laminator advice please.

6
Found 4th Sep 2017
Hi folks am totally clueless here. I am looking g to purchase a laminator for the children's school work. Do they only work for size A4? Some things like timetables are half the size of A5 so quite small. Is it possible to laminate such small things and how do you trim them, i know a cutter is used but at which stage. also max budget probably around £30. Thankyou
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im not a professional but you can cut the laminating folders before use id have thought. Theyre just a folder and you put the paper between and the laminator rolls it through and heats it so it sticks. Not sure what you would use it for re school work as its quite sturdy when done. You can trim with scissors. I love mine and i think it was £6.99 on amazon x
You can either trim the laminate down to suit or just buy various size laminate A4/A5/A6 ... down to business card size
Thank you guys.
Hi IWOOTN. Hope you are well. I regularly need to laminate several very small items (20-40 little labels) all in the same A4 sized pouch. Just arrange them with plenty of space around them (i.e. not too close to an adjoining item) and smooth out the pouch to remove as much air as you can. The items will usually stay in place as you carefully insert it into the machine. I find placing a book (or flat object) at the same height as the mouth of the laminator allows for smooth entry with minimal disturbance to the pouch.

Then either run the pouch back through a second time, or if the items inside are of a decent enough size, cut around them - leaving a 2 or 3mm "border" of laminate - them run just those cutouts back through again to better seal the edges. As previously mentioned, you can cut the laminate beforehand but I find this an inconvenience. Admittedly, this method is not as good as laminating one item in one pouch and sometimes the laminated edges can separate but it all depends on what you are doing. If the item you are laminating needs to be 'watertight' for instance, then just one item inside (and possibly 2 passes) is best.

So, to your questions. A cheap 'n' cheerful (Tesco/Wilko etc.) laminator will do the job fine. As to cutting, it's up to you. Cut before - cut after. I prefer after as you can see where the 'border' is and cut around as appropriate. Unless you want super-perfect edges, I wouldn't worry about a cutter (or guillotine) as a pair of decent scissors or a steel rule (Poundland) and craft knife is perfect. DON'T USE A PLASTIC RULER! Hehe. You still need ALL your fingers!

Here's an example machine:
wilko.com/pap…623

or:

tesco.com/dir…470


Which is a good laminator/cutter kit on offer at the moment.


And I use these pouches (They have gone up in price (were £2.00) but are still good value.):
wilko.com/pap…627

or if you want a nice selection of "ready" sizes.:

tesco.com/dir…474

There you go. Get laminating!

All the best, Phsy.
You put the work in laminator sheets, then cut afterwards. Schools use gilatene ( not sure of the corrext spelling).
I bought mine for £8.99 on Aldi clearence in-store but originally its £12.99 and the size is A3, that means you can use any size upto A3.

I wouldn't do any cutting up before as i often use them in schools because it can interfere in sizes. Schools get a card wallet to insert the laminator sheet but i didn't get one with my order from ebay.
Edited by: "Misslovely" 4th Sep 2017
Phsycronix13 h, 37 m ago

Hi IWOOTN. Hope you are well. I regularly need to laminate several very …Hi IWOOTN. Hope you are well. I regularly need to laminate several very small items (20-40 little labels) all in the same A4 sized pouch. Just arrange them with plenty of space around them (i.e. not too close to an adjoining item) and smooth out the pouch to remove as much air as you can. The items will usually stay in place as you carefully insert it into the machine. I find placing a book (or flat object) at the same height as the mouth of the laminator allows for smooth entry with minimal disturbance to the pouch.Then either run the pouch back through a second time, or if the items inside are of a decent enough size, cut around them - leaving a 2 or 3mm "border" of laminate - them run just those cutouts back through again to better seal the edges. As previously mentioned, you can cut the laminate beforehand but I find this an inconvenience. Admittedly, this method is not as good as laminating one item in one pouch and sometimes the laminated edges can separate but it all depends on what you are doing. If the item you are laminating needs to be 'watertight' for instance, then just one item inside (and possibly 2 passes) is best.So, to your questions. A cheap 'n' cheerful (Tesco/Wilko etc.) laminator will do the job fine. As to cutting, it's up to you. Cut before - cut after. I prefer after as you can see where the 'border' is and cut around as appropriate. Unless you want super-perfect edges, I wouldn't worry about a cutter (or guillotine) as a pair of decent scissors or a steel rule (Poundland) and craft knife is perfect. DON'T USE A PLASTIC RULER! Hehe. You still need ALL your fingers!Here's an example machine:http://www.wilko.com/paper-shredding+laminating/texet-personal-laminator-a4-lma4-v/invt/0240623or:https://www.tesco.com/direct/texet-value-pack-a4-laminator-a4-paper-trimm/637-6470.prd?skuId=637-6470Which is a good laminator/cutter kit on offer at the moment.And I use these pouches (They have gone up in price (were £2.00) but are still good value.):http://www.wilko.com/paper-shredding+laminating/texet-laminating-pouches-a4-x-25/invt/0240627or if you want a nice selection of "ready" sizes.:https://www.tesco.com/direct/tesco-home-office-laminator-pouches-50-pack-mixed-selection/202-8474.prd?skuId=202-8474There you go. Get laminating!All the best, Phsy.

Gold star for such a great answer. Agree totally couldn't have put it better.
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