Laptop for programming and normal use

12
Found 15th Feb
Hey so I have a late 2011 MacBook Pro and I’m sure now is a time for a upgrade. I casually play games and program on software such as eclipse and python was hoping someone could help me find a good laptop which can easily run these features and last 5-10 years and I was hoping it was a Mac but I’m down for a change but budget is £2,000
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Your budget is good to go and buy the best you can with your use case not likely to be the most taxing . Lasting upto 10 years is going to be unlikely though - can already see the increase in changes and performance from AMD having stepped up. Competition is great for us consumers and brings rapid change unlike the last 10 years.
I put an SSD in a late 2011 15"MBP just before Christmas with a fresh install and it still runs reasonably fast, I use it for general tasks including Adobe Lightroom, MS office and I run a Mac version of Hyperspin (retro console and arcade games)
If you're serious about programming you should really consider keeping your mac, or upgrading to another mac. If you're just playing around with it then a windows machine will be fine.A windows machine will last you 5 years with the right parts, as will a mac, however you have to keep ontop of your windows machine. The way windows is built allows it to get clogged up and slow down requiring lots of maintenance to keep it at top speed.

You have the option of going windows and using ubuntu to access a unix command line but I fear ubuntu doesnt have the same software or support for software available as the other 2 OS's.
murtgurge1 h, 57 m ago

If you're serious about programming you should really consider keeping …If you're serious about programming you should really consider keeping your mac, or upgrading to another mac. If you're just playing around with it then a windows machine will be fine.A windows machine will last you 5 years with the right parts, as will a mac, however you have to keep ontop of your windows machine. The way windows is built allows it to get clogged up and slow down requiring lots of maintenance to keep it at top speed.You have the option of going windows and using ubuntu to access a unix command line but I fear ubuntu doesnt have the same software or support for software available as the other 2 OS's.


Not sure I concur with this advise.
Eclipse ide and python are both part of open source community.

Could argue Apples control whilst ensuring everything as it is as they wish can limit you.
As open source I have used these on Ubuntu, red hat, centos and windows. Rarely see professional coders/programmers using Mac as for a start they usually want to get as close as they can to their target and I have not seen a data centre or itpac being underpinned by Mac os. Designers where aesthetics are more import it is more common.
Windows pro of course has its hypervisor built in allowing you by default to spin up other environments (if writing test driven scripts you will would want multiple) - on Mac isn' built in but needed adding last time I checked.
Original Poster
Bertz993 h, 59 m ago

Your budget is good to go and buy the best you can with your use case not …Your budget is good to go and buy the best you can with your use case not likely to be the most taxing . Lasting upto 10 years is going to be unlikely though - can already see the increase in changes and performance from AMD having stepped up. Competition is great for us consumers and brings rapid change unlike the last 10 years.


Thanks!
Original Poster
paulj482 h, 59 m ago

I put an SSD in a late 2011 15"MBP just before Christmas with a fresh …I put an SSD in a late 2011 15"MBP just before Christmas with a fresh install and it still runs reasonably fast, I use it for general tasks including Adobe Lightroom, MS office and I run a Mac version of Hyperspin (retro console and arcade games)


I changed the RAM from 4gb to 16gb it’s just starting to lag which bugs me off I was thinking of putting an SSD not sure how to do it though thanks for the help!
Original Poster
murtgurge2 h, 21 m ago

If you're serious about programming you should really consider keeping …If you're serious about programming you should really consider keeping your mac, or upgrading to another mac. If you're just playing around with it then a windows machine will be fine.A windows machine will last you 5 years with the right parts, as will a mac, however you have to keep ontop of your windows machine. The way windows is built allows it to get clogged up and slow down requiring lots of maintenance to keep it at top speed.You have the option of going windows and using ubuntu to access a unix command line but I fear ubuntu doesnt have the same software or support for software available as the other 2 OS's.


Thanks! Looking for a Mac not sure which one to go for
Original Poster
Bertz9925 m ago

Not sure I concur with this advise.Eclipse ide and python are both part of …Not sure I concur with this advise.Eclipse ide and python are both part of open source community. Could argue Apples control whilst ensuring everything as it is as they wish can limit you.As open source I have used these on Ubuntu, red hat, centos and windows. Rarely see professional coders/programmers using Mac as for a start they usually want to get as close as they can to their target and I have not seen a data centre or itpac being underpinned by Mac os. Designers where aesthetics are more import it is more common.Windows pro of course has its hypervisor built in allowing you by default to spin up other environments (if writing test driven scripts you will would want multiple) - on Mac isn' built in but needed adding last time I checked.


I wouldn’t mind a chance as I use windows at school but Macs are so good for me personally
jimit14515th Feb

I changed the RAM from 4gb to 16gb it’s just starting to lag which bugs me …I changed the RAM from 4gb to 16gb it’s just starting to lag which bugs me off I was thinking of putting an SSD not sure how to do it though thanks for the help!



I'd try a SSD before parting with £2k you may get a few more years out of it, mine used to display the beach ball spinner all the time, not any more and I only have 8GB ram. Even if you have to pay a local shop to fit it you'll end up with a machine that runs like new. Have a look at some Youtube video comparing SSD speeds with the stock drive, you'll be surprised the difference it makes.
Bertz991 h, 1 m ago

Not sure I concur with this advise.Eclipse ide and python are both part of …Not sure I concur with this advise.Eclipse ide and python are both part of open source community. Could argue Apples control whilst ensuring everything as it is as they wish can limit you.As open source I have used these on Ubuntu, red hat, centos and windows. Rarely see professional coders/programmers using Mac as for a start they usually want to get as close as they can to their target and I have not seen a data centre or itpac being underpinned by Mac os. Designers where aesthetics are more import it is more common.Windows pro of course has its hypervisor built in allowing you by default to spin up other environments (if writing test driven scripts you will would want multiple) - on Mac isn' built in but needed adding last time I checked.


during my degree the whole class was either on a macbook and our labs were all iMac computers except when we worked in c or c++, professionally the company I work for solely uses Macbooks (though 90% of our users are on windows), and any events I attend such as PHP:NW I always only see Macs

as you say developers want to get as close to the target machine as they can, and for those that don't use ubuntu, mac is the closest with a unix command line, I don't know what hypervisor is, but in my academic, professional, and personal life I see development dominated by OSX

I mean I couldnt live without a windows PC, my desktop is windows with plain old ubuntu 16.04 also via dual boot, and then my macbook - if I was going to drop anything though it would be my desktop without flinching, I probably haven't booted into ubuntu in more than 4months cause I just dont think it's a friendly OS and doesn't have the software/software features/software support the other ones do despite

if you're comfortable with ubuntu then dual booting is a fine option I suppose, but to each their own
murtgurge4 h, 8 m ago

during my degree the whole class was either on a macbook and our labs were …during my degree the whole class was either on a macbook and our labs were all iMac computers except when we worked in c or c++, professionally the company I work for solely uses Macbooks (though 90% of our users are on windows), and any events I attend such as PHP:NW I always only see Macsas you say developers want to get as close to the target machine as they can, and for those that don't use ubuntu, mac is the closest with a unix command line, I don't know what hypervisor is, but in my academic, professional, and personal life I see development dominated by OSXI mean I couldnt live without a windows PC, my desktop is windows with plain old ubuntu 16.04 also via dual boot, and then my macbook - if I was going to drop anything though it would be my desktop without flinching, I probably haven't booted into ubuntu in more than 4months cause I just dont think it's a friendly OS and doesn't have the software/software features/software support the other ones do despite if you're comfortable with ubuntu then dual booting is a fine option I suppose, but to each their own



Professionally a computer is a tool to do a task and there are many options - the op has stated he has a preference for Mac which is fair. Most of what you provided was with subjective bias that doesn't fully hold water and hence why I do not fully concur with you.

Hypervisors you need to look up - Azure is based on theirs called hyper-v.

Also I can assure you if you look beyond conferences and at the big solutions Mac have very little penetration.

P.s. you are not the only one with a degree (or two) and when I say big solutions I mean talking to Microsoft about their Azure cloud offering being unable to cope.
Edited by: "Bertz99" 15th Feb
Original Poster
paulj481 h, 19 m ago

I'd try a SSD before parting with £2k you may get a few more years out of …I'd try a SSD before parting with £2k you may get a few more years out of it, mine used to display the beach ball spinner all the time, not any more and I only have 8GB ram. Even if you have to pay a local shop to fit it you'll end up with a machine that runs like new. Have a look at some Youtube video comparing SSD speeds with the stock drive, you'll be surprised the difference it makes.


Thanks a lot my RAM is already 16gb and the beach ball still hasn’t appeared I’m interested in the SSD not sure which one to get
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