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Posted 10th Feb
Hello I have a question a distant family member has made a will leaving property and bank accounts to be split equally between myself and another family member however my date of birth on the document is wrong everything else seems fine it’s just the date that’s wrong would this be a problem should it be changed?
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An interesting question that helps answer your query is how you come to know this information. If it has been intentionally shown to you, mention the error now. Wills are not often shared prior to death, but at that point they become public via the courts.

Short answer 1 and for certainty; mention it to the person. A Codicil can be drawn up correcting the error. Cost is maybe £100 from a solicitor or you can do it yourself. Its not complex and examples abound. A friendly solicitor may be helpful in correcting the error VIA THE person making the will

Short answer 2; wills usually state name, address, relationship and sometimes DoB. If the other points are present and only DoB is wrong, you could wing it. Depends on the state of mind of the person making the will. Some get very tetchy as EoL approaches. And you might want to consider whether anyone else might like to stake a claim that they are the intended beneficiary. People can be very surprising when it comes to legacies up for grabs.
15 Comments
who is responsible for executing the will? it is they who will determine the exact beneficiaries and deal with dispersing the effectts iaw the will
Edited by: "tardytortoise" 10th Feb
tardytortoise10/02/2020 18:17

who is responsible for executing the will? it is they who will determine …who is responsible for executing the will? it is they who will determine the exact beneficiaries and deal with dispersing the efforts iaw the will


Well I believe it’s a family friend placed in charge of executing the will and the will has been drawn recently I’m just wondering if it would be easier to just take my passport and visit the solicitor just get the will changed I guess.
Sonic_Rahman10/02/2020 18:25

Well I believe it’s a family friend placed in charge of executing the will …Well I believe it’s a family friend placed in charge of executing the will and the will has been drawn recently I’m just wondering if it would be easier to just take my passport and visit the solicitor just get the will changed I guess.


I don’t think the solicitor will entertain you, as your proof of ID does not tally with those on the will. Can whoever made the will not change it? or have they passed?
Toptrumpet10/02/2020 18:42

I don’t think the solicitor will entertain you, as your proof of ID does n …I don’t think the solicitor will entertain you, as your proof of ID does not tally with those on the will. Can whoever made the will not change it? or have they passed?



It is a minor problem unless there is another relative floating about with the same name or date of birth.
i didn't even know you need to state someone's date of birth in a will. i thought all you need is their full name and relationship to you. that would be enough to identify the beneficiary surely? it may also help to add their existing address so they can traced in the future?

i can't remember having to state hubby or my mum's date of birth whenever i completed a pension or life assurance nomination form.
Sonic_Rahman10/02/2020 18:25

Well I believe it’s a family friend placed in charge of executing the will …Well I believe it’s a family friend placed in charge of executing the will and the will has been drawn recently I’m just wondering if it would be easier to just take my passport and visit the solicitor just get the will changed I guess.



Most of what you need to know is in here
citizensadvice.org.uk/fam…ls/
You cannot change anybody elses will. Only the person who made the will can change it and obviously only if they are still alive AND they can be witnessed as being of sound mind to change it.
An interesting question that helps answer your query is how you come to know this information. If it has been intentionally shown to you, mention the error now. Wills are not often shared prior to death, but at that point they become public via the courts.

Short answer 1 and for certainty; mention it to the person. A Codicil can be drawn up correcting the error. Cost is maybe £100 from a solicitor or you can do it yourself. Its not complex and examples abound. A friendly solicitor may be helpful in correcting the error VIA THE person making the will

Short answer 2; wills usually state name, address, relationship and sometimes DoB. If the other points are present and only DoB is wrong, you could wing it. Depends on the state of mind of the person making the will. Some get very tetchy as EoL approaches. And you might want to consider whether anyone else might like to stake a claim that they are the intended beneficiary. People can be very surprising when it comes to legacies up for grabs.
ccnp10/02/2020 19:25

An interesting question that helps answer your query is how you come to …An interesting question that helps answer your query is how you come to know this information. If it has been intentionally shown to you, mention the error now. Wills are not often shared prior to death, but at that point they become public via the courts.Short answer 1 and for certainty; mention it to the person. A Codicil can be drawn up correcting the error. Cost is maybe £100 from a solicitor or you can do it yourself. Its not complex and examples abound. A friendly solicitor may be helpful in correcting the error VIA THE person making the willShort answer 2; wills usually state name, address, relationship and sometimes DoB. If the other points are present and only DoB is wrong, you could wing it. Depends on the state of mind of the person making the will. Some get very tetchy as EoL approaches. And you might want to consider whether anyone else might like to stake a claim that they are the intended beneficiary. People can be very surprising when it comes to legacies up for grabs.


Thank you and the reason I know is because the solicitor has sent it me at the request of the family member so yes I guess it’s intentional and il take your advice on board and see about the codicil tbh I’ve never even herd of it but let’s see where it goes. Thank you
Toptrumpet10/02/2020 18:42

I don’t think the solicitor will entertain you, as your proof of ID does n …I don’t think the solicitor will entertain you, as your proof of ID does not tally with those on the will. Can whoever made the will not change it? or have they passed?


Ah yes I didn’t consider about the information not matching and yes he can have it changed but I was just trying to avoid the extra costs involved .
Willy_Wonka10/02/2020 18:49

It is a minor problem unless there is another relative floating about with …It is a minor problem unless there is another relative floating about with the same name or date of birth.


Nope no other relative I just wanted to make sure everything’s right on paperwork
tardytortoise10/02/2020 19:19

Most of what you need to know is in …Most of what you need to know is in herehttps://www.citizensadvice.org.uk/family/death-and-wills/wills/#h-how-to-change-a-willYou cannot change anybody elses will. Only the person who made the will can change it and obviously only if they are still alive AND they can be witnessed as being of sound mind to change it.


Thank you
mutley110/02/2020 19:17

i didn't even know you need to state someone's date of birth in a will. i …i didn't even know you need to state someone's date of birth in a will. i thought all you need is their full name and relationship to you. that would be enough to identify the beneficiary surely? it may also help to add their existing address so they can traced in the future?i can't remember having to state hubby or my mum's date of birth whenever i completed a pension or life assurance nomination form.


I’ve never had to deal with wills so I’m not sure but I believe date of birth is required specially when it involves large amounts of monies or property.
Can't the family member whose will it is just write the correct date on a piece of paper, sign it have it witnessed by a friend or neighbour, ie someone who is not benefitting, and attach this to the will document? There must be lots of wills with incorrect addresses of beneficiaries etc as they have moved house etc.

Alternatively, as their solicitor has sent you a copy presumably they have asked you to acknowledge receipt of it. Write back to them advising them that your date of birth is wrong, an take it from there.
Edited by: "JimboParrot" 11th Feb
Presumably this is why the solicitor has sent you a copy, to verify details are correct, solicitors don't work for free so it is unlikely your relative has had him send you a copy for fun.
A date of birth isn't a requirement of a will, neither for the person it's made by, or the beneficiary.

It can be information used to help verify you will be a beneficiary when it's not clear, which is why the relationship to the person is usually stated - unless there is another "Joe Bloggs", nephew/brother etc of said person then its a complete non-issue that doesn't need changing if it's reached the final witnessed stage and the solictor isn't prepared to re-issue the document aslong as it can be understood you are the intended recipient.

It's only if the intended recipient wouldnt be clear without this extra information that it would be an issue, as there would be confusion whether it's Joe Blogs born September or Joe Bloggs born in October if neither date of birth matches the Joe Bloggs.

However, it highlights the importance of all anyone writing a will asking people their correct information prior to writing a will, whilst it's okay, its better to get everything correct the first time, this is what drafts are for.

Date of births are only ever usually taken to determine whether the beneficiaries are over the age of 18, and often don't make it into the will unless there will be confusion identifying the beneficiary.

If it's still in the draft stage - forward your correct details to the solictor.
If not, notify the person that the details are incorrect and then they can decide what they want to do from there, ultimately it's their will and their choice.
Edited by: "Gynx" 11th Feb
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