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    Laying real oak wooden flooring.

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    Hopefully in the next week or so (and certainly prior to Xmas), the building work at home will be at the stage I can start get the flooring sorted. (Plastering should be finished today and the 6 new hardwood doors are being fitted on Saturday.)

    The builder hasnt done anything with the floor so far.... thats been my job! The floor is structured by concrete slab, damp couse, leveling compound, 125mm Jablite, 25mm Kingspan, 22mm Floorboards - which is "floating" and unfixed.

    The wooden flooring I intend on buying, would normally be permanently fixed, but with it being a floating floor, it doesnt sound the right thing to do! Everywhere online Ive seen, suggest the flooring is glued down (looks similar to laying tiles!) and also nail gunned with "pins".

    So as its a floating floor - should proper wooden flooring be glued and pinned in that way? Or should it float also (but panels be glued to togther as normal so its a complete floor mass.)


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    13 Comments

    do not glue and pin them it will knacker it up as wooden floors contract and expand(I found this out the hard way)

    It should just be floating with the panels glued together,a much easier job as well

    I'm not too sure of the significance of the base being a floating floor but you can certainly lay the real wood as a floating floor. I bought solid oak flooring from B&Q and the installation instructions detail this method.

    Can't help with any technical advice Guv but just wondered where you're getting your flooring from and what price per metre are you paying? We're just about to start getting quotes for our place and it would be interesting to see what sort of prices are out there.
    Oak looks great and would go with our furniture but seems to be blummin' pricey.

    we are just in the process of getting our flooring put into our new house, but as the bulders won't let us in ourselves to do it before we exchange contacts we are having to get someone to do it for us, not sure how they are doing it but i'll find out

    Your solid wooden floor will probably absorb more moisture than the floorboards and therefore expand and contract more than the floorboards. If you fix the solid wood to the floorboards you could have problems.....

    Maybe the supplier can give some advice or you could try the Screwfix forums....

    Original Poster Banned

    boothy;7010098

    do not glue and pin them it will knacker it up as wooden floors contract … do not glue and pin them it will knacker it up as wooden floors contract and expand(I found this out the hard way)It should just be floating with the panels glued together,a much easier job as well



    shellb159;7010103

    I'm not too sure of the significance of the base being a floating floor … I'm not too sure of the significance of the base being a floating floor but you can certainly lay the real wood as a floating floor. I bought solid oak flooring from B&Q and the installation instructions detail this method.



    Cheers guys. The expansion and contraction part was the thing that was baffleing me. Even though its going on wood - even that expands and contracts at different rates!

    Evil_monkey;7010106

    Can't help with any technical advice Guv but just wondered where you're … Can't help with any technical advice Guv but just wondered where you're getting your flooring from and what price per metre are you paying? We're just about to start getting quotes for our place and it would be interesting to see what sort of prices are out there.Oak looks great and would go with our furniture but seems to be blummin' pricey.



    I've got a trade card with Selco. They have some on spl offer until 31 december @ £20 + VAT per Sq m. They seem to have some (different) wooden flooring each month - just that this months does look nicer and I'm not ready for it! (Jeez - i bought the doors 9 weeks ago - and their only being fitted this weeked!)

    Original Poster Banned

    souljacker;7010191

    we are just in the process of getting our flooring put into our new … we are just in the process of getting our flooring put into our new house, but as the bulders won't let us in ourselves to do it before we exchange contacts we are having to get someone to do it for us, not sure how they are doing it but i'll find out



    Cheers

    gari189;7010215

    Your solid wooden floor will probably absorb more moisture than the … Your solid wooden floor will probably absorb more moisture than the floorboards and therefore expand and contract more than the floorboards. If you fix the solid wood to the floorboards you could have problems.....Maybe the supplier can give some advice or you could try the Screwfix forums....



    Good point. Forgot about their forums!

    just for info I used Pergo flooring in my apartment.....really good and would recommend it

    Because you need to leave sizeable gaps to allow the wood to move it is a worthwhile exercise to remove all skirting boards and replace once the flooring is fitted. Well worth the effort as the job is far superior to cutting gaps all round and filling with cork, etc.
    Be careful to put the flooring unwrapped in the room you intend to install into as it needs time to adjust to the environment. If it is expensive flooring just ask a proffesional how much they would charge, it will get done quicker and at least you have some come back should problems develop.

    And do not fix it to the sub floor at all, it floats as well

    Original Poster Banned

    mosskeeto;7010401

    Because you need to leave sizeable gaps to allow the wood to move it is a … Because you need to leave sizeable gaps to allow the wood to move it is a worthwhile exercise to remove all skirting boards and replace once the flooring is fitted. Well worth the effort as the job is far superior to cutting gaps all round and filling with cork, etc.



    Its a new build..... so no skirting down yet. I did remove all the skirting when I laid laminate though. It looks tacky with those dodgy edging strips!

    Be careful to put the flooring unwrapped in the room you intend to … Be careful to put the flooring unwrapped in the room you intend to install into as it needs time to adjust to the environment. If it is expensive flooring just ask a proffesional how much they would charge, it will get done quicker and at least you have some come back should problems develop.



    Yeh, I'll put it in the room a week before.

    The room itself is almost a perfect rectangle, so no point in paying someone. (Same goes with the floor tiling that I'll have to put elsewhere in the build.

    And do not fix it to the sub floor at all, it floats as well



    Cool...... That was what I thought it would be..... it was just all the info found online that made me ask!

    Once down remember, no high heels (you or the missus!) and little felt pads under all of your furniture...

    hi, i have two wooden floors fitted. expansion is avoided by not fitting the boards wall to call, leaving a gap, which is covered by the skirting board. both my floors were glued to the concrete base. if it is a new base it will be full of water. you can get a meter to measure this. when it is dry enough the floor can be fitted otherwise the wood soaks up the moisture causing it to warp etc. a floating floor requires much more work and effort.

    Original Poster Banned

    mosskeeto;7010805

    Once down remember, no high heels (you or the missus!) and little felt … Once down remember, no high heels (you or the missus!) and little felt pads under all of your furniture...



    Yeh, my builder mentioned that. I'll have to take them off at the door before entering!

    porgal;7011183

    hi, i have two wooden floors fitted. expansion is avoided by not fitting … hi, i have two wooden floors fitted. expansion is avoided by not fitting the boards wall to call, leaving a gap, which is covered by the skirting board. both my floors were glued to the concrete base. if it is a new base it will be full of water. you can get a meter to measure this. when it is dry enough the floor can be fitted otherwise the wood soaks up the moisture causing it to warp etc. a floating floor requires much more work and effort.



    The concrete in the base is about 8" below this so not an issue. The wooden flooring will sit on wooden floorboard.

    Also, not glueing would mean I could lay some sound proofing.
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