obesity crisis?


People blame sugar for the obesity when it's actually the chips and burgers they keep downing that's responsible!
zworld2 h, 43 m ago

People blame sugar for the obesity when it's actually the chips and …People blame sugar for the obesity when it's actually the chips and burgers they keep downing that's responsible!


Sugar is worse than fat
chocci5 h, 56 m ago

Sugar is worse than fat



If, for example, a "low sugar" or "zero sugar" product is deemed to be "healthy", then is there any evidence that the substitute used (such as Aspartame, Acesulfame K [Potassium], or Maltitol, to name only a few) is not harmful to the general population of a specific individual seeking the alternative product?

Reducing (or eliminating) fat from our diets without understanding the ramifications is also not advisable.

Education to make informed choices is key. Just believing a product is "healthy" because an advertising campaign infers it is, is not a "healthy" approach either.

Consumption of anything in non-moderate/excessive amounts is not particularly a good course of action for anybody.
fanpages5 h, 50 m ago

If, for example, a "low sugar" or "zero sugar" product is deemed to be …If, for example, a "low sugar" or "zero sugar" product is deemed to be "healthy", then is there any evidence that the substitute used (such as Aspartame, Acesulfame K [Potassium], or Maltitol, to name only a few) is not harmful to the general population of a specific individual seeking the alternative product?Reducing (or eliminating) fat from our diets without understanding the ramifications is also not advisable.Education to make informed choices is key. Just believing a product is "healthy" because an advertising campaign infers it is, is not a "healthy" approach either.Consumption of anything in non-moderate/excessive amounts is not particularly a good course of action for anybody.


Aspartames potential health risks have been examined and dismissed by numerous scientific research projects. With the exception of the risk to those with phenylketonuria, aspartame is considered to be a safe food additive by governments worldwide and major health and food safety organizations.

US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) officials describe aspartame as "one of the most thoroughly tested and studied food additives the agency has ever approved" and its safety as "clear cut."

Critics say acesulfame potassium has not been studied adequately and may be carcinogenic, although these claims have been dismissed by the European Food Safety Authority and FDA.

Maltitol is also a generally recognized as safe substance. It is used to replace table sugar because it is half as caloric, does not promote tooth decay, and has a somewhat lesser effect on blood glucose. However, Maltitol has a laxative potential when consumed at levels above 100 grams per day.

All the above information is taken from Wikipedia. I know it's not the best place but is a good start. It also appears evidence based linked as well if you want to check it out.

I agree with all the other points you make though.

However, if you are looking for a more "natural" alternative to all the above you could try Stevia, extracted from the leaves of the plant Stevia rebaudiana, found in parts of Brazil and Paraguay.

There are also certain groups who are more likely to benefit from its remarkable sweetening potential as with those already mentioned. These include diabetic patients, those interested in decreasing caloric intake, and children.

So if you are looking for a sugar alternative then at the moment, Stevia seems most likely to be the best out there.

On the back of packaging it is also sometimes called ‘steviol glycosides’, which are the sweet-tasting compounds in the Stevia plant.

Though the reason why most of us are not using Stevia as an alternative is possibly because it is so expensive. Compared to a kilo of granulated sugar, currently 69p/Kilo, Stevia costs approx. £11 - £25 per kilo.

Both ASDA and Tesco sell Stevia, ASDA's is slightly cheaper though.

I'm sure if you do your research there are probably lots of products out there that also include stevia in their ingredients.

bbc.co.uk/pro…-me

tandfonline.com/doi…049

en.m.wikipedia.org/wik…via

en.m.wikipedia.org/wik…ana
chocci12 h, 2 m ago

Sugar is worse than fat


It isn't as simple as saying which is worse than the other, you could however argue that it's a combination of both.

Obesity is generally caused by eating too much and moving too little. If you consume high amounts of energy, particularly fat and sugars, but don't burn off the energy through exercise and physical activity, much of the surplus energy will be stored by the body as fat.

Like everything else the key to a healthy diet and lifestyle is moderation and a balanced diet. Oh yes, and of course, not forgetting exercise as well as mentioned above.

Obesity is also a very a complex subject. Possible reasons could be poor diet, e.g. eating large amounts of processed or fast food, drinking too much alcohol, eating out a lot, eating larger portions than you need, drinking too many sugary drink, and comfort eating.

Lack of physical activity as mentioned above is another important factor related to obesity.

Genetics and medical reasons are also factors as well - underactive thyroid gland, Cushing's syndrome for example.

And certain medicines can also contribute to weight gain.

nhs.uk/conditions/obesity/

Most people in the UK yes do already eat too much sugar, and much of this sugar is hidden in the foods we eat. According to the British Dietetic Association (BDA), added sugar is not necessary for a healthy diet. Yes, and many foods that contain added sugars also contain lots of calories, but often have few other nutrients, such as proteins, vitamins and minerals. Eating too many of these foods often can of course contribute to you becoming overweight.

However, it is possible to consume moderate amounts of sugar within a healthy balanced diet.

nhs.uk/news/obesity/is-sugar-causing-the-obesity-epidemic/

Overall, adults and children are already eating too much saturated fat, added sugar and salt. We are also not getting the recommended levels of fruit, vegetables, oily fish and fibre that our bodies need.

Too much fat in your diet, especially saturated fats, can raise your cholesterol, which increases the risk of heart disease.

However, small amount of fat is an essential part of a healthy, balanced diet. Fat is a source of essential fatty acids, which the body can't make itself.

There is also good evidence that there is a link between saturated fat and raised cholesterol levels, while there is also an issue in relation to the amount of sugar we eat and our weight. This means that, as well as cutting down on foods high in saturated fat and replacing saturated fats like butter with unsaturated fats like rapeseed, olive or sunflower oils, it’s important to keep an eye on the amount of added sugar we are eating as well, or that is in our drinks, so that we don’t end up consuming too many calories.

nhs.uk/news/food-and-diet/brits-eating-too-much-salt-sugar-and-fat/

nhs.uk/Livewell/Goodfood/Pages/Fat.aspx
Edited by: "LemonHead" 1st May
LemonHead18 m ago

Aspartames potential health risks have been examined and dismissed by …Aspartames potential health risks have been examined and dismissed by numerous scientific research projects. With the exception of the risk to those with phenylketonuria, aspartame is considered to be a safe food additive by governments worldwide and major health and food safety organizations.US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) officials describe aspartame as "one of the most thoroughly tested and studied food additives the agency has ever approved" and its safety as "clear cut...


I know the presence of Aspartame in food gives me severe headaches, & I am not aware that I suffer from phenylketonuria.
fanpages2 m ago

I know the presence of Aspartame in food gives me severe headaches, & I am …I know the presence of Aspartame in food gives me severe headaches, & I am not aware that I suffer from phenylketonuria.


Out of interest, how do you know that it's aspartame that's causing the headaches?
LemonHead5 m ago

Out of interest, how do you know that it's aspartame that's causing the …Out of interest, how do you know that it's aspartame that's causing the headaches?


By compiling a diary of food/drink consumed (quantities, time taken, & noted outcome) over a period of one month under guidance from a dietician after I had an initial consultation with my General Practitioner, & subsequent referral to a dietary specialist at my local hospital.
fanpages7 m ago

By compiling a diary of food/drink consumed (quantities, time taken, & …By compiling a diary of food/drink consumed (quantities, time taken, & noted outcome) over a period of one month under guidance from a dietician after I had an initial consultation with my General Practitioner, & subsequent referral to a dietary specialist at my local hospital.


I don't doubt what you're saying though it is strange as I'm reading about a study that shows that an aspartame-laced cereal bar caused no more adverse symptoms than a bar without aspartame in a group or people who said they were sensitive to aspartame.

Interesting.

nhs.uk/news/food-and-diet/research-casts-doubt-on-aspartame-sensitivity/
Edited by: "LemonHead" 1st May
LemonHead11 m ago

I don't doubt what you're saying though it is strange as I'm reading about …I don't doubt what you're saying though it is strange as I'm reading about a study that shows that an aspartame-laced cereal bar caused no more adverse symptoms than a bar without aspartame in a group or people who said they were sensitive to aspartame.Interesting.nhs.uk/news/food-and-diet/research-casts-doubt-on-aspartame-sensitivity/


That's the problem with subjective results; they are subjective.
fanpages4 m ago

That's the problem with subjective results; they are subjective.


Good point. I'll read it more thoroughly when I've got a more clearer head. It's that time of day, if you know what I mean.
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